Methylene Blue, Mitochondrial Bioenergetics, and Disease Metabolism

Ant22

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fabric said:
(...) I'm sorry to hear about the setback Ant22! Yea, MB is definitely something you should not be guessing at when it comes to dosing. One thing you should have noticed if you were taking too much was if the colour of your urine was blue. A small amount will slightly discolour it (so like a greenish yellow) to a deeper blue for larger amounts. In my case at around 10mg I would have green pee but when I take around 50mg (which is just under 1mg/kg for me) it is very blue. There is a pretty narrow range in which benefits were noticed and outside of that either no effect or undesirable effects. Not sure if you had a look through some of the experiences reported here: _http://www.longecity.org/forum/topic/51983-methylene-blue-experiences/ but most were dosing in the microgram range (which was a lot less from the studies) and had varying reports on whether it worked for them or not. I'm still not sure exactly what the right dose would be and this has to be adjusted since everyone responds differently (similar to iodine). If you are going try a lower dose, make sure you get a scale (one that can read 0.001g) and dropper bottle and make it as per the example earlier.

Thank you for all the information you provided fabric! From what you’re saying my dosage couldn’t have been very high since my urine wasn’t really blue. It was a little green but the colour was very faint green. Maybe there’s something going on inside my body that caused the reaction I experienced but I will still say that the benefits were definitely worth it. Simply because I now know what feeling ‘very well’ should actually feel like.

Although I haven't looked at longecity.org I did spend some time on different forums to work out what to expect and I thought I was being careful with my approach and dosage. Turns out I still wasn't careful enough :)

Although the negative effects of MB lasted for about two weeks and I was still a little ’off' yesterday, today I’m feeling much better so it looks like the damage wasn't permanent. Gosh, that was a useful lesson of caution for me to learn!

Also, I noticed that since the negative symptoms of taking MB started I’ve been struggling to wake up in the morning more and I’ve been quite tired until mid afternoon. But I've been feeling quite well later in the day.

fabric said:
Methylene Blue Dosing Protocol

For convenience, I prepared a solution of methylene blue so that ten drops of solution would contain 13 mg of methylene blue. Since 10 drop is roughly equivalent to 0.5 mL, and the total volume of my empty dropper bottle is 30 mL, we obtain the following:

Desired dose: 13 mg
Volume of ten drops: 0.5mL
Dropper bottle volume: 30 mL
(13 mc / 0.5mL) = 26 mg/ml (desired final concentration of MB)
(26 mg/ml) * 30 mL = 780 mg = 0.78 g of methylene blue

Hence, I will need to dissolve 780 mg of methylene blue in a volume of 30 mL distilled water (the volume of my dropper bottle) to attain a final concentration of 26 mg/mL, so that ten drops of solution will contain about 13 mg +/- 5 mg.

So another example: You have a 50mL bottle to make the solution with and are aiming for 1 drop to give about 0.06mg of MB. So for 10 drops that would be 0.6mg.

Volume of ten drops: 0.5ml
Dropper bottle: 50ml
(0.6mg/0.5ml) = 1.2mg/ml
1.2mg/ml * 50ml = 60mg of methylene blue

So weigh out 60mg powder, put that in the bottle then fill it with distilled water. Give a good shake and one drop from the dropper should give you 60ug, similar

I think I’ll leave MB out for another month and re-start it on a super diluted dosage using the method you described in your post. I’ll start with one drop just to be on the safe side though.

fabric said:
One thing I noticed was that at first, when I would take 50mg, my urine would be dark blue in the evenings (I take my MB in the mornings) but the next day it would be back to normal. However after several days, I would still pee blue even in the morning. So I would skip that day but my urine would continue to be blue for another day. I'm thinking there was some kind of accumulation going on or my body is processing it differently so I backed down the dose and started taking it every other day instead. I haven't noticed much in the way of extra high energy levels or alertness but on days I do take it it seems that I have better recall and do better when studying my flashcards. Other than that, nothing really noticeable. However, I had the same when I took iodine. At first I was feeling very alert and energized but after awhile nothing. Or just a headache if I took too much.

I noticed a similar accumulation effect too but like I said, my urine was actually faint greenish rather than blue. I definitely did notice better memory and recall too. It looks like our experiences with MB differ a bit but I wonder whether it has anything to do with our 'starting points'? Maybe your overall energy levels are higher than mine and therefore you don't notice much improvement while mine are lower and I therefore saw such a big difference? Just speculating.

As for comparison to iodine, my experience has been a bit different as I've been able to tolerate quite high doses of iodine from the very beginning. I’m still on 6 drops of 12% Lugol, which is not exactly a low dose, but this is the amount that makes me feel best with no side effects. And if I forget to take it in the morning for more than two days I do start to feel a bit worse.

All in all, no matter how low my dose was it was still too much for me personally and I bolded section from your post above confirms this. You said you experienced a headache if you took too much. Well, like I said in my previous post, I had a very faint headache most of the time I was taking it. But I used to get very bad headaches so I figured this wasn't really that bad and put it down to my body adjusting to it like it did with iodine. Gosh, silly me :rolleyes:
 

Keyhole

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Ant22,

Another surprising effect was something that I didn't see discussed here - my period. Ever since I started taking iodine in December 2015 it has been ridiculously irregular and painful. I usually also get massive stomach aches that last for about a week after my period is over. (This problem started before my iodine adventure so it's not related to taking it though.) I sometimes have to resort to prescription strength painkillers in order to be able to function at work.

I started taking methylene blue a week before my period and to my surprise it was MUCH better! I wouldn't say it was perfect but the stomach ache was minimal and simple ibuprofen itself did the job.

Your symptoms sound like a text-book example of estrogen overload, and that can probably account for the fact that MB helped temporarily. MB is a potent aromatase inhibitor (blocks estrogen synthesis), but is also a monoamine oxidase inhibitor. This means that is preserves the action of a couple of substances, one being serotonin.

So despite consuming the MB (which is anti-estrogen), there is a fair chance that there are still high levels of circulation estrogens, and it is important to note that estrogen increases the production of serotonin. In this scenario, it is theoretically possible that the MAO inhibition acts to preserve the serotonin, which usually works in conjunction with estrogen to mediate some pretty horrid effects. ------ but take this fwiw as it is just speculation.

Overall, you probably did the right thing in stopping the MB supplementation, and sorry to hear about your experience!

Just to add, how much organ meat do you eat and how often? Vitamin A is so important for women, especially those with PMS.

You need a bucket load of vitamin A (also T3) to convert LDL to pregnenelone & pregnenelone to progesterone via the enzymes cyt P450scc and 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, respectively.

If a lot of your resources (LDL and pregnenolone) are being shunted off into cortisol production due to high stress or poor thyroid function, then there is a chance that insufficient vitamin A is left to make the conversion, subsequently resulting in low progesterone/androgens and high cortisol/estrogens.

If that doesn't make sense, then basically: high stress and low thyroid function mean you will have less of the restorative hormones, and more of the damaging hormones.
 

Ant22

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Thank you for your reply Keyhole, I was a little worried I provided too much information in my post and that it wasn't related to the topic but now I'm glad I did. Despite my symptoms being quite bad I'm actually almost glad I experienced them because they've led to more questions and answers. :)

I actually suspected high estrogen for a couple of years now because the symptoms do match. Well, most of them, apart from one: when I approached my doctor about it (on a number of occasions) I was told that I cannot be estrogen dominant because I haven't been putting on weight. Once I was even bluntly told I was way too skinny for them to even consider prescribing estrogen tests. I do wonder whether the reason why I didn't experience this particular symptom is related to the fact that my toothpick body shape runs in my family. Maybe something about my genetics has prevented me from gaining weight?

Also, if I remember it correctly, in the iodine thread you wrote that the standard thyroid testing criteria may not pick up low thyroid accurately. Is it possible that standard estrogen dominance criteria may also not always be accurate?

Another useful thing in your post was your question about organ meats: it made me realise I usually feel very well when I go back home where my mom cooks lots of poultry liver for me. My diet is so weird to her that she'll just stick to cooking whatever she knows I can eat - and that happens to be poultry liver fried in lard and pork jelly. I don't eat it when I'm not at my mom's place because I am an absolutely useless cook and it's near impossible to buy prepared liver that isn't friend in sunflower/rapeseed oil. But after two weeks of that liver spree I start getting tummy aches. I suspect that's the Hemochromatosis rearing its head with iron overload. I feel like I'm in a catch-22 situation here: I can't just eat lots of organ meats and then donate blood because I don't meet the minimum weight criteria. :-[ And they won't prescribe phlebotomies because my iron levels usually are right at the top of the acceptable range. Despite the fact that I start feeling bad while still within that range.

My health feels like some kind of confusing Tetris where all I get is the wrong logs :(

Yet despite my doctor telling me estrogen dominance was not very likely in my case, I decided to try a substance called DIM (Diindolylmethane). Apparently it helps remove excess estrogen and it actually did the job pretty well when it comes to bad periods. I only stopped taking it because I couldn't find one that didn't have soya in it and apparently cruciferous vegetables that DIM is derived from block absorption of iodine. But I guess maybe I should consider taking it again.

I'll go and buy vitamin A during my lunch later on today and get my mom to send me a recipe for fried liver :)

Also, you mentioned pregnenelone. I used to use this cream. Do you think it would be a good idea to use it again?

Sorry to flood you with a run down of all my health issues but do you think organ meats and vitamin A would enable me to take Methylene Blue later on when the problem is corrected? I was really impressed with the positive results I experienced during the initial week and I would really love to be able to experience them without the subsequent decline.
 

Keyhole

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Ant22 said:
Thank you for your reply Keyhole, I was a little worried I provided too much information in my post and that it wasn't related to the topic but now I'm glad I did. Despite my symptoms being quite bad I'm actually almost glad I experienced them because they've led to more questions and answers. :)

I actually suspected high estrogen for a couple of years now because the symptoms do match. Well, most of them, apart from one: when I approached my doctor about it (on a number of occasions) I was told that I cannot be estrogen dominant because I haven't been putting on weight. Once I was even bluntly told I was way too skinny for them to even consider prescribing estrogen tests. I do wonder whether the reason why I didn't experience this particular symptom is related to the fact that my toothpick body shape runs in my family. Maybe something about my genetics has prevented me from gaining weight?
Weight gain/obesity is only one manifestation of estrogen dominance, and is not the rule. Like many physiological imbalances, it can manifest as one group of symptoms (obesity), or the complete opposite symptoms (under weight), OR may not even affect the weight whatsoever. This is what makes it confusing for many, and a minefield for the person attempting to make sense of their condition.

It could be genetics, and it is a way in which your body has adapted to the stress. Everyone adapts differently, so its impossible list off all the possible symptoms of estrogenicity.

The main issue here is that estrogen is still assumed to be a benign female hormone ( which occasionally may lead to complications like breast cancer :lol:). Whereas there is a wealth of research that spans back many years supporting the notion that estrogen is more like a stress hormone, but one which also participates in the female reproductive cycle (in very small amounts). The primary effect of estrogen being rapid growth of tissue and the suppression of cell differentiation. So, in terms of growing the tissue within the vagina (which is shed via menstruation), or when you fall over and cut yourself and need a wound to heal.. this is a good thing. But due to the chronic estrogenicity we are exposed to via food and the environment, it becomes a big problem. Similarly, serotonin has also gained chief status as the so-called "happy hormone", when nothing could be further than the truth IMO.
Also, if I remember it correctly, in the iodine thread you wrote that the standard thyroid testing criteria may not pick up low thyroid accurately. Is it possible that standard estrogen dominance criteria may also not always be accurate?
I believe that probably the large majority of cases are completely missed. The test is designed to measure thyroid hormone levels in the blood. Thyroid is only operational when in the cell, and so far there is no way of measuring this. The best most accurate tests the thyroid specialists have devised is actually the cheapest and easiest to do: measure the anxillary temperature with a thermometer as soon as you have woken up and are still in bed. Broda Barnes said that in all of his 40+ years in practice, this was the most effective and reliable way of testing the thyroid function.

Ona similar note, estrogen acts in the cell, and blood levels have supposedly been found to be a poor indication of tissue levels. Apparently, prolactin is a better measure for estrogen. When estrogen rises, it activates prolactin secretion... and blood prolactin levels have been shown to be similar to tissue estrogen levels. So may be worth checking that out if possible.
Another useful thing in your post was your question about organ meats: it made me realise I usually feel very well when I go back home where my mom cooks lots of poultry liver for me. My diet is so weird to her that she'll just stick to cooking whatever she knows I can eat - and that happens to be poultry liver fried in lard and pork jelly. I don't eat it when I'm not at my mom's place because I am an absolutely useless cook and it's near impossible to buy prepared liver that isn't friend in sunflower/rapeseed oil. But after two weeks of that liver spree I start getting tummy aches. I suspect that's the Hemochromatosis rearing its head with iron overload. I feel like I'm in a catch-22 situation here: I can't just eat lots of organ meats and then donate blood because I don't meet the minimum weight criteria. :-[ And they won't prescribe phlebotomies because my iron levels usually are right at the top of the acceptable range. Despite the fact that I start feeling bad while still within that range.

My health feels like some kind of confusing Tetris where all I get is the wrong logs :(
Hmmm, with hemachromatosis thats a difficult one. I think you were right in avoiding organ meats in this case then, and may be a good idea to stay away from them for the time being. Ideally, some initial goals could be to increase your body weight first of all so you are able to donate the blood, and also to increase the flow during menses. In the mean time, some vitamin A supplementation is probably a wise idea. "Biocare" a fairly good one, retinyl palmitate, in liquid form dissolved in olive oil.

Yet despite my doctor telling me estrogen dominance was not very likely in my case, I decided to try a substance called DIM (Diindolylmethane). Apparently it helps remove excess estrogen and it actually did the job pretty well when it comes to bad periods. I only stopped taking it because I couldn't find one that didn't have soya in it and apparently cruciferous vegetables that DIM is derived from block absorption of iodine. But I guess maybe I should consider taking it again.
Yeah if you can get it in food form I would tend to think this is better. Despite the minor goitrogenic effect of the cruciferous veg, those things also provide a potent punch of calcium, magnesium, and other phytonutrients... sulforphane, indole-3-carbinol, isothiocyanates etc etc. Also, you have been taking a significant dose of iodine for a fairly long time, so I cant imagine that a slight inhibition of absorption would be an issue.
Also, you mentioned pregnenelone. I used to use this cream. Do you think it would be a good idea to use it again?
Fwiw I cant really say since it is difficult to know without maybe some test results and symptoms and stuff. Experimenting with supplements is one thing, but with hormones its a whole other kettle of fish ;D. I wouldnt feel right recommending that willy nilly. However, I think it is a fairly safe substance, and if one was inclined to start taking it, then it may have some beneficial effects. I personally take it dissolved in DMSO from a company calledIdealabsDC, but again... it is part of a personal experiment!

Sorry to flood you with a run down of all my health issues but do you think organ meats and vitamin A would enable me to take Methylene Blue later on when the problem is corrected? I was really impressed with the positive results I experienced during the initial week and I would really love to be able to experience them without the subsequent decline.
I guess you could, but honestly, if you can get all of those other things working properly, then you probably wouldnt even need to take it. That is the ultimate aim, right?
 

Laura

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I tried the MB at the "goodly dose" for a few weeks. Can't say that I noticed anything particularly beneficial. But then, "been down so long, it looks like up to me"; I may not be a good example!

However, there is one very, VERY odd thing. Among the many tests I did at the Belgrade clinic was metals and minerals thing. You won't believe it but my iodine was critically LOW! AND, my zinc was critically high! And, despite the fact that I've done numerous rounds of DMSA and EDTA, my mercury was also high.

I don't have an explanation for this considering how long and how much I loaded iodine and continue to take it off and on. However, I did wonder if the MB had anything to do with these results?
 

Keyhole

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Laura said:
However, there is one very, VERY odd thing. Among the many tests I did at the Belgrade clinic was metals and minerals thing. You won't believe it but my iodine was critically LOW! AND, my zinc was critically high! And, despite the fact that I've done numerous rounds of DMSA and EDTA, my mercury was also high.

I don't have an explanation for this considering how long and how much I loaded iodine and continue to take it off and on. However, I did wonder if the MB had anything to do with these results?
Hmm, the high serum zinc is strange and massively uncommon. Just to clarify, was this test via the urine? Or was it serum?

My thoughts on some possible reasons for the elevated zinc:

Zinc is bound with protein in the majority of cases, like Zn-Metallothioneins. Certain tissues contain high concentrations of zinc-bound-protein, and the catabolism of these tissues results in the protein being broken down to release large quantities of zinc into the blood. I just read a study that suggested a common cause of high serum zinc being a carcinoma, mainly of the liver, and the cancer-metabolism causing all of this bound zinc to be released. I would imagine that even if there is no carcinoma present, a state of chronic organ/tissue catabolism may be able to induce a similar thing.

One paper I also just read makes the link between zinc, AD, and oxidative stress:
Many of the pathological changes associated with aging and aging-related disorders have been attributed in part to increased and unregulated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brain. ROS are produced as a physiological byproduct of various cellular processes, and are normally detoxified by enzymes and antioxidants to help maintain neuronal homeostasis. However, cellular injury can cause excessive ROS production, triggering a state of oxidative stress that can lead to neuronal cell death. ROS and intracellular zinc are intimately related, as ROS production can lead to oxidation of proteins that normally bind the metal, thereby causing the liberation of zinc in cytoplasmic compartments. Similarly, not only can zinc impair mitochondrial function, leading to excess ROS production, but it can also activate a variety of extra-mitochondrial ROS-generating signaling cascades. As such, numerous accounts of oxidative neuronal injury by ROS-producing sources appear to also require zinc. We suggest that zinc deregulation is a common, perhaps ubiquitous component of injurious oxidative processes in neurons.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4028997/

The paper focuses on zinc levels in the brain, and it also is referring to intracellular zinc. However, it is possible that the process of oxidation elsewhere in the periphery also liberates zinc ions and causes the high levels you saw on your test. In this case, it may be simply a symptom of a chronically stressed out system and loads of ROS.

The low iodine is also interesting, especially since you were taking so much of it. My guess is that you either excrete it too quickly, or your absorption is screwed through something like estrogen, which is said to be one of the main factors in inhibiting iodine absorption anyway. As we know, its pretty ubiquitous... and even more so in a system which is under stress.

Im sorry to hear you still have all that mercury aswell. Sometimes people benefit from doing those chelation protocols, but others don't and it can make stuff worse. It is a redox-dependent process which basically relies on there being sufficient metabolic energy available to perform the task. So it seems like, unless cellular energy production is optimal (or a way towards that), doing a chelation protocol can be unsuccessful, because the body is still unable to rid itself of the nasties. So there is a saying by Jack Kruse that goes like this: "Redox before you Detox", which means fix the mitochondria and everything follows from that :P

Ultimately, could also be from the MB and the quality/contamination depends on the source.
 

dj

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ROS and intracellular zinc are intimately related, as ROS production can lead to oxidation of proteins that normally bind the metal, thereby causing the liberation of zinc in cytoplasmic compartments. Similarly, not only can zinc impair mitochondrial function, leading to excess ROS production, but it can also activate a variety of extra-mitochondrial ROS-generating signaling cascades.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4028997/

So for example - if you were taking large dose liposomal vitamin C regularly then you might be causing enough ROS production to release stores of Zinc?

Laura are you still taking loads of vit C? ('cause I sure am). Could that be at least part of the reason for the high zinc?

And why the high mercury after all that metal detoxing? Is there a chance you have some metal in you from a prior surgery (or dental source like a crown or bridge that is metal under enamel)?

OR might there be a chance you got bad lab results - maybe even switched with another patients' labs? That happens a lot more often than you'd expect, at least in US hospitals.
 

Ant22

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I just wanted to add a bit of an update. Although I haven't tried Methylene Blue again after my previous unpleasant "adventure" with it, I did take Keyhole's advice on vitamin A and I'd like to say I've had very good results with it!

Keyhole said:
Your symptoms sound like a text-book example of estrogen overload, and that can probably account for the fact that MB helped temporarily. MB is a potent aromatase inhibitor (blocks estrogen synthesis), but is also a monoamine oxidase inhibitor. This means that is preserves the action of a couple of substances, one being serotonin.

(...)

Just to add, how much organ meat do you eat and how often? Vitamin A is so important for women, especially those with PMS.

You need a bucket load of vitamin A (also T3) to convert LDL to pregnenelone & pregnenelone to progesterone via the enzymes cyt P450scc and 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, respectively.

If a lot of your resources (LDL and pregnenolone) are being shunted off into cortisol production due to high stress or poor thyroid function, then there is a chance that insufficient vitamin A is left to make the conversion, subsequently resulting in low progesterone/androgens and high cortisol/estrogens.

If that doesn't make sense, then basically: high stress and low thyroid function mean you will have less of the restorative hormones, and more of the damaging hormones.

I think Keyhole was right on the money with that estrogen dominance and I am an evidence that it doesn't have to involve weight gain and it can happen to skinny people too. My periods DID improve loads and simple ibuprofen meant I could actually function normally. It's actually quite amazing how quick the improvement has been.

Although I haven't been taking a "bucketload" of vitamin A I have been on quite high doses. It says on the bottle that the daily intake is 1 drop while I've been taking 7-10 drops around twice daily. I'll lower the dose to once a day now and see if my current improved state lasts. I guess I don't want to allow another situation when my symptoms improve for a bit only to go downhill shortly afterwards, like it was with MB.

I've had cravings for fried poultry liver and I pretty much caved in to these too :)

I've also noticed a couple of other symptoms improving. In a post in the Iodine thread Keyhole asked me if I had cold hands and feet. I said I didn't but I was in fact very sensitive to cold. Well, that seems to have improved quite significantly over the last month. I noticed that I can't sleep in my super thick long sleeve pyjamas and under my 13 dog duvet + wooly blanket (even in the summer) anymore because I'm simply boiling! Even during colder nights in mid July my duvet and pyjamas were way too warm for me.

Another thing that got better is melasma. It used to be really bad but iodine and supplements I've been on for the past 3 years did help quite a lot and the the hyperpigmentation has been very faint. However, it would flare up in the sun and before my period which made me think it was probably related to some hormonal imbalance. Well, not anymore, although the improvement could be related to the fact that I applied vitamin A on my face too. It's still there but it just doesn't get worse at different points of the month.

All in all, I guess vitamin A has been yet another missing piece of the puzzle so thank you for the suggestion :flowers:

I guess the above isn't directly related to MB but in case someone else has a similar reaction to MB as me and their overall health symptoms are similar then vitamin A may be a solution.
 

RedFox

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I've been taking MB every day for about 3 months now. Starting with 0.5mg per day, working up to 5mg a day after the first month.

Like Ant22 reported, I've found it stabilized my energy. Physical stamina was increased and my overall levels of daily tiredness (physical and mental) reduced. So this has been a positive.
I did also initially get a flare of of rashes/skin conditions. After Keyholes suggestion that it may be the body detoxing heavy metals, I took a round of EDTA and the rashes have not come back since.

After experimenting with a few things I've settled on reducing the MB with malic acid (to make the solution more acidic), a tiny amount of vitamin C (the solution doesn't become clear without some), and exposing the solution to a strong light source (either sunlight or placing it next to a halogen/LED kitchen light).
The solution can be turned from blue to clear in a matter of seconds in this way.

One of the most interesting changes has been to my skin. Not only does it look healthier, but it now tans very quickly from only an hour or so of exposure (I use to stay pasty white or just burn).

I have also had to make sure I'm getting enough folic acid or trimethylglycine (re: MTHFR mutation), as my body seems to be using more of it. The first signs I am low on it is the skin on my inner lips/lips starts to become sensitive and looser (looses integrity/elasticity), followed by my feet, followed by my joints in general.
Eating broth, or taking joint supplements can also counteract this - but folate or trimethylglycine clear it up the quickest (both routes for methylation that are sluggish with the MTHRF mutation). These may be needed as part of detoxification, or perhaps healing? My need for more of these is slowly reducing.

One last observation is that my ability handle higher doses of iodine without it causing neurological problems has increased considerably.
 

Keyhole

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Hey RedFox, I think its good that you are recognising the increased need for folate/TMG.

What are the other mutations you have?

The reason I ask is that the methylation cycle is coupled with multiple other cycles (Urea, BH4 etc) which includes the action of monamine oxidase enzymes responsible for degrading dopamine, serotonin etc.

If you have an MAOA/B polymorphism, then taking methylene blue (which is a MAO inhibitor) is likely gonna affect the rest of the processes associated with methylation. Depending on the polymorphism, you could have slower or faster MAO activity. So by decreasing the activity of the MAO enzyme via methylene blue supplementation, it could be increasing your need for the TMG/folate.

I'm not too savvy on the details, so sorry for not being able to provide any specifics or anything. I do have an exam on nutrigenomics early next year, so will be studying it in depth over the next couple of weeks. Its certainly an interesting topic. Maybe check up your SNPs and then google MAO inhibitor effects on those specific SNPs, and hopefully you can find your answer!
 

RedFox

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I checked the main MAOA SNP (rs6323) and I have a T, so low MAO activity.
Double checked COMT V158M (rs4680) and I have A/G so slow-ish.

I hadn't looked at MAO before, but overall that would suggest I have slow recycling of (and high levels of? Although the MTHFR would mean I perhaps mean production is slow?) serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine.
MAO inhibitors then probably aren't going to be doing me much good.

I dropped the MB and smoking after reading the reply and looking into my MAO SNP's and (fortunately being on holiday) spent the next day or so unable to keep my eyes open.
Could all the energy have been just noradrenaline?
 

Kay Kim

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Today I was re-reading the Cassiopaean Session Transcripts and found out that Cs warning about Methylene Blue.
I am posting here, so, everybody should understand.

Q: (L) Well, then that kind of leads to my next question. There's this issue about using methylene blue as some kind of brain enhancer or body enhancer and so forth. So, I would like to know if methylene blue is in a general sense for many people, or the majority of people, or lots of people, a beneficial element to take?

A: No

Q: (L) Why?

A: The studies used to back this claim have to do with disease conditions. If you read carefully, you will note that the benefits accrue to those with pathology and not so much to normal controls. Further, MB raises blood pressure and can destroy beneficial biomes. So, extrapolating results to justify ingestion is irresponsible.

Q: (Joe) Were you taking methylene blue before you went to Serbia?

(L) Yeah. But I quit a couple of weeks before we went.

(Joe) When you were in Serbia, you had high blood pressure.

(Artemis) Well, I'm glad I only took it three times.

(Pierre) Each time I took it, I felt terrible. It increased the headaches.
 

Kireto

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Would Methylene blue be a safe treatment for those aged over 60s who may be diabetic/pre-diabetic?

I am asking on behalf of a family member. They had caught some kind of respiratory infection, a week ago. Now the coughing and wheezing has subsided, but the lack of energy and appetite remains.

Would the mitochondrial cocktail be more suitable, that @Gaby shared? Or can a combination of methylene blue, Vit C and NAC be used?
 
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