Ketogenic Diet - Powerful Dietary Strategy for Certain Conditions

Andrey

Padawan Learner
Well, first thing to note is that saturated fats may in some increase some fraction of cholesterol, the thing is - who cares!

Cholesterol is not the bogeyman you may have been led to believe it is. There is for instance no correlation between patients admitted to ED with acute myocardial infarction (heart attack) and their level of cholesterol - if the hypothesis were true that cholesterol causes heart disease, the result would be skewed towards high cholesterol. Cholesterol is (mostly - with the exception of some genetic variants) a sign of inflammation, the attempt of the body to fix things.

The main issue with PUFA is oxydation - or in another term, they turn ‘rancid’. That is why a lot of those PUFA need to be chemically treated/ processed to be palatable, and to remain so over the (prolonged) shelf life of the product.

Most dieticians are still wed to the old Keysian ‘Lipid Heart Disease Theory’ - this theory has been shown to be incorrect at least 30 years ago, if not longer.

Well my dad has high cholesterol problems and high blood pressure, not to mention an excised gall bladder, and I've been looking to see if a keto diet and consuming saturated fats would be beneficial for him, but I'm sure his doctor would disagree. Would keto work for him or people like him?
 

Andrey

Padawan Learner
Also are there potential negative side effects from being in ketosis long term? Or do the pros outweigh the cons in this case? From what I've gathered so far, this forum promotes being on keto long term and indefinitely if possible... but people I've spoken to say that isn't a good idea.
 

hlat

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Also are there potential negative side effects from being in ketosis long term? Or do the pros outweigh the cons in this case? From what I've gathered so far, this forum promotes being on keto long term and indefinitely if possible... but people I've spoken to say that isn't a good idea.
I recommend that you take your time to read all 287 pages of this thread. You will learn a lot. Keto is not for everyone.
 

nicklebleu

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Keto is not for everyone

I totally agree with hlat - read the whole thread if you want to know more about this topic. It’s a long thread and you’ll see that the stance on keto diet has shifted somewhat over time.

As hlat mentioned, keto is not for everyone, and to be in keto all the time, even if you tolerate it well, is questionable. I used to be hard-core keto for about three years and have upped my carbs somewhat over time. I also do intermittent fasting, which may convey similar benefits.

So, yes, read the thread and you’ll know a whole lot more about the keto diet.

As to your dad - everyone can benefit from keto, problem is, you won’t know unless you try. And then, the benefits maybe are not due to the keto diet per se, but by the avoidance of stuff you would eat if not on a keto diet.

It’s complicated, and most importantly, it’s an individual thing. You might have to experiment - and experiment for a prolonged period of time - to know whether keto is for you, and to what degree.
 

Andrey

Padawan Learner
Working my way through the thread. Had a quick question (if answered later in the thread then my apologies)

Is the fat:protein ratio 3:1 or 4:1? I'm around 200 lbs, not exactly skinny.

Got another question. If I were to start doing daily resistance exercises, then how would my protein intake and my fat:protein ratio factor into this?
 

Korzik18

Jedi
FOTCM Member
Working my way through the thread. Had a quick question (if answered later in the thread then my apologies)

Is the fat:protein ratio 3:1 or 4:1? I'm around 200 lbs, not exactly skinny.

Got another question. If I were to start doing daily resistance exercises, then how would my protein intake and my fat:protein ratio factor into this?
I used this ratio of proteins: carbohydrates: fats is 10%: 10%: 80%. I would advise you to use the program Cronometer: Track nutrition & count calories /. I had enough free functionality. Since I love accuracy, it was important for me to control all the parameters, especially at the first stages of the keto diet. When registering, you will enter your data (weight, height, body fat content), choose a diet, the degree of your physical activity and the program will give recommendations in grams how many proteins, fats and carbohydrates, etc. you need to consume.
I would still recommend reading this thread and a good book on keto nutrition. For example, Dr. Mercola. It helped me to create an overall picture of what advantages await me and what difficulties. It is necessary to prepare for the transition to keto, buy the necessary products, vitamins, etc. The transition to keto for everyone happens in different ways, for someone it is easier, for someone it is more difficult. Knowledge is not superfluous.
Here I described my initial experience
I hope this will help you a little, but in any case, only from personal experience you will understand all the subtleties of the keto diet.
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I've always done 2:1. That's fat to (protein+carbs) in grams. So if you eat 22g of protein and 3g of carbs, you need to eat 50g of fat. I start with the target of protein and go from there. So eating excess carbs just makes you need to eat more fat. But I think there is room to have a meal that doesn't reach ketosis levels, especially when you're adapted. I think there are charts for how much protein you need to eat if you're active or doing weight lifting.
 

itellsya

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
At the end of the day, it’s probably and individual thing - just play with the ratios a bit and see what works best for you. IOn diet matters there is no one-size-fits-all.

Indeed. Andrey, in my experience, everybody is different. There are general rules, such as reducing carbs, eating real foods, but the rest the person needs to tailor by listening to their body. You'll find more information as to what these general rules are by reading the whole thread.

Many of us tried limiting our protein/adding extra fat according to ratios and found that it didn't work like that.

For me, how i work in a day (whether that be mentally or physically) determines how much i will need to eat to feel satiated. I like more fat, protein and a bit of salad, others do better with less fat, protein and rice/vegetables.

Bear in mind that, often, when switching to a diet like this, an adjustment period is needed. So how you eat now may not be how you'll eat in a few months time. It took me a month or more when trying out keto to be able to digest fat (enzymes helped a lot), and now i can consume it without issue.

There's a podcast from 2017 from the Objective:Health peeps that might help with your question:

The Health & Wellness Show: The Devil's in the Details: Diet Dogma and Fine-Tuning Your Own

 
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