What will you be planting this year according to the diet

Breo

Jedi Council Member
As I'm getting ready for planting this year in my organic garden, I wonder what to plant according to our diet. Considering the reduce of plant intake and what is written about oxalate plants http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php?topic=18824.0 there are different aspects to consider.

My plan for this year is still small in variety compared to the last years:
Amaranth (grows easily, is robust and a beautiful plant though needs space)
Pumpkins, Squash, onions, garlic, broccoli, fennel, carrots, beans, different herbs and tobacco to give it a try.

What will you be planting?
 

rrraven

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
well there is perennials

growing in my garden so far
raspberries, chokos, asparagus, echinacea, purple potatoes, strawberries, blood orange, sage, thyme, lemon grass, tansy, fat hen, cherry tomatoes(self seeded growing like a weed)flat parsley (also self seeded) passion fruit, valerian

as it is autumn here so I have some broccoli, bok choy and kale in(a lot of the kale goes to the meat rabbits) I need some blueberry bushes ,will plant peas and carrots,some lettuce basil and coriander
I was considering getting some cuttings of warrigal greens from my neighbour
but a quick research-http://thebegavalley.org.au/21549.html showed high oxalate levels and funny enough this
Origin:
It is native to New Zealand, Australia, Japan, Chile and Argentina.

Anecdotal:
Warrigal: Wolflike yellowish-brown wild singing dog of Australia. The dingo!

Rarely used by Māori or other indigenous people as a leaf vegetable, was first mentioned by Captain Cook. It was immediately picked, cooked, and pickled to help fight scurvy, and taken with the crew of the Endeavour. It spread when the explorer and botanist Joseph Banks took seeds back to Kew Gardens during the latter half of the 18th century. For two centuries T.tetragonioides was the only cultivated vegetable that originated from Australia and New Zealand.
they knew to keep off the green stuff and have the meat/seafood instead :P
 

kujo

Jedi
As a suggestion for those who will post after this, perhaps include the growing location, if not the exact, the type of zone.

In Upper Michigan, which has a short growing season, and temperatures in the Summer averaging in the 70's, we're considering lots of beans, lettuce, and root vegetables... Tomato's tend to be a pain for many gardener's up here, but we're gonna give it another try this year.

Last year with the help of many hands we dug up grass, tilled the soil underneath, added humus and grass shaving to enrich the soil, and built a little fence to keep the bunnies out. (sorry bunnies)

We planted a quarter of the garden butter crunch lettuce, an eighth swiss chard, eighth spinach, a quarter beans, and the remainder radish, small yellow onions, carrots, cabbage, and a few zucchini plants.

The carrots, and cabbage did poorly. However the swiss chard and other lettuces did really well. Along with the beans and herbs that we planted. Cherry tomatoes did alright, but it wasn't very fruitful. I think the real hearty greens will be my focus this year.

With all that we learned last year, we've got some new ideas for this season. The snow is still covering most everything here, however, on the first of April while sitting outside in the morning, I noticed some new blades of grass coming up, so we're not too far away.

Although not quite "plantable", we'll be making accomodations for a few laying hens this Spring.

Who else is gardening in a similar climate?
 

Nimue

Padawan Learner
Hello ,

I plant in Lower Saxony, short warm summers, and cold winters (this is a challenge sometimes) following plants:

Lettuce, french beans, carrots, squash, gherkin, cucumber, leek, later… broccoli, brussels sprouts, white cabbage and borecole.
 

Breo

Jedi Council Member
@ Katie Jo: Including the growing location, if not the exact, the type of zone is indeed a good idea for sharing planting suggestions :)

I live in humid continental climate:
Wiki says:
the mean temperature of the coldest month be below −3 °C (26.6 °F) [..], there be at least four months with mean temperatures at or above 10 °C (50 °F).[..]The "humid" designation only denotes that the climate is not dry enough to be classified semi-arid or arid, not that humidity levels are necessarily high.

I repost from the oxalate thread the foods, which are:

SUPER HIGH OXALATE:

Spinach Lime peel Chocolate
Soy protein Rhubarb Instant coffee
Tofu Swiss chard Leeks
Peanuts Parsley Tea
Peanut butter Sweet potatoes Okra
Pecans Pokeweed Wheat germ
Lemon peel Black pepper

I wonder if Sweet potatoes being high in Oxalate has been discussed on the forum. I could not find info about it.

@rraven
Interesting, that the Maori "keep off the green stuff and have the meat/seafood instead".
Hm, what will we plant then :huh: and tomatoes and potatoes are nightshades, I will leave them out this year.
 

seekr

Jedi
As I live in a flat with only patio space and also have converted to mostly meat diet, I planted herbs only. Basil, Sage, Rosemary, Chives, Cilantro, Italian Oregano and Thyme.

I'm currently in Upstate SC, USA but in 2 weeks will be moving to KC, MO, USA, for a few months (leaving at first snow). The herbs will be going with me so I hope they like a road trip :P
 

Rabelais

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
Breo said:
I wonder if Sweet potatoes being high in Oxalate has been discussed on the forum. I could not find info about it.


This is a very good question as I have cultivated all winter a nice sweet potato vine which would be the basic planting for a sweet potato patch.

Is it possible that oxalate consumption in moderate doses is balanced out by the other nutritional benefits of the given plant?

As it now stands, I am looking at a garden this season that is dominated by root vegetables... potatoes, carrots, parsnips, turnip, onion, beets, etc. My only leafy greens are looking like nicotiana rustica and nicotiana tabacum.
 

Voyageur

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Well not exactly planting for diet as I can get these things from the farmers market more readily then the garden, but this year picked up Tobacco seeds (Hopi) and have done a little reading and am now waiting for the last of the snow & frost to leave (sure hope it does) and will start preparing the particular garden. Expectation may not be the best for this climatic zone but will give it a try.
 

Breo

Jedi Council Member
Rabelais said:
This is a very good question as I have cultivated all winter a nice sweet potato vine which would be the basic planting for a sweet potato patch.

Is it possible that oxalate consumption in moderate doses is balanced out by the other nutritional benefits of the given plant?

As it now stands, I am looking at a garden this season that is dominated by root vegetables... potatoes, carrots, parsnips, turnip, onion, beets, etc. My only leafy greens are looking like nicotiana rustica and nicotiana tabacum.

Thanks for sharing. I just started to put several sweet potatoes into water to get them growing :)
Seems like -to be on the safe side- to concentrate on growing root vegetables.

Parallax said:
Well not exactly planting for diet as I can get these things from the farmers market more readily then the garden, but this year picked up Tobacco seeds (Hopi) and have done a little reading and am now waiting for the last of the snow & frost to leave (sure hope it does) and will start preparing the particular garden. Expectation may not be the best for this climatic zone but will give it a try.

Could the more experienced tobacco gardeners tell us about their experience and tips? I started indoor seeding already.
 

Voyageur

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
[quote author=Breo]

Could the more experienced tobacco gardeners tell us about their experience and tips? I started indoor seeding already.
[/quote]

No experience here, just a first attempt and a work in progress. I called the grower of the seed's that were picked up and was essentially told that, for our climate zone, to keep the beds well drained and utilize sand in your rows (thin layer), planting the seeds on the surface and covering lightly as they propagate from the top down. Worked the gardens the last few weeks and laid out a number of rows and seeded. The grower said to plant or thin to 2 foot centers and they should do well.

Have my fingers crossed; its been unusually cold here so hopefully the germination process will work. :/

If it grows, then will need to follow the steps for curing - have no idea yet about cutting cured tobacco without the larger agricultural mechanisms.
 

Kaigen

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Here in south Japan, I planted this year:
Potatoes, tomatoes, mini tomatoes, Zucchini, pumpkin, cucumber, parsley, cabbage, kale flower, broccoli, strawberries, radish, shingiku, negi, melon, watermelon, basil, rosemary, oregano, bell pepper, green peas, giant peas, Goya and some more Japanese sorts.
This year is really difficult, because of the weather. Long cold winter and cold spring.

I must add, here temp. Is not going below 0 Celsius in winter, in summer hottest will be 38 Celsius.
 

ginebra

Jedi Council Member
This year, I have planted Tomatoes, green peppers, cucumber, egg plant, garlic,onnion,lettuce,melon ,watermelon, etc.Regarding fruits it was a good season for
cherry,plum, pear and apricot.
 

Voyageur

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
[quote author=Breo]
Could the more experienced tobacco gardeners tell us about their experience and tips? I started indoor seeding already.
[/quote]

Just to continue Breo, not as an experienced grower in anyway. Here it is August and the Tobacco planted ranges in size; nothing over 1ft. It has only been in the last few weeks that it has started to noticeably grow.

 

EGVG

Dagobah Resident
This year I'm planting for the first time since I was in high school! I'm really exited! :) :cool:
I'm planting Carrots, Lettuce, Rosemary, Lavender, Mint and Thyme, I really don't have space for more, I'm also transplanting my Aloe Vera new born, the mother one has produced a little sprout that needs a home of it's own :)
 
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