STRANGE CLOUDS

jess

Jedi
Today in the afternoon I went with my husband and daughter for a road drive in the Waynesville area -Ohio- , and I saw a huge thick cloud and I followed it and photographed it from the car with my old iphone 6, I got some strange pictures; the sunlight just before sunset was so intense that it over exposed the picture, besides getting a 1- strange effect that I can't locate the possible origin of the change in the image of the shot. All the shots were from the car in motion.
172069620_221006089817302_4794500380404315626_n.jpg174013063_1389427548099658_3621351834339783431_n.jpg

The following shot has an exposure effect due to the moving car and you can see the objects that were deformed in the shot resulting in a double figure.
171854730_901394250717391_3353098445328560211_n.jpg
Detail of the same photograph
Screen Shot 2021-04-17 at 8.57.36 PM.png

Now, the "strange" effect that I can't locate the possible origin of the change in the image of the shot.
174525671_383947835960564_1178921239445099956_n.jpg
Detail of the same photograph
Screen Shot 2021-04-17 at 8.55.02 PM.pngScreen Shot 2021-04-17 at 8.55.52 PM.png

Sunset was so intense that it over exposed the picture
172773866_249190636987601_3517006650986061557_n.jpg173169853_979829309221889_255720352135155098_n.jpg173749271_3035505463348403_6757321175154452867_n.jpg

Then other photos taken not from the front of the sun, it from the part that reflects the sunlight, it is totally another illumination (the darkness of the image was not perceived as such in the "reality", it is only as the camera of the phone overexposed the photograph of the light received from the sunlight, it was too intense) and others of the final setting with red shades. It was a very rare experience.

175312184_163938955606789_4288585526357211696_n.jpg174235705_143019021038076_1665740242212165868_n.jpg
 

jess

Jedi
wow!!! Today I found this news in SOTT, I wonder if it could be part of the same phenomenon, this that I observed in the previous post was that same day, with the time difference between Europe and USA.
The amazing 'fireballs' over North Wales which have left plenty of people puzzled -- Sott.net


Attached is a comment from a reader of the same article.

Heosphorus

Heosphorus · about 17 hours ago
I know how this fellow feels.
He wrote: "HELP. Did anyone else witness this as the Sun was setting tonight 16th April 2021? Can anyone explain this please?"
I was driving a cab in the early 2000s one night in Las Vegas. The mountain range to our west is called Spring Mountains. The entire western sky became lit up like day in front of Spring Mountains. Like daylight. Not partially. Not quasi. The entire area became as if daylight. As if we were in the middle of day...but Las Vegas was still dark with neon lights.

We all got on the radio they had in cabs at that time going "What the hell? Did you see that? What was that?" Dispatch called police; they had no answer. Nellis Air Force didn't know (yeah, sure, buddy). I saw nothing on the news about the event.
 

XPan

Jedi Council Member
Today in the afternoon I went with my husband and daughter for a road drive in the Waynesville area -Ohio- , and I saw a huge thick cloud and I followed it and photographed it from the car with my old iphone 6, I got some strange pictures; the sunlight just before sunset was so intense that it over exposed the picture, besides getting a 1- strange effect that I can't locate the possible origin of the change in the image of the shot. All the shots were from the car in motion.
View attachment 44639View attachment 44640

The following shot has an exposure effect due to the moving car and you can see the objects that were deformed in the shot resulting in a double figure.
View attachment 44641
Detail of the same photograph
View attachment 44642

Now, the "strange" effect that I can't locate the possible origin of the change in the image of the shot.
View attachment 44643
Detail of the same photograph
View attachment 44644View attachment 44645

Sunset was so intense that it over exposed the picture
View attachment 44646View attachment 44647View attachment 44648

Then other photos taken not from the front of the sun, it from the part that reflects the sunlight, it is totally another illumination (the darkness of the image was not perceived as such in the "reality", it is only as the camera of the phone overexposed the photograph of the light received from the sunlight, it was too intense) and others of the final setting with red shades. It was a very rare experience.

View attachment 44649View attachment 44650

The camera makes a HDR photo

which means in super rapid succession takes several photos, and then combines those into one photo. The aim of this is - to iron out too large contrasts between light and dark, so that within highlights (very light areas) details can still be show details (which normally with a single shot, would blow out (become white, without details)

However, if you - like in a car while driving - take photos - you get that "double" very effect, because for each shot, the car has moved (or the user) - and thereby isn't aligning properly anymore.


Mobile phones and their software voodoo

are prone to give other strange effects, everything from colors or shades that were not present to the naked eye (or not seen as strong), and other artifacts. (Hard compressed jpeg's also introduce color artifacts by the way)

I have noticed on my iPhone XS Max, that when I take images of prominent thunderstorm clouds against a blue sky, where head (top) part is strongly illuminated by the sun - and the rest of the cloud is in the shadows - the iPhone makes the sky look unnatural uneven. (instead of just showing a blue sky without any kind of unevenness). It actually makes the blue sky around the white cloud itself, darker than the rest - which looks strange (once your eye has noticed that effect from the mobile phone software voodoo)

So, for me the iPhone is pretty useless for authentic cloud photography (in my opinion) - and I don't use it on Thunderstorm clouds, with high contrast against a very even illuminated skies.


Here is an illustration

taken with an iPhone 7 Plus over Milazzo, Northern Sicily on 25 May 2018 on a cloud against what was a totally evenly lit blue sky. The software however creates a dark surrounding to the cloud boll... which was not there. In order to make your eye more sensitive to the effect - I have surrounded the image with a grey area.

2018-05-25-10-16-26.jpg


Another very common effect: Flares

are the appereance of "flares", like big round bolls when you take photos of sun, and other strong lights (street lights, and similar) Additionally you get a small reflection - often in greenish colors on the opposite of the optical axis with the objects opposite color, which is due to the reflection from the glas cover on a mobile phone lens. Almost all mobile phones do that, especially when the sun in the photo and the rest of the image is much darker, a light dot appears (or even several ones)
 
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Pashalis

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
The camera makes a HDR photo

which means in super rapid succession takes several photos, and then combines those into one photo. The aim of this is - to iron out too large contrasts between light and dark, so that within highlights (very light areas) details can still be show details (which normally with a single shot, would blow out (become white, without details)

However, if you - like in a car while driving - take photos - you get that "double" very effect, because for each shot, the car has moved (or the user) - and thereby isn't aligning properly anymore.


Mobile phones and their software voodoo

are prone to give other strange effects, everything from colors or shades that were not present to the naked eye (or not seen as strong), and other artifacts. (Hard compressed jpeg's also introduce color artifacts by the way)

I have noticed on my iPhone XS Max, that when I take images of prominent thunderstorm clouds against a blue sky, where head (top) part is strongly illuminated by the sun - and the rest of the cloud is in the shadows - the iPhone makes the sky look unnatural uneven. (instead of just showing a blue sky without any kind of unevenness). It actually makes the blue sky around the white cloud itself, darker than the rest - which looks strange (once your eye has noticed that effect from the mobile phone software voodoo)

So, for me the iPhone is pretty useless for authentic cloud photography (in my opinion) - and I don't use it on Thunderstorm clouds, with high contrast against a very even illuminated skies.


Here is an illustration

taken with an iPhone 7 Plus over Milazzo, Northern Sicily on 25 May 2018 on a cloud against what was a totally evenly lit blue sky. The software however creates a dark surrounding to the cloud boll... which was not there. In order to make your eye more sensitive to the effect - I have surrounded the image with a grey area.

View attachment 44717


Another very common effect: Flares

are the appereance of "flares", like big round bolls when you take photos of sun, and other strong lights (street lights, and similar) Additionally you get a small reflection - often in greenish colors on the opposite of the optical axis with the objects opposite color, which is due to the reflection from the glas cover on a mobile phone lens. Almost all mobile phones do that, especially when the sun in the photo and the rest of the image is much darker, a light dot appears (or even several ones)

Yes, those are basically some of the things that happened in those photos jess captured. Smartphone cameras are also notorious for distorting and rearranging pictures via algorithms and even artificial intelligence.
 

mabar

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I saw an interesting photograph (and close-up) on a FB group about the Electric Universe Theory, and there was some speculation about what type of phenomena it was. Taken August 9th in Ashville in St. Clair County. 🤔

View attachment 38354
Looks similar but moving.

Looks like someone "walks on the clouds" of #Syria. (March).

Another .. Julio 2018 , Alabama, #US.

another Similar event, Salta, #Argentina. (May, 2018).
 

thorbiorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
The other day, we saw a sun halo. A German page explains their frequency:
An attentive and knowledgeable halo observer can observe halos on average for over 100 days a year in Central Europe. Due to time constraints, however, the average observer will usually not achieve more than 60 - 80 days. A layperson who regularly observes the weather and clouds will perhaps perceive bright halos on 10-20 days. The consequence of this fact is obvious. There are a few things to consider in order to successfully observe halos.
As already mentioned at the beginning, halos occur on ice crystals, which mainly occur in the cirrus clouds. If the blue sky is covered with these veil clouds, halos are most likely to occur. In winter, at low temperatures, these conditions can also occur near the ground, so that cirrus is not necessarily required. One then speaks of the so-called 'ice fog'. Each of the over 50 known, different types of halo has its ancestral place in the sky. The most common types of halos include the 22 ° ring (approx. 40%), the sub-suns (approx. 30%), components of the circumscribed halo, such as the upper and lower contact arcs for the 22 ° ring (approx. 12%), Columns of light (approx. 8%) and circumzenital arches (approx. 5%). These five types of halos make up 95% of all halos.
The page has a list of many of the types of halo one may encounter. For each, it describes the ice crystals that may give rise to the phenomenon. Below there are two images with a short summary.

The first we discovered was a 22 degrees halo, see details in German and the Wiki. It was visible in a white transparent layer of high clouds of the cirrus variety (Cs).
From Useful concepts | International Cloud Atlas there is this image:
useful_concepts.jpg
The German page has a picture of the geometrical shape of the ice crystals that gives rise to the 22 degrees halo:

Screenshot 2021-05-30 110604.png

Interestingly the above halo is more common in Central Europe than an "ordinary" rainbow, however, since it is injurious to the eyes to look at the sun we are not in the habit of looking closely in that direction. In order to protect the eyes, the World Meteorological Organization actually recommends polarized sunglasses:

We also saw a section of a ring further out corresponding to a 46 degrees halo, see details in German, and the Wiki. The German site has an image:
Screenshot 2021-05-30 111222.png

The above gives an idea that it is the refraction of the light in the geometry of ice crystals that separates the white light from the sun into different colours.

The Wiki for the 22 degrees halo reveals that although this halo is so common, the formation is still being discussed:
Even though it is one of the most common types of halo, the exact shape and orientation of the ice crystals responsible for the 22° halo are the topic of debate. Hexagonal, randomly oriented columns are usually put forward as the most likely candidate, but this explanation presents problems, such as the fact that the aerodynamic properties of such crystals leads them to be oriented horizontally rather than randomly. Alternative explanations include the involvement of clusters of bullet-shaped ice columns.[4][5]
One can of course speculate on water being special, as is geometry and light, though it is hard to say how much more there is to this phenomenon than meets the eye. In the meantime, if we wish, we can look out and upward for the beauty of the clouds.
 
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