Mass Extinctions, Evolutionary Leaps, and the Virus-Information Connection

Benjamin

Dagobah Resident
It's great that you appreciate this work!

I'm been thinking lately about publishing two books instead of one.

This first book would consist of the 25 first chapters of which 22 already have been published in this thread. It would include this first four parts.

The title would be something like: "Comet, Virus and Evolutionary Leaps"

As it is, the first book would be approximately 300 pages.

The second book would consist of the last 20 or so chapters. It would include the last three parts.

The title might something like "Virus and Proteins, Antennas to the Information Field"

What do you all think?

Well, your 1st book is 350+ pages and your 2nd book is 284 pages. By the sounds of it, if you were to wait and publish in one volume, it might be around 600-700 pages, with a timeline of est. another 8-12 months? The way things are, you could get the info out to the general public quicker in two volumes. I'd say, if the 'one' is almost ready to go and you feel it's 'solid', in the words of Ben Bradlee from the movie 'All the President's Men': "Print that, baby."
 
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Mari

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I think it is a great idea Pierre!!!!

I have a question; why not print it all in one? Is is a final book price issue or 700 pages book issue?

Concerning your last book, it was around 370 pages, but 70 of them is Bibliography; then the rest of this 300 pages there is probably around 100 pages of pictures.
That leaves the book ok 200 pages with footnotes.
Right?
So in case of your new book, this 700 pages doesn’t sound that big.
I mean, I would be happy to read your research on 1700 pages… 😅

I just want to piont out that in this case and with this subject it only sound big, but your books are very interesting and filled with pictures and references and so on, so I don’t think you should worry if it turns out to be a 700 pages book.

But if you are worried about final price of the book and think that it would be easier for people to spend 20-30€ per book in a few months period and not 50-60€ at once, then yeah, split it up.

In any case - go ahead and print it! ☺️
 

MK Scarlett

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
It's great that you appreciate this work!

I'm been thinking lately about publishing two books instead of one.

This first book would consist of the 25 first chapters of which 22 already have been published in this thread. It would include this first four parts.

The title would be something like: "Comet, Virus and Evolutionary Leaps"

As it is, the first book would be approximately 300 pages.

The second book would consist of the last 20 or so chapters. It would include the last three parts.

The title might something like "Virus and Proteins, Antennas to the Information Field"

What do you all think?

It's mostly a matter of delay. The third book "Comet, Virus and Evolutionary Leaps", the first 22 chapters published in this thread + 3 extra chapters, is almost ready. The fourth book will take months to be completed.
I thought the bolded part was the reason of your previous post. In my humble opinion, I would say print what is ready, and go for a second book. We don't know how long we have before things in the world become so problematic that one can no longer print a book, or even sell it, and therefore allow readers to buy it.

And if time allows you to print and sell both, so much the better! I often tend to say that what's done is done and does not need to be done anymore, and I'd rather have at least the first book than no book at all!

But it is only my humble opinion, and maybe others would have other answers.

On a side note, I spent part of the afternoon reading the chapters I had not yet read, and I am now on chapter 15. I had a great time doing so, so thanks again for your tremendous work!
 

Bobo08

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
I agree that printing it in two volumes is better. Time to readers is one consideration. Another is that two 300-page volumes is much less intimidating to an average reader than one 700-page volume :)

Thank you for all your efforts, Pierre! It has been an illuminating read for me.
 

Voyageur

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
I'm been thinking lately about publishing two books instead of one.

This first book would consist of the 25 first chapters of which 22 already have been published in this thread. It would include this first four parts.

The title would be something like: "Comet, Virus and Evolutionary Leaps"

As it is, the first book would be approximately 300 pages.

The second book would consist of the last 20 or so chapters. It would include the last three parts.

The title might something like "Virus and Proteins, Antennas to the Information Field"

What do you all think?

Only you can know, however I'm inclined to say that delays for the last book impact the first book by waiting, and what you have done is ready for wide readership. So, agree with others, go for it now. You well deserve to have your work out there.
 

thorbiorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Thank you, Pierre, for making the material so rich and at the same time accessible in both style and presentation. I agree with many others who suggest that you publish what you have. If you learn something new about the subjects you have covered, you can present additional information in a preface or an appendix to the next volume, or weave it into the chapters of the book.

Below are some comments:
Despite the utter devastation experienced by Florence, or because of it, three of the greatest minds of the Renaissance in the whole world were born in this town or its close vicinity:​
Some historians have postulated that Florence was the birthplace of the Renaissance as a result of luck, i.e., because "Great Men" were born there by chance: Leonardo da Vinci[28], Botticelli[29] and Michelangelo[30] were all born in Tuscany. [31]


Maybe, like the above mentioned quote suggests, the birth of the three of greatest minds of the renaissance was due to sheer luck, or maybe the integration of the viral sequence of the Black Death virus, in the genome of the survivors and their progeny enable a new way of thinking?
Botticelli was born in 1445, Leonardo in 1452 and Michelangelo in 1475. A contemporary also born in Florence was Niccolò Machiavelli (3 May 1469 – 21 June 1527). There are more people from the Florence area who influenced the Italian Renaissance:

Three influential writers born in or around Florence before the Black Death
Giovanni Boccaccio (UK: /bəˈkætʃioʊ/, US: /boʊˈkɑːtʃ(i)oʊ, bə-/, Italian: [dʒoˈvanni bokˈkattʃo]; 16 June 1313 – 21 December 1375)[nb 1] was an Italian writer, poet, correspondent of Petrarch, and an important Renaissance humanist. Born in the town of Certaldo, he became so well known as a writer that he was sometimes simply known as "the Certaldese"[nb 2] and one of the most important figures in the European literary panorama of the fourteenth century. Some scholars (including Vittore Branca) define him as the greatest European prose writer of his time, a versatile writer who amalgamated different literary trends and genres, making them converge in original works, thanks to a creative activity exercised under the banner of experimentalism.

His most notable works are The Decameron,
a collection of short stories which in the following centuries was a determining element for the Italian literary tradition, especially after Pietro Bembo elevated the Boccaccian style to a model of Italian prose in the sixteenth century, and On Famous Women. He wrote his imaginative literature mostly in Tuscan vernacular, as well as other works in Latin, and is particularly noted for his realistic dialogue which differed from that of his contemporaries, medieval writers who usually followed formulaic models for character and plot. The influence of Boccaccio's works was not limited to the Italian cultural scene but extended to the rest of Europe, exerting influence on authors such as Geoffrey Chaucer,[3] a key figure in English literature, or later on Miguel de Cervantes, Lope de Vega and the Spanish classical theater.

Boccaccio, together with Dante Alighieri and Francesco Petrarca, is part of the so-called "Three Crowns" of Italian literature.[4] He is remembered for being one of the precursors of humanism, of which he helped lay the foundations in the city of Florence, in conjunction with the activity of his friend and teacher Petrarch. He was the one who initiated Dante's criticism and philology: Boccaccio devoted himself to copying codices of the Divine Comedy and was a promoter of Dante's work and figure.
Boccaccio was born in or near Florence:
The details of Boccaccio's birth are uncertain. He was born in Florence or in a village near Certaldo where his family was from.[5][6] He was the son of Florentine merchant Boccaccino di Chellino and an unknown woman; he was likely born out of wedlock.[7] Boccaccio's stepmother was called Margherita de' Mardoli.[8]
Mentioned in the above Wiki, was Dante Alighieri.
Dante Alighieri (Italian: [ˈdante aliˈɡjɛːri]), probably baptized Durante di Alighiero degli Alighieri[note 1] and often referred to simply as Dante (/ˈdɑːnteɪ, ˈdænteɪ, ˈdænti/,[2][3] also US: /ˈdɑːnti/;[4] c. 1265 – 14 September 1321), was an Italian[a] poet, writer and philosopher.[6] His Divine Comedy, originally called Comedìa (modern Italian: Commedia) and later christened Divina by Giovanni Boccaccio,[7] is widely considered one of the most important poems of the Middle Ages and the greatest literary work in the Italian language.[8][9]

Dante is known for establishing the use of the vernacular in literature at a time when most poetry was written in Latin, which was accessible only to the most educated readers. His De vulgari eloquentia (On Eloquence in the Vernacular) was one of the first scholarly defenses of the vernacular. His use of the Tuscan dialect for works such as The New Life (1295) and Divine Comedy helped establish the modern-day standardized Italian language. His work set a precedent that important Italian writers such as Petrarch and Boccaccio would later follow.
Dante was born in Florence.
About his education and influences, the Wiki includes, for example:
Not much is known about Dante's education; he presumably studied at home or in a chapter school attached to a church or monastery in Florence. It is known that he studied Tuscan poetry and that he admired the compositions of the Bolognese poet Guido Guinizelli—in Purgatorio XXVI he characterized him as his "father"—at a time when the Sicilian School (Scuola poetica Siciliana), a cultural group from Sicily, was becoming known in Tuscany. He also discovered the Provençal poetry of the troubadours, such as Arnaut Daniel, and the Latin writers of classical antiquity, including Cicero, Ovid and especially Virgil.[21]

Dante's interactions with Beatrice set an example of so-called courtly love, a phenomenon developed in French and Provençal poetry of prior centuries. Dante's experience of such love was typical, but his expression of it was unique. It was in the name of this love that Dante left his imprint on the dolce stil novo ("sweet new style", a term that Dante himself coined), and he would join other contemporary poets and writers in exploring never-before-emphasized aspects of love (Amore). Love for Beatrice (as Petrarch would express for Laura somewhat differently) would be his reason for writing poetry and for living, together with political passions. In many of his poems, she is depicted as semi-divine, watching over him constantly and providing spiritual instruction, sometimes harshly. When Beatrice died in 1290, Dante sought refuge in Latin literature.[22] The Convivio chronicles his having read Boethius's De consolatione philosophiae and Cicero's De Amicitia.

He next dedicated himself to philosophical studies at religious schools like the Dominican one in Santa Maria Novella. He took part in the disputes that the two principal mendicant orders (Franciscan and Dominican) publicly or indirectly held in Florence, the former explaining the doctrines of the mystics and of St. Bonaventure, the latter expounding on the theories of St. Thomas Aquinas.[19]
Next is Francesco Petrarca:
Francesco Petrarca (Italian: [franˈtʃesko peˈtrarka]; 20 July 1304 – 18/19 July 1374), commonly anglicized as Petrarch (/ˈpiːtrɑːrk, ˈpɛt-/), was a scholar and poet of early Renaissance Italy, and one of the earliest humanists.[1]

Petrarch's rediscovery of Cicero's letters is often credited with initiating the 14th-century Italian Renaissance and the founding of Renaissance humanism.[2] In the 16th century, Pietro Bembo created the model for the modern Italian language based on Petrarch's works, as well as those of Giovanni Boccaccio, and, to a lesser extent, Dante Alighieri.[3] Petrarch would be later endorsed as a model for Italian style by the Accademia della Crusca. Petrarch's sonnets were admired and imitated throughout Europe during the Renaissance and became a model for lyrical poetry. He is also known for being the first to develop the concept of the "Dark Ages,"[4] which most modern scholars now find misleading and inaccurate.[5][6][7]
Petrarch was born in Arezzo, 80 km southeast of Florence.

Genes, the Black Death and the Renaissance
There are several comments in this category
What if the real cause of the Renaissance was indeed the Black Death, not so much through the destruction it induced but rather the genetic mutations in the human genome induced by the virus?
One influence are the genes, but the soul is also there:
Q: (L) But isn't the nature of a person determined by their soul and not the physical body?

A: Partially, remember, aural profile and karmic reference merges with physical structure.

Q: (L) So you are saying that particular genetic conditions are a physical reflection of a spiritual orientation? That the soul must match itself to the genetics, even if only in potential?

A: Yes, precisely.
Q: (L) So a person's potential for spiritual advancement or unfoldment is, to a great extent, dependent upon their genes?

A: Natural process marries with systematic construct when present.
Did suffering survivors of the Black Death turn on their DNA in a new way?
Besides DNA changes as a result of viruses, the suffering caused by the changes in society and experienced among the survivors, like Boccaccio and Petrarch, may turn on DNA receptors too.
Q: (R) Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar! {laughter} (A) When I was looking for the right keywords for my chapter, I came across this Matti Pitkanen. And I started to read. And he had all the things that were in my mind or were mentioned by the C's or that I was asking C's ... (L) So did Dan Winter. (A) Well, Matti is a physicist! (L) So is Dan Winter according to his own claims. (A) Ouch! So Matti had all the right things and he knew math; p-adic numbers I learned from him. Complexification, dimensions, quantum jumps even. Where is he getting all this right keywords? What is his role, who makes him to resonate to all the right things? I don't understand what such people do, how they come along with all these things.

A: Suffering activates neuro-chemicals which turn on DNA receptors.
On the Black Death, the rule of three, and the Renaissance
While the Black Death may have influenced how the Renaissance gained traction and unfolded, I am not sure, it caused it. As we have seen, some ideas and people who seeded the Italian Renaissance were born before the Black Death. But if there seems to be many processes at work, does the law of three apply?
(Arky)[...] I want to ask about dialectical logic. There was this guy Hegel. He invented what is called dialectics. It can be summarized like contradictions are important; there is thesis, anti-thesis, and then you have synthesis. Okay... There is idealistic dialectics, materialistic, etc. And of course there are critics saying it's nonsense, that the only good logic is Aristotelian logic, and all this dialectics is just pure nonsense. I would like to have some hint. Should I study dialectic logic and Hegel?

A: Law of Three rules!

Q: (Arky) Law of three?

(Pierre) Thesis, antithesis, synthesis.

(Arky) Okay, I am done.
If I use the law of three on the appearance of the book of Decameron which is a series of stories that take place within the framework of the raging plague in Florence, then I could venture that the social conditions of a creative group of rich and noble young people in Florence (thesis) faced with the destruction of the Black Death ravaging their town (antithesis) led them to leave town and entertain and nourish each other in their country house secluded and removed from the Black Death mayhem (synthesis). I am not sure the Decameron would have seen the light of day without the Black Death. Or one could say that the Decameron exists as an artistic synthesis on the backdrop of the conflict between the remembered good life of the past and the observed suffering by himself and his contemporaries. Here is what the Wiki says:
The Decameron (/dɪˈkæmərən/; Italian: Decameron [deˈkaːmeron, dekameˈrɔn, -ˈron] or Decamerone [dekameˈroːne]), subtitled Prince Galehaut (Old Italian: Prencipe Galeotto [ˈprentʃipe ɡaleˈɔtto, ˈprɛn-]) and sometimes nicknamed l'Umana commedia ("the Human comedy", as it was Boccaccio that dubbed Dante Alighieri's Comedy "Divine"), is a collection of short stories by the 14th-century Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio (1313–1375). The book is structured as a frame story containing 100 tales told by a group of seven young women and three young men; they shelter in a secluded villa just outside Florence in order to escape the Black Death, which was afflicting the city. Boccaccio probably conceived of the Decameron after the epidemic of 1348, and completed it by 1353. The various tales of love in The Decameron range from the erotic to the tragic. Tales of wit, practical jokes, and life lessons contribute to the mosaic. In addition to its literary value and widespread influence (for example on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales), it provides a document of life at the time. Written in the vernacular of the Florentine language, it is considered a masterpiece of classical early Italian prose.[1]
In this post, you can read a description of the plague in Florence from the beginning of the Decameron.

On the subject of fertility and the Black Death
In the German book Die Vernichtung der Weisen Frauen
(The Destruction of the Wise Women.) By Gunnar Heinsohn and Otto Steiger, Ausburg, 2005 (review) they suggest that one important reason the witches were hunted down was because they had knowledge of contraceptives and abortion.

After the plague many workers had died so the powerful landowners and the church needed people to work their lands, not contraceptives and abortion, which allowed for the average people to lead lives and raise children according to their means. This in practical terms meant that they would generate less offspring than fertility provided possibilities - not a popular solution among those who needed labours.
According to the above book, after the Black Death, medicine became increasingly more institutionalized and regulated by the authorities.

The influence on genes from the Black Death virus may not have been a one way street
The following excerpts occur in relation to Coronavirus, RNA vaccinations, and the expected space virus. In the transcripts, it is mentioned that the vaccine has docking elements, and that the virus from space has 4D STS influences. When I read this, I wondered if 4D STS have also influenced previous events like the Black Death. Without trying to answer the question, here are the excepts:
(Ryu) To go back to Pierre's comment, are Covid vaccines used as ethnic weapons?

A: Can be. Docking elements included.

Q: (L) So the vaccine has things in it that are docking elements for later propagation of some kind of pathogen?

A: Yes


Q: (Pierre) And the targeted population is Kantekkians, i.e. true Semites, i.e. Caucasians (in the sense of peoples from the area of the Caucasus).

(L) Targeted in what way? For download, or for the ethnic-specific weapons?

(Pierre) For both. Well, the vaccine. They have a mutation that over-expresses the ACE2 protein. They're more likely to get the effects of the vaccine.

A: Yes

Q: (Joe) Pierre's on an obvious train of thought that Kantekkians are awesome people - that they're the True Semites and stuff. But the Cs just said in this session that people were transferred to that part of Ukraine and they had just destroyed their own planet! [laughter] So, they're not awesome people.

(L) Yeah. The C's also said something about that Nordic Covenant business... That peoples of Nordic descent, i.e. Kantekkian, could be of positive or negative orientation. It's representative of a power center in their genetics...

(Pierre) 'Intensity' was the word used. Kantekkians had more intensity of a certain type of power.

(L) Yeah, intensity. So, yeah.

(Pierre) Intensity for the good, intensity for the bad.

(L) Very interesting. Okay, hold on...
(Regulattor) What about vaccines virus recombinations/mutations, how is that developing? Is it still too early to say how lethal it is going to be?

A: Not the biggest problem.

Q: (L) What IS the biggest problem?

A: Virus from space/4D STS.
The good and the bad, genetic upgrades from viruses and parasites
In the latest session, it is said that while the coronavirus can provide upgrade, parasites are at work at times of major changes, probably to counter any beneficial effects.
Q: (L) Well, going along with that question: Is our current interaction with the coronavirus gonna provide us with any upgrades?

A: In some respects. But remember what was said about parasites at times of major change and remain vigilant and proactive.


Q: (L) In other words, don't just assume that things can go a positive way without taking action yourself. Like hyperbaric chambers or vitamin C or ivermectin, hydroxychloroquine, and all of that.
 

Gandalf

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
And if time allows you to print and sell both, so much the better! I often tend to say that what's done is done and does not need to be done anymore, and I'd rather have at least the first book than no book at all!

But it is only my humble opinion, and maybe others would have other answers.

Agree with that.

And it would be easier for the translators (and for people waiting for the translation) to translate 2 books instead of a huge one.
 

dennis

Jedi Master
Japan's science ministry says more than 20 types of amino acid have been found in samples collected from the Ryugu asteroid. The discovery may help scientists better understand the origins of life, as amino acids are one of its basic building blocks.
...
Amino acids are an essential substance in most forms of life and are thought to have existed since shortly after the Earth was formed.

One theory suggests that they ceased to exist on Earth during a period when the planet became extremely hot but were reintroduced from outer space by meteors.


Wasn't the late Eocene (30-35 million years ago) when Earth transitioned from a greenhouse climate to having alternating climate?

 
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