Mass extinction, evolutionary leap and the virus-information connection

PERLOU

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Merci PIERRE pour le résumé de ton livre, tu nous en avais parlé lors de notre dernière réunion Française, à l'époque j'avais attrapé le Covid Anglais (que j'ai soigné toutes seule avec du doliprane et 3 semaines au lit), j'étais souffrante et ce que tu nous as dit m'a fait tellement de bien qu'une énergie positive s'est emparée de mon corps et a perduré deux jours... C'était fascinant à vivre... J'en avais parlé lors des commentaire de notre dernière réunion Française...
Merci, j'ai hâte de lire ton livre mais je sais qu'il faut que je sois patiente car je ne lis et parle que le Français...

Thank you PIERRE for the summary of your book, you told us about it during our last French meeting, at the time I had caught the English Covid (which I treated myself with doliprane and 3 weeks in bed), I was suffering and what you told us did me so much good that a positive energy took hold of my body and lasted two days... It was fascinating to experience... I had mentioned it during the comments of our last French meeting...
Thank you, I can't wait to read your book but I know I have to be patient because I only read and speak French...

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
 

forest_light

Padawan Learner
It depends on your knowledge about the subject, but If I were you, I would read the first one for sure. In the first book there are many pearls of knowledge, above all, many basic concepts.

This is just my humble opinion, forest_light :-)
I value your opinion jhonny! Thank you for taking the time to offer it.

My knowledge on many levels is most certainly limited! So absolutely I will be reading everything I can get my paws on, including both of these phenomenal inspiring books. Just looking at the subject list of the second one gets me all tingly!

My question was not well worded, but related to me wondering if someone not familiar with this work (who picked it up in the library for example) would be able to comprehend clearly the material/ subject matter without reading the first book... but I guess if they didn’t fully comprehend it (but it resonated with them) it might pique their interest to explore this further.

I am assuming if I dontate books to the library that is not STS behaviour? I am not wanting to ‘lure’ anyone into anything, just leave some ‘gems’ for one who might appreciate their depth, complexity, magnificence and resonate with the essence of the original source of inspiration and knowledge. 🙂
 

herondancer

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I'm really looking forward to the new book. With the world's attention focused on viruses, it's a good time to rescue their reputation from being only evil. They can be beneficial when they are properly utilized! :wizard: :cool2:


Time to re-read Earth Changes!
 

Alejo

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
As I was doing my news round today I came across this article that reminded me of the thesis of your book Pierre.

Extinction at the end-Cretaceous and the origin of modern Neotropical rainforests
The origin of modern rainforests can be traced to the aftermath of the bolide impact at the end of the Cretaceous. Carvalho et al. used fossilized pollen and leaves to characterize the changes that took place in northern South American forests at this time (see the Perspective by Jacobs and Currano). They not only found changes in species composition but were also able to infer changes in forest structure. Extinctions were widespread, especially among gymnosperms. Angiosperm taxa came to dominate the forests over the 6 million years of recovery, when the flora began to resemble that of modern lowland neotropical forest. The leaf data also imply that the forest canopy evolved from relatively open to closed and layered, leading to increased vertical stratification and a greater diversity of plant growth forms

[...]

The end-Cretaceous event was catastrophic for terrestrial communities worldwide, yet its long-lasting effect on tropical forests remains largely unknown. We quantified plant extinction and ecological change in tropical forests resulting from the end-Cretaceous event using fossil pollen (>50,000 occurrences) and leaves (>6000 specimens) from localities in Colombia. Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) rainforests were characterized by an open canopy and diverse plant–insect interactions. Plant diversity declined by 45% at the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary and did not recover for ~6 million years. Paleocene forests resembled modern Neotropical rainforests, with a closed canopy and multistratal structure dominated by angiosperms. The end-Cretaceous event triggered a long interval of low plant diversity in the Neotropics and the evolutionary assembly of today’s most diverse terrestrial ecosystem.
 

Nicholas

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
The latest Thunderbolts Project video is a fascinating connection between the sun, Earth and comets and their effects on plagues. They seem to confirm Pierre's and Laura's observations as written in their books.
Archaeologist and Thunderbolts colleague Peter Mungo Jupp presents a radical idea that civilization destroying plagues may be governed by electromagnetism such as cosmic rays. Nature often uses triggers based on hard to pinpoint factors when losing its newest progeny. For example, we see a rise of inexplicable mice plagues, seasonal infections, aggressive behavior, locust swarms, volcanic activity, earthquakes, and tsunamis. If nature relies on electromagnetic signals, what happens when these signals become chaotic? Perhaps the devastating Bubonic plague of 1346–1353 (aka The Black Death) illustrates just such a black picture.
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I'm really excited about Pierre's new book. And make no mistake about it, he's doing some serious heavy lifting with querying the Cs and then doing the hard research to confirm or deny, or just simply formulate and explain things.

My own new book, "From Paul to Mark: Paleochristianity", is now ready to go. Just a few formatting tweaks and it goes to press... that is, any day now.
 

PERLOU

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
C'est un grand pas mais quand pourrons nous espérer la traduction en Français?
Je pense que comme pour le livre de Pierre il va falloir s'armer de patience ...
En tout cas un grand merci à vous pour tout votre travail et vos efforts pour partager la connaissance ...

C'est un grand pas mais quand peut-on attendre la traduction en français?
Je pense que quant au livre de Pierre, il faudra être patient ...
En tout cas un grand merci à vous pour tout votre travail et vos efforts pour partager les connaissances ...
 

ramaj

Jedi
FOTCM Member
I'm really excited about Pierre's new book. And make no mistake about it, he's doing some serious heavy lifting with querying the Cs and then doing the hard research to confirm or deny, or just simply formulate and explain things.

My own new book, "From Paul to Mark: Paleochristianity", is now ready to go. Just a few formatting tweaks and it goes to press... that is, any day now.
YES!!!
 

Alejo

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
I'm really excited about Pierre's new book. And make no mistake about it, he's doing some serious heavy lifting with querying the Cs and then doing the hard research to confirm or deny, or just simply formulate and explain things.

My own new book, "From Paul to Mark: Paleochristianity", is now ready to go. Just a few formatting tweaks and it goes to press... that is, any day now.
Sorry Mary Balogh, but I'm gonna need to put you down for a while... :)
 

Pierre

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
As I was doing my news round today I came across this article that reminded me of the thesis of your book Pierre.

[...]The end-Cretaceous event triggered a long interval of low plant diversity in the Neotropics and the evolutionary assembly of today’s most diverse terrestrial ecosystem.

Thanks for sharing this abstract. It's a good example of more complex, or at least more diverse ecosystems, "developing" after cometary-induced mass extinctions.
 

Pierre

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
C'est un grand pas mais quand pourrons nous espérer la traduction en Français?
Je pense que comme pour le livre de Pierre il va falloir s'armer de patience ...
En tout cas un grand merci à vous pour tout votre travail et vos efforts pour partager la connaissance ...
Making "Cometary Encounters" available in French will take some time. The content of the English version is almost finished except the bibliography and the index. Once the English version is done, the English to French translation can start and will probably take months.

Concerning "Mass extinction, evolutionary leap and the virus-information connection", the draft, written in English, is now about 180 pages and almost 50,000 words. I think it will take a few more months to complete it.
 

Alejo

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
As I was doing my news round up for the day I came across this article that reminded me of this book once again :)

Introduction​


Asteroid and comet impact events are known to be able to cause severe disruption to surface-dwelling organisms and ecosystems (Raup, 1992). One such example is the end-Cretaceous Chicxulub impact, which led to the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs and ∼75% of all species (Schulte et al., 2010; Morgan et al., 2016). Despite the growing understanding of the effects of impacts on life, we have little knowledge of how these events, particularly the geological changes caused by them, influence the abundance and distribution of microbial life in the deep subsurface over time as opposed to the microbial changes caused by drastic environmental changes resulting from impact (Bralower et al., 2020; Schaefer et al., 2020). As the deep microbial biosphere has an important role to play in global biogeochemical cycles, such as the carbon cycle (Amend and Teske, 2004; Colwell and Smith, 2013; Magnabosco et al., 2018), it is of considerable interest to investigate how it has been shaped by catastrophic geological events in the past.

In near-surface environments, asteroid impacts have been shown to increase the porosity and permeability of rocks, enhancing microbial colonization (Cockell et al., 2002, 2005; Pontefract et al., 2014; Osinski et al., 2020a). In contrast, sedimentary rocks which often already contain microbially accessible porosity (Friedmann, 1982), may have their porosity reduced by impact, resulting in a loss of colonization space (Cockell and Osinski, 2007). Although these observations inform us about how shock metamorphism and heating affect different rock types, we lack an understanding of how impacts shape the microbial biosphere at the regional scale and how deep subsurface fracturing of rocks, for example, influences the availability of redox couples and nutrients by changing fluid flow at lithological boundaries and within units.

The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) Expedition 364 drilled into the Chicxulub crater peak ring, which is a discontinuous topographic ring that is now buried by Cenozoic sediments (Figure 1). The expedition recovered a continuous core (site M0077) from 505.7 to 1,334.7 m below seafloor (mbsf) (Morgan et al., 2016, 2017) and encountered the top of the peak ring at ∼618 mbsf.

From an article in spanish that discussed the study, I found this:

"The heat and pressure from the impact created a sterilized area that caused a localized extinction of the microbes that lived there," Schaefer said. "But about a million years after the impact, the crater cooled to temperatures low enough for microbial life to return and evolve in isolation for the last 65 million years," he added.

If I understood correctly, there's microbial life that has been living there for 65 million years completely isolated from the rest of the planet, and this was possible due to the very impact which had originally destroyed life.
 
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