New Show: MindMatters (RIP Truth Perspective)

Possibility of Being

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A good one! It was a pleasure to listen to a sane voice and a brave person.

Long ago, in his "Twilight of the Idols" Nietzsche wrote:

“The liberal institutions cease to be liberal as soon as they are attained: later on, there are no worse and no more thorough injurers of freedom than liberal institutions. One knows, indeed, what their ways bring: they undermine the will to power; they level mountain and valley, and call that morality; they make men small, cowardly, and hedonistic - every time it is the herd animal that triumphs with them. Liberalism: in other words, herd-animalization.”

As for the whole 'equality' absurd, it also brings to mind a short story titled "Harrison Bergeron" written by Kurt Vonnegut (how did he know?!):

Also published in 1961 was Vonnegut's short story, "Harrison Bergeron", set in a dystopic future where all are equal, even if that means disfiguring beautiful people and forcing the strong or intelligent to wear devices that negate their advantages. Fourteen-year-old Harrison is a genius and athlete forced to wear record-level "handicaps" and imprisoned for attempting to overthrow the government.

We are heading there, one way or another unless the tide changes. It's about 15 minutes long reading. There are several audiobook videos on YT, Jordan Peterson's reading included. Well worth the time! Here is one:


There is also a pretty good movie "Harrison Bergeron", 1995, based on the short story (expanding and changing it a bit), directed by Bruce Pittman, and a short (literal) adaptation called "2081" by Chandler Tuttle. Watched both on YT and liked both.
 
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Redrock12

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Kudos Harrison, Adam, and Elan. Today's MindMatters with sister Juliana (aka Chu), The Wonders and Mysteries of Language, was a literal delight, to say the least. I have been following her thread Language, Sounds and Intelligent Design, and it is an incredibly fascinating topic. Your conversation with sister Chu brought out why, in fact, it is so fascinating. I would encourage everyone not to miss this podcast. And as for her thread please, start at the top of the thread, and read through all of the replies. Sister Chu's knowledge and comprehension is indeed, a rewarding and enriching learning experience.
 

Andrian

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Thank you Harrison, Elan, Adam and Chu for a great MindMatters episode. Will certainly watch it again since to be honest I didn't catch all the interesting stuff that Chu talked about during the show.

During the show Chu talked about the issue the foreigners are facing in learning to speak the local language without the accent of their native language and how sometimes when one is tired finds difficult to concentrate and speak in the local language. I've experienced it myself.

I've moved to Italy some time ago, for about 4-5 years while living here I really struggled to learn to speak a coherent and understandable Italian, oftentimes I'd use the wrong conjugation of verbs, when tired I'd slip a few words in my native language. :lol:

I remember that at the time I was learning the italian I was able to speak and read more easily and smoothly in English, a fact I've amusingand frustratingat the same time. What helped me a lot in learning to speak the italian and the english language as well was reading and writing on a daily basis. Still it was a wonderful experience learning the italian, well worth the efforts and hardships.

I guess that it depends on one's brain wiring so to speak regarding the ability to learn and speak a new language.

Thank you once again for a great show.
 

Ennio

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This recent discussion with Chu on language was just great. I was a little surprised to note how long the show clocked in for (over 1 hour an 40 minutes) because it went by Sooo quickly - which goes to show how immersed in the subject matter we all became. Enjoy!

MindMatters: Meaning All the Way Down: The Wonders and Mysteries of Language with Juliana Barembuem


Language. We use it to speak, obtain information and enrich our minds. We're immersed in it every day and would find it nearly impossible to communicate and exist in the ways that we're used to without it. And yet the use of language - and all its varied and nuanced components - are very largely taken for granted by us until we take a step or two back to think about how language works, how incredibly complex it is, what many languages have in common, what makes language successful (or not), and what some research into the origins of language suggest about how little we truly know about them.

This week on MindMatters we are joined by Juliana Barembuem of Language with Chu, a polyglot and long-time student of language, who presents a number of 'outside of the box' perspectives on language; what do languages have in common with discoveries in biology? Is language a feature of intelligent design? How is the use of language abused and in service of ideas that actually confuse and misinform - to name just a few. One thing to realize is that the deeper we get into this discussion the more we see that these lines of inquiry are really just the beginning of this conversation.

 

Voyageur

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That was a wonderful show, such an engaging subject that is somewhat taken for granted, which the show greatly expanded upon into many areas of thought.
I was a little surprised to note how long the show clocked in for (over 1 hour an 40 minutes) because it went by Sooo quickly - which goes to show how immersed in the subject matter we all became. Enjoy!
Indeed that was so.

No pressure, however Chu, if you were so inclined to ever decide to write a book on language, I would sign up early for a copy.

More local to me, is the language of the native American Kutenai (said to be a language isolate - foreign to other tribes), perhaps rather like the Basque in that it roots don't seem to spread, yet as was said of the Basque in the show, there seem to be some crossover.

Like other languages in the area, Kutenai has a rich inventory of consonants and a small inventory of vowels, though there are allophones of the three basic phonemic vowels. The lack of a phonemic distinction between voiced and voiceless consonants is much as in other languages of the area.[7] Because Kutenai is on the periphery of this linguistic area, the loss of a rich lateral inventory is consistent with other nearby languages, which now have only one or two lateral consonants. One such language group contains the Sahaptian languages, which have had a similar loss of laterals. Nez Perce has /ts/, believed to be the lateral affricate in the proto-language. Nez Perce, like Kutenai, lies in the eastern periphery of the Northwest Linguistic area.[7]
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Chu

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It was fun to be there, and the guys were good to me and didn't ask super hard questions.:flowers:

More local to me, is the language of the native American Kutenai (said to be a language isolate - foreign to other tribes), perhaps rather like the Basque in that it roots don't seem to spread, yet as was said of the Basque in the show, there seem to be some crossover.

Very interesting, thank you! I will look more into it. That's one of the things that always look very puzzling to me: how some Amerindian languages have common traits with Basque, for example. And how these "isolates" in general are not that different in the end.

As for writing, I'm working on it, but I need to gather a lot more knowledge first, and publish small articles to practice. I was never much of a writer, so it's doesn't come as easily as languages to me.:-[
 

SlipNet

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I really enjoyed this show, very interesting indeed! I'm not a polyglot but I do have a talent for mimicry, I can do loads of accents, always had fun in imitation. Goes back to my school days playing the clown, lol. The part where you discussed authenticity was of personal interest. I actually have two main accents in my mind, one Welsh, one English. The pronunciations vary, particularly with vowel sounds. It used to bug me, but it was with relief when I reached a point when I stopped worrying about it. The brain is the interface, and what you input will yield results.

I've subbed to your channel Chu, and will dig into the vids you've posted, thanks for sharing your work in this field.:-)
 

hiker

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Very fascinating podcast!

While listening, I remembered a thing about accents and singing.

For example, when songs are sung in English, often the person who sings "loses their accent". Whether they have a Scottish, Irish, US, etc. background, the output is pretty much "accentless". When you then hear the singer speak normally, the accent flourishes.
 
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