Kassiopaea Karaoke

Laura

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I'm putting this in "The Work" category because I think it might be important for keeping folks going when the Work becomes difficult (is it ever not?)

The Type of Singing That Boosts Mood, Immune Function and Reduces Stress

https://www.spring.org.uk/2016/04/the-type-of-singing-that-improves-mood-immune-function-and-reduces-stress.php

Singing in a choir for only one hour can improve mood, reduce stress and even boost immune proteins, a new study finds.

The largest improvements in mood were seen among those suffering with the greatest level of depression and lowest mental wellbeing.

The research involved 193 people whose lives had been touched by cancer and who were members of five different choirs.

Dr Ian Lewis, one of the study’s authors, said:

“These are really exciting findings.

We have been building a body of evidence over the past six years to show that singing in a choir can have a range of social, emotional and psychological benefits, and now we can see it has biological effects too.

We’ve long heard anecdotal evidence that singing in a choir makes people feel good, but this is the first time it’s been demonstrated that the immune system can be affected by singing.

It’s really exciting and could enhance the way we support people with cancer in the future.”

Dr Daisy Fancourt, the study’s first author, said:

“Many people affected by cancer can experience psychological difficulties such as stress, anxiety and depression.

Research has demonstrated that these can suppress immune activity, at a time when patients need as much support as they can get from their immune system.

This research is exciting as it suggests that an activity as simple as singing could reduce some of this stress-induced suppression, helping to improve wellbeing and quality of life amongst patients and put them in the best position to receive treatment.”

Diane Raybould, 64, who was diagnosed with breast cancer and has been singing in a choir since 2010, said:

“Singing in the choir is about more than just enjoyment, it genuinely makes you feel better.

The choir leaders play a huge part of course, but so does the support of the other choir members, the inspirational programme and uplifting songs.

The choir is a family, simple as that.

Having cancer and losing someone to cancer can be very isolating.

With the choir, you can share experiences openly and that is hugely important.”

The study was published in the journal eCancer Medicalscience

Now, as many of you know, we are great advocates of singing together via karaoke or just playing instruments and singing. But I have noticed (and have heard some complaints) that very often, the songs selected for karaoke do not really fit in the "inspirational programme and uplifting songs" category. I think this should definitely be changed.

For millennia, music has been employed to interact positively with the gods, so to say, and I think we can redefine that as interacting positively with the Information Field from which our reality emerges. And so, what is being sung, and how it is sung, may be very important.

On a few occasions, the Cs have given some small hints about this indicating that the Western scale is most beneficial and that melodic, harmonic songs are optimal. I think we should take those hints seriously.

Considering the fact that quite a number of people are going through some dramatic changes as a result of iodine therapy activating their endocrine gland interface with higher levels, perhaps singing should be considered one of the methods that can be utilized to ease this passage?

If you have never sung in a choir or chorus, you might wonder what kinds of songs lend themselves to choral arrangements other than religious songs? I sang in chorus for two years in high school and, as I recall, the trend was show tunes from Oklahoma, South Pacific, Camelot, old songs and spirituals; also things like "Blue Spanish Eyes", "Hawaiian Wedding Song" "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" cowboy ballads, madrigals, folk songs. Essentially we sang about anything that was melodic and could be arranged for different voices.

Now, obviously, I'm not saying that we need to create choirs, I'm just saying that perhaps a different approach to karaoke needs to be taken: like careful selection of songs, group singing of the selected song(s) possibly numerous times until it really sounds good; trying out harmonies and using the different voices creatively, etc.

In short, karaoke should NOT be just a self-gratifying free for all where anything goes. It has a purpose and that purpose is very serious.
 

wanderingthomas

Jedi Master
Just to share my experience - I have been under high levels of stress for several months now so at one point of my iodine therapy I was just alone at home and started singing a couple of these Americana/neofolk songs that have a clear vocal melody, they're not particularly cheerful but very sing-able.

Since then, I have had numerous times when it feels like my body is almost physically asking me to sing. For a couple of times my mind was thinking something like: "When is my roommate gonna leave so I can sing?" Cause you can literally feel physically better after singing, the effects are similar for me to that of eiriu eolas, it feels very relaxing and emotionally cleansing.
 

aragorn

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Good idea!

What I come to think of right away, is that besides the usual karaoke sessions with people just "hanging out" and having fun singing, there could/should be more serious karaoke/singing workshops, without any extra hassle and noise. In these workshops people could practice the song several times, trying to become better at it. When I say better, I'm thinking of both technical and emotional aspects; those two compliment each other. If you have a better command of your singing voice, you're more free to express your emotions in singing, and doing real interpretation. And with easier singing, it's more enjoyable, too. And, just my guess, but the better you get at it, the more "therapeutic" it will be.

The best way would of course to have some guidance with singing. Those who are more experienced in singing could teach others. Having taught singing for over 20 years, I know it isn't an easy task, but e.g. by just breathing right (with the diaphragm), supporting the voice with the right muscles (transverse abdominal muscles) and relaxing the jaw and neck will get you pretty far.

I'll have to think about this some more, this got me inspired! :)

Here's "Over the Rainbow" for you guys to practice ;):


https://youtu.be/f5apwhqIeMY
 

Siberia

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Aragorn said:
The best way would of course to have some guidance with singing. Those who are more experienced in singing could teach others. Having taught singing for over 20 years, I know it isn't an easy task, but e.g. by just breathing right (with the diaphragm), supporting the voice with the right muscles (transverse abdominal muscles) and relaxing the jaw and neck will get you pretty far.

Something like Seth Riggs' Speech Level Singing trainings might be helpful too, perhaps? There are many related YouTube videos with his explanations and recommendations, like this for example:


https://youtu.be/WGREQ670LrU

Hope this helps, fwiw.
 

Juba

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Thank you Laura, it's really interesting topic.

Currently in our group home live three adults, we all sing and play guitars, with the time we noticed that singing and playing instruments together is much more soothing than using karaoke machine and singing in a mic. At first we were singing whatever "touched us" like; oldies, soft rock or traditional dalmatian songs, etc. But than we decided that we would like to take one song at the time and practice in order to sound more in unison and to adjust our musical and vocal possibilities, so we spend lot of time together practicing. Right now we are practicing Bob Dylan's "Knockin On Heavens Door" and can do this for hours. :-[
Perhaps this song is not the best choice, but it's simple, easy to play, chords are easy (G, D, Am7 and C), and nice to sing in mix of: soprano, mezzo-soprano and tenor.

At the beginning our performance was, well, at least to say, we resembled to a pack of wolves or cats in February (and perhaps even worst than that), and we were kind a stiff and timid and definitely embarrassed by our performance, that kind of things. But now, after first chord we really relax and fell much better, like having a boost of energy and joy in a couple of minutes. Oh, yes and there is another thing, we noticed that with musical improvement and practice we kinda understand eachother more. I certainly can't speak for Dakota or my husband, but we are much more harmonious than before. Perhaps it's not only music, Iodine and keto probably did a great part in it, together with rest of the "work", but for sure it make me wonder how big is the influence of group singing.

There is an interesting text on SOTT, about musician's brain sync while playing duet, adding to it singing all together is definitely big thing.

PS: I'm not a good singer or a good guitar player, but I really enjoy to sing and play guitar together with people in my household.

http://www.sott.net/article/254192-Musicians-brains-sync-up-during-duet
 

Chad

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Singing in a choir at primary school was something which took me out of my comfort zone - my parents were happy to sing, and yet were quick to laugh when we did.

We were lucky enough to sing at the 'broken/hollow tooth church'/Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church in Berlin, but what i remember vividly was our teachers singing, though i couldn't help but giggle (behave like my parents) the sound gave me shivers and, though it took me 10 years to find it again, it's still a favourite of mine; still moves me in the same way.

Gaudete
Coral Polifónica Sagrada Familia (Sa-Fa)


https://youtu.be/QMXCbIcPmr8

Overall, i prefer choral and Gregorian and polyphony/harmonic style singing to musicals. For me musicals sound too cheesy - probably because i did a lot of musical theatre, didn't really enjoy that they sang all the time and belittled the experience (for me anyway).

Also, though i'm not sure it's in the western scale, because i don't know music technically, i think there are immense advantages to trying it out.

The following styles i adore and think could be simplified. It's probably not too different to the choral above:



https://youtu.be/-pLwcM6D42U

Uploaded on Sep 1, 2011

This how Georgian and Corsican Polyphonies are similar.

Pre-Indoeuropean peoples have a lot in common. If Georgian and Basque languages have similar words and grammatic bonds, then here we see Georgian and Corsican polyphony sound similar to each other. As of Corsican language being Indoeuropean then it never means that Corsicans themselves are Indoeuropeans, since the tribe of Corsos , their ancestors have non-Indoeuropean roots.



So i prefer choral, but should i choose a version of 'over the rainbow' - this easily wins for me:


Somewhere Over the Rainbow by Israel Kamakawiwo'Ole


https://youtu.be/fahr069-fzE


When i couldn't benefit from the whole EE program - due to compression round my throat and chest - singing was one of the few ways i could stimulate my vagus nerve (osit). And i will sing at the drop of a hat - probably to help with the harder emotions i can feel. The first time i did karaoke was in the last 2 years, i was too self-important and paranoid before (with reason, the laughing parents). Now i think i have to be wary of being self-indulgent. I perform to release, not for attention, but either way, distracting from the objective or others is doing that regardless of my intention. Same goes with song choices, what i like isn't always what is best - and as mentioned in the OP, much modern music doesn't include holding notes to reap the benefit; plus the lyrics are vile.

So all in all, i agree. There was a reason choirs were for the poor people. It probably stimulated them in a spiritual way no other actions could, and why churches were designed to amplify this sensation. Which can and was used for good and ill.

And i think there are different ways of enjoying it - some in a more sing song, dance along kind of way, as well as the more sombre way where you place effort in being skillful. Both have benefits imo. Either way, it can bond you together in ways other activities can't. Resonance probably - and removing self importance. I know a few people who've joined choirs in recent years - it seems many younger people are searching for something that singing seems to give.


I will try to find the fun video and post later - it's a bunch of school kids in Uganda, singing and dancing to the rhythm, but they're in time and tune and it's so playful and joyful. I can't find it right now, but i have it downloaded.
 

Adaryn

The Living Force
itellsya said:
Overall, i prefer choral and Gregorian and polyphony/harmonic style singing to musicals. For me musicals sound too cheesy - probably because i did a lot of musical theatre, didn't really enjoy that they sang all the time and belittled the experience (for me anyway).

Well, I too prefer that kind of traditional singing to musicals, I find it more "profound" and inspirational, but that's just personal taste I guess. Speaking of Georgian music, I love how they combine singing and dances, this is pretty cool and quite uplifting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCjClSWkHJc
 

Konstantin

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I usually play guitar, especially when I feel depressed or feel not so good. Few years ago, maybe 15-20 years ago when I was at coledge, I have some friends who played instruments very well and lot of time we played on guitars and keyboards and also sing in the same time. I like that feeling of singing and playing instruments in a group. It have some special feeling that I don't know how to explain. It feels like it have some theurapethiic effect.
 

Yas

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Thanks for the post Laura!

Interestingly, even though I like singing very much I almost never did it until recently. About two weeks ago I just felt this need to sing and I started practicing with Amazing Grace, which has an immense effect in me. Since I haven't got a microphone I record myself and then I listen, trying to improve each time. I wondered if I was loosing my time with it, but I don't know, I just think it's an excellent activity to connect with something sacred (Amazing Grace) and to stimulate the vagus nerve in a fun and challenging way (because I know I'm not a good singer so I really have to make an effort to tune my voice and breathe correctly :lol: ).

I tried with other pop songs too, which are fun to sing, but I also have this idea that what I'm singing has to be meaningful and I really don't like some of the lyrics of pop music. And then I couldn't think about any other good songs to sing, so I think it could be nice to list some songs here.

I suppose that the whole idea is to sing together, that's where the real benefits are. But singing alone and practicing to become better does seem to be a good activity as well, OSIT.
 

Laura

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Adaryn said:
itellsya said:
Overall, i prefer choral and Gregorian and polyphony/harmonic style singing to musicals. For me musicals sound too cheesy - probably because i did a lot of musical theatre, didn't really enjoy that they sang all the time and belittled the experience (for me anyway).

Well, I too prefer that kind of traditional singing to musicals, I find it more "profound" and inspirational, but that's just personal taste I guess. Speaking of Georgian music, I love how they combine singing and dances, this is pretty cool and quite uplifting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCjClSWkHJc

The question at this point is not so much what one prefers, but what one can do. Can you walk in a room of trained choir singers and join and sing your part? If not, you have to start where you CAN start.
 

Chad

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Laura said:
Adaryn said:
itellsya said:
Overall, i prefer choral and Gregorian and polyphony/harmonic style singing to musicals. For me musicals sound too cheesy - probably because i did a lot of musical theatre, didn't really enjoy that they sang all the time and belittled the experience (for me anyway).

Well, I too prefer that kind of traditional singing to musicals, I find it more "profound" and inspirational, but that's just personal taste I guess. Speaking of Georgian music, I love how they combine singing and dances, this is pretty cool and quite uplifting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCjClSWkHJc

The question at this point is not so much what one prefers, but what one can do. Can you walk in a room of trained choir singers and join and sing your part? If not, you have to start where you CAN start.

OK, i just put these together, before the comment, which i take on board and think the below are still relevant, and doable. Let me know though.


a few more ideas:

- another favourite which could be adapted for non-gospel singers - and quite apt for the forum :) :

This little light of mine - Corrina, Corrina / Una moglie per papà Soundtrack

https://youtu.be/7d2MbRpjiOc


And a brilliant German choir who have a selection but this is the first i found - girls and boys and modern - and probably easier for all:

German Orthodox Chants - Deutsch Orthodoxe Gesänge

https://youtu.be/-mipUQ0tzx4


This one you don't need to know the words:

Ambrosian chant - Alleluia. Hodie in Bethlehem puer natus est

https://youtu.be/yZ_woagXXuM


Russian orthodox seems to have the right idea - and i love singing along to this - the following songs can make you lightheaded quite quickly, plus a fun way to learn Russian? ;) - it may be tougher but i don't think you need to attempt all the notes, you can hold:

Agni Parthene - Valaam Brethren Choir

https://youtu.be/C7vvPXz-Qes



As i say, i may be off and picking songs too difficult - to be fair, at karaoke i chose Whitney Houston...........! I do think the German song, and obviously 'this little light of mine' are simple enough (as i say, not attempting Gospel).
 

Adaryn

The Living Force
Yas said:
I tried with other pop songs too, which are fun to sing, but I also have this idea that what I'm singing has to be meaningful and I really don't like some of the lyrics of pop music. And then I couldn't think about any other good songs to sing, so I think it could be nice to list some songs here.

I too think the lyrics are very important; some current pop songs seem fun to sing, but most lyrics are crap, only focusing on the superficial aspect of life, on sex, on materialistic values, so I'd say it's not a good thing to sing those kinds of songs, even if they're catchy.
That's why in terms of lyrics, maybe we should focus more on traditional, older songs. Simple songs with simple but beautiful melodies and simple lyrics, but lyrics which sound true and which are emotional, in a good/positive way.
Some ideas: songs that talk about the beauty of nature or of one's country, like The Dark Island by Mary Duff, or Loch Lomond, a traditional Scottish song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rbb9aRSQpsY&nohtml5=False (I never heard this song before, apart from an instrumental version, and when looking at the lyrics, I realised one of the verses was actually the title of a chapter of the Wave :-))
Or songs that promote healthy values, compassion, solidarity, etc. For ie, On the turning away by Pink Floyd.

ADD: I think Auld Lang syne would be pretty good too: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acxnmaVTlZA&nohtml5=False (remembering the final scene from Downton abbey, where they all sing together)

Laura said:
Can you walk in a room of trained choir singers and join and sing your part? If not, you have to start where you CAN start.

Yeah, true.
 

Laura

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I have some old books of folk songs so maybe I'll make a first pass at putting a song book together that can be added to or subtracted from.
 
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