Got Any Pet Health Questions?

Cristal

Padawan Learner
Very sorry to hear about your cat. :hug2:

It's true that kitties often won't eat if the pancreas is inflamed or if there are problems with the liver. Pancreatitis is also very painful. Don't know what kind of painkillers the cat was given, but ask your vet about spasmolytics (antispasmodics), like Drotaverine. Many painkillers are NSAIDs, and although they can be helpful, they can also cause damage. But your vet may not be using antispasmodics like this in his practice. Don't know.

Personal observation is that many cats won't eat if the are in pain, and often antispasmodics help.

Also, better not to give tuna or any fish, but try giving cooked chicken. The muscle, not the skin.

Also look if you can buy pure rose hip syrup. Don't worry about the sugar content. It is high in vit c and other beneficial elements, and will assist with excreting bile and maintaining liver health.
Thank you @Keit for your reply! My vet prescribed sublingual Buprenorphine, which is quite difficult to administer . I will try to suggest to give an antispasmodic.
Is sodium ascorbat good for the cats? I will try to find the the rosehip syrup anyway.
About food,he doesn't want to eat anything else but a little tuna(he eats a very small quantity). I tried to give him chicken and he was not interested. Maybe when he'll get better I will try to switch to raw food, as I saw a recipe on this forum.
Thank you so much for the advice!!
 

Keit

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Thank you @Keit for your reply! My vet prescribed sublingual Buprenorphine, which is quite difficult to administer . I will try to suggest to give an antispasmodic.
Yeah, try asking for an antispasmodic, even if will be given in injection. It is more effective this way.

As for giving pills, there are a lot of videos that describe how to do it on Youtube. Here's one of them:


If the pill is sublingual, than just put it under a tongue, when you'll see his tongue moving around in the mouth. :-D

Is sodium ascorbat good for the cats?
Sure. If you have a powder form, it depends on how much you have in a scoop, but you can give 250 mg for 4.5 kg twice daily. Dissolve it in water and give it with syringe in the way that is described in the video.

About food,he doesn't want to eat anything else but a little tuna(he eats a very small quantity). I tried to give him chicken and he was not interested.
What about turkey or eggs? Or maybe a least evil pate for pets with a low fat content? It's important that he eats, especially if he has a fatty liver.
 
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Cristal

Padawan Learner
Yeah, try asking for an antispasmodic, even if will be given in injection. It is more effective this way.

As for giving pills, there are a lot of videos that describe how to do it on Youtube. Here's one of them:


If the pill is sublingual, than just put it under a tongue, when you'll see his tongue moving around in the mouth. :-D



Sure. If you have a powder form, it depends on how much you have in a scoop, but you can give 250 mg for 4.5 kg twice daily. Dissolve it in water and give it with syringe in the way that is described in the video.



What about turkey or eggs? Or maybe a least evil pate for pets with a low fat content? It's important that he eats, especially if he has a fatty liver.
Thank you!! :-)
 

Persej

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Is it ok to give iodine to a cat that has pneumonia? Asking for a friend.
 

domi

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
As for giving pills, there are a lot of videos that describe how to do it on Youtube. Here's one of them:
Something that really works for us is crushing up the pill in a small amount of baby food (turkey/chicken).
Tried pill pockets, but that only works for so long because they get tired of the flavor and consistency (doughy).

In the US, there is a brand called Fussy Cat where the wet food works great for mixing in medication (up to point since we're dealing with cats afterall).
 

Persej

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Cats don't tolerate much iodine, and actually excessive intake can lead to hyperthyroidism. But in some cases it can be indeed helpful, if the kitty is deficient. But it requires careful examination of the cat and all the available information about the cat.
Thank you Keit.
 

JEEP

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I would like to inquire about the use of liposomal vitamin C for dogs. My 13 year old labradoodle got a scratch on his eye for which he was prescribed an antibiotic ointment. Recheck showed the eye was trying to heal, but a defect was preventing that. A difference antibiotic ointment was prescribed, but problem has persisted, worst than ever. The recommended treatment now is a procedure using a diamond burr to make a grid pattern on the eye that should increase the likelihood of healing. Since it's the weekend, I have to wait till Monday to get an appointment with the recommended veterinary ophthalmologist. I got the impression that this procedure wasn't definitely a sure thing, and that there is a danger of losing the eye if healing can't be achieved. Consequently, I'm wondering if I can give my dog liposomal vitamin C to aid the healing process. I have my own supply of 1400 mg capsules. He weighs around 63 lbs. If it's safe to administer, would one a day be alright?

Thanks in advance.
 

JEEP

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Found this on the net:
How much vitamin C can I give my dog?
[...] medium and large dogs, up to 750 mg. twice daily.
So, I've started him on one 1400 mg capsule a day along with continued Terramycin ointment three times a day. I got an email back from OSU vet ophthalmologist and looks probable dog can be seen in clinic on Wednesday - tech will call me on Monday. I also found this info that describes what my local vet told me about the condition:
Disorders Associated with Chronic Corneal Ulceration
Refractory ulcers typically result from an unresolved underlying etiology. A thorough history, physical examination, and ocular examination must be performed to exclude possible causes of delayed healing before treatment choices are made. Common disorders associated with refractory corneal ulceration include adnexal disease such as entropion or ectopic cilia, corneal exposure such as with exophthalmos, facial nerve paralysis, or abnormal eyelid conformation, keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS), corneal edema due to endothelial degeneration or dystrophy, and corneal accumulation of lipid or mineral.

In middle-aged to older patients (typically 8 years or older), indolent ulceration and spontaneous chronic corneal epithelial defect (SCCED) are the most common reasons superficial ulcers fail to heal. Boxers and golden retrievers are more commonly affected than other breeds. No matter the cause of the initial ulcer, SCCEDs fail to resolve due to abnormal corneal healing from lack of adhesion of the epithelium to the underlying stroma. This is due not only to a deficiency in adhesion molecules but also to development of acellular material within the ulcer bed that physically blocks new epithelial cells from attaching.
[...]
Treatment of SCCEDs
Middle-aged to older dogs with SCCEDs require corneal debridement in addition to the recommendations above in order to achieve healing. You must be certain of your diagnosis before attempting a corneal debridement, which can cause a deep ulcer to perforate or drive infection deeper into the cornea if performed inappropriately. Consult with an ophthalmologist if you have any questions. Corneal debridement can be performed on the awake patient with the help of an experienced assistant to provide head and body restraint or under sedation, whichever is your preference.

The cornea should be gently rinsed and disinfected with 1:20 up to 1:50 dilute betadine solution before applying topical anesthetic. Mechanical debridement with a sterile, dry cotton-tip applicator is performed next, applying mild pressure in sweeping or circular motions targeting the ulcer bed, edges, and adjacent cornea to remove any nonadhered epithelium. The ulcer often becomes a few millimeters larger in this stage, which is important to determine the true extent of abnormal tissue. Once the cotton tip applicator becomes moist, it often loses friction with the cornea and should be discarded. Repeat the process, utilizing a new dry sterile swab as necessary until no further tissue can be removed. Subsequently, a grid keratotomy or diamond burr debridement can be performed, making sure to treat the entire ulcer bed as well as 1 to 2 mm past the edge of the ulcer. Recent studies describing diamond burr debridement and grid keratotomy report a >90 percent healing rate in 10 to 15 days following a single treatment. Punctate keratotomy has fallen out of favor among ophthalmologists due to the development of safer alternatives, such as the diamond burr. It is important to avoid contacting the eyelids or third eyelid with your needle or burr tip. If contact occurs, use a new needle or burr tip to avoid seeding bacteria into the freshly debrided cornea.
 
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