Lost California dog found in southern New Mexico

c.a.

The Living Force
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Published 9:18 AM EDT Oct 3, 2019 Video / 02:15
LAS CRUCES, N.M.—(32.3199° N, 106.7637° W) / 1 038,96 km (645,58 mi)
New Mexico - It is a common thing for a pet to wander off and end up in a different neighborhood, but a pup recently appeared in Las Cruces after an astounding 700-mile trip from home in California.

New Mexico State University student Juan Treto remembers walking home when an energetic young Husky suddenly appeared before him.

The dog was friendly and quickly found a home with Treto.

"I thought maybe she was on a vacation or something," said Treto. "I could tell that she just wanted to be loved."

Juan spent about six weeks fostering the dog, which he took to calling 'Annie'.

Juan eventually took Annie to a pet expo to get looked at further.

It was then that specialists discovered that the dog was chipped, allowing Juan to get in contact with the actual owner.

"I think she was more surprised that her dog was in New Mexico," he said. "She said that she had lost her in Orange County, (33°46'19.7"N 117°50'35.6"W), and had no idea that someone from New Mexico would end up calling her."

As it turns out the dogs given name is actually 'Bella' and has a family near Los Angeles that's been waiting to get her back.

"I have two daughters, and they have been heartbroken," said original owner Jessica Smith. "I didn't think we were ever going to hear about her again. I thought I hope she didn't get eaten. I was thinking the worst."

Although the parting is bittersweet for Juan, he is happy to have made a difference and recognized the role he played in helping to reunite the family.
 

Laura

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Maybe the dog didn't want to go home?

When I was growing up, we had a dog named "Mike" who seemed to be something like a black lab/something mix. He was a terrific dog.

Anyway, we had a farm out in the country about 50 miles from our home in Tampa that was our weekend/holiday home. One week or weekend, at the end of our stay, Mike had disappeared and could not be found; we spent several hours looking for him and calling. We had to get back to town because adults had business the following morning. Needless to say, my brother and I were crying and very unhappy about leaving without Mike.

About friday of that week, Mike was seen by us just trotting down the street toward home. He was SUPER hungry and thirsty, but he was home! He apparently traveled the whole 50 miles on his own, navigating a LOT of traffic once he got close to the city. And he knew exactly where to go.

Still amazes me.
 

Rabelais

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Maybe the dog didn't want to go home?

Knowing the natural homing instinct in dogs, from experience, that was my first thought also.

After WW II my father built our first home in what then was the outskirts of Tulsa. We had a little black and tan terrier named Mickey. As the city and its traffic grew toward us, we moved to a new house, in what was now the outskirts of town. The parents thought I would benefit from the recently built highly rated high school in our new residential district.

Mickey disappeared the first night in the new house. We searched the neighboring fields to no avail for two days. On the third day our former next door neighbor called us to inform that Mickey was sitting patiently on the front porch of our old house. Since he wouldn't leave she had brought him some water and food. The new house was several miles from the old neighborhood and Mickey had only made the trip once in the car when we moved. We were amazed that he had managed to beeline his stubby little legs straight back to the old residence. Cats seem to have this ability too.
 

Ursus Minor

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I cannot really imagine a pup wandering 700 miles through desert-like areas. 🌵

Excluding a "Missing 411" scenario I would rather think that someone must have picked her up on the way,
taking the doggy with him/her to New Mexico.

Compassion or animal theft, Bella got away and made it home...
 

Laura

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I cannot really imagine a pup wandering 700 miles through desert-like areas. 🌵

Excluding a "Missing 411" scenario I would rather think that someone must have picked her up on the way,
taking the doggy with him/her to New Mexico.

Compassion or animal theft, Bella got away and made it home...

Well, that's a thought too! How many missing pets are due to transdimensional interference?
 

WIN 52

The Living Force
Walked into a portal in California and walked out in New Mexico. The only other option is hitching a ride. But that way, the dog wouldn't be so disoriented.
 

Keit

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Knowing the natural homing instinct in dogs, from experience, that was my first thought also.
Well, that's a thought too! How many missing pets are due to transdimensional interference?

I think that in this particular case what should be taken into account that it is a husky pup. Huskies are nomads and don't have a homing instinct. And since they are born to run, they can cover large distances, particularly with training. There is no mention in the article for how long the pup was actually missing, but theoretically it could walk all this distance. Though not sure about the desert heat, since huskies obviously prefer a colder weather. So, who knows! Maybe the pup was "helped" in some way.
 

c.a.

The Living Force
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I tend feel it's just another blip:
 

c.a.

The Living Force
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11:50am Dec 4, 2020 Video / 3:57
A puppy has been reunited with his owner after being found in Sydney's CBD this week, 480km away from his home in regional NSW.

When owner Alex returned to her home in Yass in southern NSW on Tuesday morning, she realised Speck, her three-month-old cattle dog, was missing.

After calling neighbours and posting on Facebook, Alex feared Speck would be lost forever but a day later she received a phone call from police saying her dog had been found more than three hours away in Sydney.

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Three-month-old puppy found 480kms from home after going missing from home in Yass. The dog was reunited with his owner Alex today. December 4, 2020. (NSW Police Force)

"I was worried she'd been hit by a car and we weren't going to get her back and it has definitely been hot at home but she was safe that's for sure," she said.

The woman who found the lost puppy told police she was travelling through Yass earlier that morning when she found Speck alone on the side of the road before continuing to Sydney.

https%3A%2F%2Fprod.static9.net.au%2Ffs%2Fcccac603-69cb-4c63-bc98-ffb3384b14f3

Three-month-old puppy found 480kms from home after going missing from home in Yass. (NSW Police Force)

https%3A%2F%2Fprod.static9.net.au%2Ffs%2Fa88e8563-905b-4ff5-8b4d-bba8c3e52bbd

Speck has been reunited with his owner. (9News)

Speck was in good spirits when police found him and was examined by vets, with no injuries found.

After positing an alert on Facebook, police were contacted by a woman who had heard from a neighbour via social media that her dog, Speck, had been located and was waiting for her in Sydney.
 

c.a.

The Living Force
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Arkansas dog ‘Razzle’ missing for 10 years found in California; family overjoyed
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Posted: Jun 11, 2021 / 04:47 PM EDT / Updated: Jun 11, 2021 / 04:47 PM EDT (Video-02:45)

McRAE, Ark. (KARK) – A dog named Razzle disappeared from his Arkansas home more than ten years ago.

While his family kept him in their hearts, they had no idea what might have happened to their beloved pooch — until they received a phone call recently from 1,900 miles away in California. They’re now anxiously awaiting an emotional reunion a decade after the disappearance.

Missing dog found over 1,600 miles away in San Joaquin County 10 years after disappearing
Posted: May 28, 2021

The last time the Howard family saw Razzle was in 2011.


For a little perspective, one of their sons was 8 years old when Razzle disappeared; that once little boy just graduated high school.

How the dog got from Arkansas all the way to California is a mystery, but the family can’t wait to get him back home.

Razzle may have lost some dazzle, but he hasn’t lost the love of his owner, Aaron Howard.

“You don’t just have that pet disappear and it not leave a really big hole,” Howard said.

The last day he saw Razzle was routine.

“It was a Saturday morning and we let him out like we had done every morning for six years and that morning, he just didn’t come back,” Howard said
.

The Howards looked for months before hope ran out.

Ten years later, hope showed up at a trailer park in Stockton, California.

Animal control ran Razzle’s microchip and gave Howard the good news.

“What? Are you kidding? This can’t be real,” Howard recalled saying. “Just overjoyed that this could even be possible because he’s 16 years old.”

Razzle is being fostered by a woman in California until he’s healthy enough to fly home.

“We’re waiting to just hear. When can we get him? What’s the plan? Were just really anxious to get him back,” Howard said.

Miniature Schnauzers typically live 12-15 years. Howard knows Razzle is on borrowed time.

“We were like, we want him back for whatever time that he has and if nothing else, he will come home and when he does pass, he’ll be at home,” Howard said. “We never thought that we would see him again and have that hole filled back up again so we’re thankful.”

The people taking care of Razzle in California are offering to fly with the dog to Arkansas at no cost to the Howards.
 
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