Another Hit For the Cs: Californian Exodus

Rabelais

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
Exodus out of California

From the November 3, 1994 session:

Expect gradual destruction of California economy as people
begin mass exodus.

Today the Natural News newsletter carries this story:

California wake-up call: Extreme drought will lead to migration exit and real estate collapse


_http://www.naturalnews.com/046289_California_extreme_drought_human_migration.html#ixzz39LGJI1vz

A snip from the article:

Mass migration away from California is inevitable

The inevitability of the mass migration away from California still hasn't quite sunk in among most people who live there. Almost no one has thought about how they might afford to move out of California when the value of their own property in California will be approaching zero.

Lynn Wilson is the academic chair at Kaplan University, and she serves on the climate change delegation in the United Nations. "Civilizations in the past have had to migrate out of areas of drought," she said in a CNBC article. (4) "We may have to migrate people out of California."

Think about it: When the day comes that the water taps run dry across large urban areas, there will be a rush for people to sell their homes and move out of the state. But in this rush, the value of California homes will plummet to nearly nothing. Why's that? Because the value of a home that has no running water and likelihood of ever receiving running water is very close to zero.

There will be no buyers. There will only be sellers. And after the sellers realize they cannot sell, they will simply pack up the minivan and abandon their California properties and send their homes into foreclosure.

Areas of California will become ghost towns, much like many areas of Detroit today.

SNIP

The net result is a mass human migration wave combined with a wave of home loan defaults as homeowners abandon their properties and walk away.

The drought, you see, will ultimately lead to a banking crisis, not just a food crisis.
 

gdpetti

Jedi Council Member
Re: Exodus out of California

That's the entire SW essentially, when that acquafier issue to added in, such as in Texas, which has sort of lost the tradition of conservation in recent decades of 'growth'.
 

Rabelais

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
Re: Exodus out of California

gdpetti said:
That's the entire SW essentially, when that acquafier issue to added in, such as in Texas, which has sort of lost the tradition of conservation in recent decades of 'growth'.

Yup, but when you go immediately east of California and the west coast, the population density drops off dramatically. Its a freaking desert. The 38 million Californians jammed along the thin coastal strip that supports life, with the aid of the Colorado River (now just a trickle of its former self) and underground aquifers (drying up), are going to feel the need to leave the most. But to go where?

Under the plains states, in the middle of the country, where a large portion of the food crops are grown, is the huge Ogallala aquifer, the largest in the country. When the fracking toxins in that region, being pumped into the ground at the current alarming rate, contaminate that water source there won't be many livable places west of the Mississippi River. Between the climate change droughts and the poisoning of the remaining large groundwater reservoirs, the US could be very hard pressed to support anywhere near the current population levels. If you can't water livestock or grow crops you are in trouble. I guess the oil patch thugs figure we'll be able to import all of our food, but it would be nice to be able to bathe in water that's not flammable.
 

domi

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Re: Exodus out of California

Here's another good article: _http://www.sfgate.com/default/article/California-drought-As-land-sinks-farmers-5649466.php#item-31720

Central Valley has been suffering for quite a few years now and one can see how some agricultural land has been abandoned along Hwy 5 because of lack of irrigation water being brought it.

I live close to a drinking water reservoir and it's wild to see the level as low as it is.
This reservoir is being fed locally by the coastal mountains watershed area.

Also, I am part of a local yahoo group and it's been interesting to see requests for water delivery trucks going up because people's wells are underperforming or running dry.

Rabelais said:
Yup, but when you go immediately east of California and the west coast, the population density drops off dramatically. Its a freaking desert.
True. A lot of the Western states are in the rain shadow of the mountain ridges of CA.

Rabelais said:
The 38 million Californians jammed along the thin coastal strip that supports life, with the aid of the Colorado River (now just a trickle of its former self) and underground aquifers (drying up), are going to feel the need to leave the most. But to go where?
And the San Francisco Bay Area relies heavily on the snowpack of the Sierras through Hetch Hetchy.

It's not a pretty picture.
 

MusicMan

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Re: Exodus out of California

Now a canny investor could make a 'killing' by setting up a water desalination plant along the coastal strip. All you need is some solar power plants and /or wind farms to generate the electricity and a reverse osmosis set-up and Bob's your uncle! California is an ideal place for such a set-up, I wonder what the C's have forecast for the future in this area.
Sydney, Australia went through this exercise in recent years during a drought, and the desalination plant has been completed. Only trouble is that when they finished it, the rains came in and filled up the reservoirs, and now the desalination plant is sitting idle.
Still, it's there if we need it!
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Re: Exodus out of California

MusicMan said:
Now a canny investor could make a 'killing' by setting up a water desalination plant along the coastal strip. All you need is some solar power plants and /or wind farms to generate the electricity and a reverse osmosis set-up and Bob's your uncle!
You'd probably want to change the RO filters a lot too, assuming they are filtering all of the radiation from the Pacific.
 

Pashalis

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Re: Exodus out of California

Seems like the situation is California does not get any better:

http://www.naturalnews.com/047329_drought_California_mass_migration.html# said:
14 California communities now on verge of waterless-ness; mass migration out of California seems imminent

(NaturalNews) Unless California gets some heavy rain, and soon, the state's roughly 38 million residents will eventually be up a creek without a paddle -- or without a creek, for that matter. The latest media reports indicate that some 14 communities throughout the state are now on the verge of running completely dry, and many more could join them in the coming year if conditions remain as they are.

A few months ago, the official count was 28 communities bordering on complete waterless-ness, according to the Water Resources Control Board. Those that have since dropped off the list were able to come up with a fix, at least for now. The other 14, though, face an unprecedented resource collapse that could leave thousands of Californians with no other choice but to pack their bags and head to greener pastures.

"It's a sign of how severe this drought is," verbalized Bruce Burton, an assistant deputy director for the board, to the Los Angeles Times about some of the drastic measures being taken. For the first time ever, the water board has begun tracking communities throughout the state that are bordering on complete water loss, a situation that has never before occurred.

Most of the communities on the brink are located in California's Central Valley, the "food basket" of America that The New York Times (NYT) once declared to be the nation's greatest food resource. Most of America's carrots are grown there, as are the bulk of salad greens, almonds and citrus fruits that we all take for granted -- but that could soon disappear due to the continued drought.

'Larger, more sophisticated communities' face total water depletion

In some stricken areas, water facilities have been able to secure temporary supplies from neighboring communities as they figure out longer-term solutions. In Siskiyou County near the Oregon border, the city of Montague was actually able to construct a brand-new irrigation ditch to transport water from a lake 25 miles away, replacing an old ditch that had run dry back in April.

While most of the communities facing total water depletion are relatively small in size, with only a few thousand residents each, the prospect of larger communities also becoming affected is increasingly likely. Tom Quinn, the executive director of the Association of California Water Agencies, says that, if the drought continues, many of the more iconic regions of California will suffer.

"If this drought keeps on going, some larger, more sophisticated communities are going to be in trouble next year," he told the LA Times.


Mountains shifting due to water losses

It isn't just that no new water is coming into California -- underground aquifers and other former backup sources are also running dry. According to research published in the journal Science, the entire Western United states has lost an astounding 240 gigatons of water since 2013, an amount equivalent to 1 billion tons.

In spatial terms, this amount of water could be spread out across the entire Western U.S. in a solid 10-centimeter sheet, constituting about 63 trillion gallons, or enough to fill 75,000 football stadiums. This loss has not only altered the gravitational field of California, according to the study, but also caused mountains throughout the state to rise up out of the ground in some areas.

"100 percent of the state is in drought, with 82 percent of the land designated as in 'extreme' or 'exceptional' drought, the highest levels on the U.S. Drought Monitor scale," explains the National Journal. "Thirty-seven million people are affected by the drought."

Source: _http://www.naturalnews.com/047329_drought_California_mass_migration.html##ixzz3H8hF4AAb

Indeed looks like that could be hit for the C's...
 

Mark

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
There's a lot of talk of California seceding, so I suppose it's possible that it might be what the Cs were referring to.

Here's one of several articles about the proposed secession:

__http://theantimedia.org/49-states-america-california-succession/
 

Séamas

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
m said:
There's a lot of talk of California seceding, so I suppose it's possible that it might be what the Cs were referring to.

Here's one of several articles about the proposed secession:

__http://theantimedia.org/49-states-america-california-succession/
Interesting.... could be! I live in the San Francisco Bay area right now (finishing a degree) and I haven't heard any serious talk about this but I will keep my ears and eyes open and report back here if I come across anything interesting.
 

anartist

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Pashalis said:
Seems like the situation is California does not get any better:

http://www.naturalnews.com/047329_drought_California_mass_migration.html# said:
14 California communities now on verge of waterless-ness; mass migration out of California seems imminent

(NaturalNews) Unless California gets some heavy rain, and soon, the state's roughly 38 million residents will eventually be up a creek without a paddle -- or without a creek, for that matter. The latest media reports indicate that some 14 communities throughout the state are now on the verge of running completely dry, and many more could join them in the coming year if conditions remain as they are.

A few months ago, the official count was 28 communities bordering on complete waterless-ness, according to the Water Resources Control Board. Those that have since dropped off the list were able to come up with a fix, at least for now. The other 14, though, face an unprecedented resource collapse that could leave thousands of Californians with no other choice but to pack their bags and head to greener pastures.

"It's a sign of how severe this drought is," verbalized Bruce Burton, an assistant deputy director for the board, to the Los Angeles Times about some of the drastic measures being taken. For the first time ever, the water board has begun tracking communities throughout the state that are bordering on complete water loss, a situation that has never before occurred.

Most of the communities on the brink are located in California's Central Valley, the "food basket" of America that The New York Times (NYT) once declared to be the nation's greatest food resource. Most of America's carrots are grown there, as are the bulk of salad greens, almonds and citrus fruits that we all take for granted -- but that could soon disappear due to the continued drought.

'Larger, more sophisticated communities' face total water depletion

In some stricken areas, water facilities have been able to secure temporary supplies from neighboring communities as they figure out longer-term solutions. In Siskiyou County near the Oregon border, the city of Montague was actually able to construct a brand-new irrigation ditch to transport water from a lake 25 miles away, replacing an old ditch that had run dry back in April.

While most of the communities facing total water depletion are relatively small in size, with only a few thousand residents each, the prospect of larger communities also becoming affected is increasingly likely. Tom Quinn, the executive director of the Association of California Water Agencies, says that, if the drought continues, many of the more iconic regions of California will suffer.

"If this drought keeps on going, some larger, more sophisticated communities are going to be in trouble next year," he told the LA Times.


Mountains shifting due to water losses

It isn't just that no new water is coming into California -- underground aquifers and other former backup sources are also running dry. According to research published in the journal Science, the entire Western United states has lost an astounding 240 gigatons of water since 2013, an amount equivalent to 1 billion tons.

In spatial terms, this amount of water could be spread out across the entire Western U.S. in a solid 10-centimeter sheet, constituting about 63 trillion gallons, or enough to fill 75,000 football stadiums. This loss has not only altered the gravitational field of California, according to the study, but also caused mountains throughout the state to rise up out of the ground in some areas.

"100 percent of the state is in drought, with 82 percent of the land designated as in 'extreme' or 'exceptional' drought, the highest levels on the U.S. Drought Monitor scale," explains the National Journal. "Thirty-seven million people are affected by the drought."

Source: _http://www.naturalnews.com/047329_drought_California_mass_migration.html##ixzz3H8hF4AAb

Indeed looks like that could be hit for the C's...
Just in regard to the drought, it may be tempoaray but recently heavy rain has refilled the resevoirs, and may be adding to the aquifer also. due to a cooling planet?
 

Rabelais

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
The flight escalates.

Session December 3, 1994
"Expect gradual destruction of California economy as people begin mass exodus..."

SF Gate February 13, 2019
According to a new survey by Edelman Intelligence, 53 percent of Californians are considering moving out of state due to the high cost of living. Millennials are even more likely to flee the Golden State — 63 percent of them said they want to.

Bay Area residents surveyed were especially sensitive to affordability issues, and it's no surprise. The median home value in San Francisco is $1.37 million, according to Zillow, and $1.09 million in San Jose. In Edelman's survey, 76 percent of Bay Area residents say they consider cost and availability of housing to be a serious issue.

ALSO: It's not just people fleeing the Bay Area — these businesses are leaving, too

Sixty-two percent also call homelessness a very serious issue for California.

It appears the housing and homelessness crises have led to a pessimistic outlook: 62 percent of those surveyed say the best days of living in California are behind them.

The trend is backed up by much of SFGATE's past reporting. We've spoken with people who've left California for the Pacific Northwest, Texas and Denver — all popular destinations for Bay Area ex-pats. Nearly everyone we talked to cites the high cost of living as the primary reason they left. Others were looking for a slower pace of life, lower taxes, less traffic and more time with family.
_53 percent of Californians want to leave the state, according to new survey
 

Rabelais

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
Just in regard to the drought, it may be tempoaray but recently heavy rain has refilled the resevoirs, and may be adding to the aquifer also. due to a cooling planet?
Snow pack melt in the Sierra mountains is more crucial for California water supplies than rain. A no-snow winter in the mountains almost guarantees serious water shortages - and grumpy ski resort owners.
 

herondancer

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Snow pack melt in the Sierra mountains is more crucial for California water supplies than rain. A no-snow winter in the mountains almost guarantees serious water shortages - and grumpy ski resort owners.
Doesn't look like California's going to have that problem this year. Now they have to hope for a slow thaw or the flooding and landslides will be horrendous


 
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