Gluten-free Recipes

Mrs. Peel

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Trevrizent said:
I’m glad that you liked this bread. I now make a smaller version, with similar proportions. In terms of rising, the second recipe,
Ingredients
1 3/4Cup (255g) Buckwheat flour
1/4Cup (33g) Tapioca flour
1tsp salt
1tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 1/2tsp cream of tartar
1tbsp butter, or ghee
1 egg lightly beaten – or left out for the egg free version
¾ Cup rice plus 1tbsp (205ml) rice milk or goats milk – or for the egg free version, ¾ Cup plus 2tbsp plus 1tsp (225ml)

You can use less liquid to make a dough that can be ‘shaped’, can cut a deep cross on it and prick the centre of the quadrants ‘to let the fairies out’. However, the sloppier the mix the better it is for Gluten-free flours.

As this Soda bread uses a smaller amount of flour, a 6in (15cm) cake tin was greased and lined with baking paper and place inside greased and lined 9.5in (24cm) casserole. The combination was preheated in the oven at 230C/450F/Gas Mk 8.

The dry ingredients were mixed in a large plastic food bag, and thoroughly mix by tossing around the flours in the bag. The flour mix was emptied into a large mixing bowl.
The lightly beaten egg was then incorporated into the flour mix, followed by the milk.
The mixture was poured into the hot cake tin inside the casserole, the lid put on, and baked for 20mins or until a skewer comes out clean.
rising slightly more, but not by a lot. Ghee will improve the keeping time and add a little more flavour to the original recipe you used. I enjoy both versions of the bastible bread. :D I make both versions using the cake tin within the casserole.

Do you cook it at 450F? Wow, that's hot!! What's the purpose of using a double pan? Do you cook it the same amount of time in a regular pan without a lid? I don't have a casserole dish that a pan would fit in. Bicarbonate of soda is baking powder, right?

Thanks, I've never baked before..
 

Ollie

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Hi Mrs Peel
...
Do you cook it at 450F? Wow, that's hot!! What's the purpose of using a double pan? Do you cook it the same amount of time in a regular pan without a lid? I don't have a casserole dish that a pan would fit in. Bicarbonate of soda is baking powder, right?

Thanks, I've never baked before..

Yes, this particular bread is cooked at 450F. The purpose of the lidded pan is 'double cooking' - steamed with the lid on, whilst the bread is baked. You can pour the mixture straight into a casserole dish with a lid, make sure that the handle can take the temperature. You can up the quantities to get a thicker, higher, bread. This is what I did first of all. I use the tin within to get a smaller diameter, yet 'taller' bread. A quarter of the quanty shown in the recipe lasts me a day, I freeze the rest and bring out on a daily basis to eat.

For baking in a regular pan without a lid, I would bake at a lower temperature, hence the time would be longer. And, bicarbonate of soda is baking soda. The bastible type bread produces a 'softer' bread. I have yet to make an acceptable bread in a pan without a lid.

The recipe also works well just using all Buckwheat flour. :)

Have fun experimenting with your cooking, that's how I learn. Some stuff works, some others go straight into the bin! :)
 

Mrs. Peel

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Trevrizent said:
Hi Mrs Peel
For baking in a regular pan without a lid, I would bake at a lower temperature, hence the time would be longer. And, bicarbonate of soda is baking soda. The bastible type bread produces a 'softer' bread. I have yet to make an acceptable bread in a pan without a lid.

The recipe also works well just using all Buckwheat flour. :)

Have fun experimenting with your cooking, that's how I learn. Some stuff works, some others go straight into the bin! :)

Hi,

I've never baked anything WITH a lid! :D My Italian gramma used to bake bread all the time in lidless loaf pans.

Problem is, if I make something and it comes out awful, I don't try it again cause I have no clue what to adjust or what went wrong! :P

Geeze, this cooking stuff is time consuming!! An hour to cook it, half an hour to clean up, but only ten minutes to swallow it down. :lol:
 

Laura

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Mrs. Peel said:
Geeze, this cooking stuff is time consuming!! An hour to cook it, half an hour to clean up, but only ten minutes to swallow it down. :lol:

But it's awesome to master the principles and be able to turn out something delicious from a hodgepodge of ingredients due to sheer creativity and knowledge of cooking chemistry. Also, you can learn to do things fast and easy - I'm all about fast and easy!
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Laura said:
Mrs. Peel said:
Geeze, this cooking stuff is time consuming!! An hour to cook it, half an hour to clean up, but only ten minutes to swallow it down. :lol:

But it's awesome to master the principles and be able to turn out something delicious from a hodgepodge of ingredients due to sheer creativity and knowledge of cooking chemistry. Also, you can learn to do things fast and easy - I'm all about fast and easy!


Those are my thoughts too Mrs. Peel. When I make buckwheat date bread it gets eaten fast, but takes about two hours to make. I need to get some "fast and easy" in my cooking, and everything for that matter :P.
 

Laura

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3D Student said:
Those are my thoughts too Mrs. Peel. When I make buckwheat date bread it gets eaten fast, but takes about two hours to make. I need to get some "fast and easy" in my cooking, and everything for that matter :P.

How can it take two hours to make? I guess you are counting the baking time. It takes me about ten minutes to mix it up and pour it in the pans and get it in the oven.
 

3DStudent

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FOTCM Member
Laura said:
3D Student said:
Those are my thoughts too Mrs. Peel. When I make buckwheat date bread it gets eaten fast, but takes about two hours to make. I need to get some "fast and easy" in my cooking, and everything for that matter :P.

How can it take two hours to make? I guess you are counting the baking time. It takes me about ten minutes to mix it up and pour it in the pans and get it in the oven.

Yeah I was counting cooking time and cleanup. I also seed and chop up the dates pretty fine. And we have an electric stove, so the boiling water part takes a while :P.
 

RedFox

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Have been enjoying cooking a lot recently, and it seems my creative side is coming out! :) So wanted to share a few things I've cooked

This is something I regularly have for my first breakfast (second breakfast usually being the same thing I ate the night before).
It also makes quite a nice desert to follow your evening meal.
I tend to cook up a bunch of buckwheat pancakes every day for myself, so ignoring the time that takes this recipe only takes a minute to prepare.

Takes 3-5 buckwheat pancakes (hot or cold) and place on a microwavable plate.
Sprinkle on cocoa powder (you can skip this if you want, or if you want it Really chocolaty add a table spoon of cocoa to the buckwheat batter when making the pancakes, and sprinkle some of top afterwards).
Add blueberries (I add frozen ones) and sliced banana.
Microwave for 3 and half minutes.

If you have gone for the really chocolaty option, mash the banana up before eating it to balance the bitterness of the cocoa...it is Really chocolaty at this point!

21082010352.jpg


For a quick main meal (preparation time is a few minutes, cooking time is about 10-15 minutes).

Heat up a pan with oil in (if you've got an electric hob you can be chopping your vegetables at this point), and place a fillet of fish in the pan (I used haddock).
Chop a few carrots into sticks, and peel and chip a beetroot into thin slices. Place these in the pan too (you may not have enough room for everything, but the fish will keep hot from the oil easily for 15 minutes after cooking).
After 5-8 minutes flip the fish over (this may be longer than needed but I tend to be cautious when cooking fish or meat), and remove after a further 5-8 minutes.
Flip the vegetables after a few minutes 3-4 and cook for a further 3-4.
As an extra (be careful at this point!! hot oil with water spits hot oil everywhere!!) blanch some salad leaves by adding them to the pan (you can wait for the oil to cool a little), or put the salad in a bowl and pour the oil over it (be careful!). I put some rocket, water cress and spinich in the pan, stirred them round and served it out!
Add salt!! You may not want it as oily as I have it. Beetroot crisps done like this are loooovely!

05092010374.jpg
 

manitoban

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RedFox said:
Have been enjoying cooking a lot recently, and it seems my creative side is coming out! :) So wanted to share a few things I've cooked

Very creative indeed, RedFox, those recipes look delicious! Thank you! :)
 

RedFox

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Thanks :) I seem to have discovered an unknown passion for cooking!

Buckwheat battered Salmon and Sweat Potato Chips

This again is a really simple recipe.

1 Salmon fillet (or haddock or whatever fish you like)
About 200ml of Buckwheat batter (the batter you make for pancakes is fine, but making it with more flour/thicker is a good idea, alternatively use the one from the onions rings recipe)
1 small sweet potato

Heat a pan of oil (can be shallow or deep depending on what you happy cooking with).
Place the fish fillet into the batter and mix until it is fully coated.
Carefully place the fillet into the hot oil, and scrape the remaining batter onto the fish.
Cook for about 8-10 minutes (just to be cautious) each side (or 8-10 minutes if your deep frying it).
*edit to add* the fish can loose water whilst cooking, so be careful as it can spit suddenly in the hot oil.

Peel and thinly slice the sweet potato. Place slices into the hot oil and cook until the under side changes colour (usually it goes lighter, then bubbly, then starts to brown....turn when it starts to brown). The second side will take less time to cook.

Add lots of salt. Enjoy!

21082010356.jpg
 

Alana

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Redfox, thank you very much :) My roommates and i followed a few of your recipes so far, and our mouth palettes were satisfied. And may i also comment at how pretty your plates look! Not only what's in them, but the plates themselves.
 

stellar

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Laura said:
3D Student said:
Those are my thoughts too Mrs. Peel. When I make buckwheat date bread it gets eaten fast, but takes about two hours to make. I need to get some "fast and easy" in my cooking, and everything for that matter :P.

How can it take two hours to make? I guess you are counting the baking time. It takes me about ten minutes to mix it up and pour it in the pans and get it in the oven.

When I'm in a hurry my bread takes the form of muffin sized bread. It all ends up in the same place, down the gob, wheather it's sliced or chunky. ;)
 

Laurentien2

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I baked the carrot cake from the dot connector magazine, vol.10 page 76, yesterday and it is sinfully delicious. I followed the entire recipe except that I didn't put raisin in and I use dates instead of prunes. I did my own apple purée so when I mixed it with the rest of the ingredient it wasn't "rather creamy", maybe my purée lacked some moisture but I corrected it with almond milk, adding it until I got a rather creamy batter. The result is amazing anyway, the cake is moist but firm and each bite bring that amazing spices, carrot and fruit combination. You can taste them all, none of the ingredient overcome the others. I wasn't sure about adding that much of ginger but the end result proved me wrong. As for the icing, I did only half of the recipe and use maple syrup instead of natural sugar and I believe that half the recipe is enough for our taste. Just writhing these short line and I want to run down and eat a piece of the cake :lol:.

Good cooking every one!
 

Tina

Jedi Master
PopHistorian said:
Here's my own engineered recipe for gluten-free buckwheat coconut blueberry muffins. Really good, fast, and so easy that a non-baker shouldn't fear:

mix up well:
3 cage-free, free-range eggs
1 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup grapeseed oil
1/4 cup mix of xylitol/sugar/stevia (any mix) plus 1/4 cup water (or just 1/2 cup agave syrup)
1 tsp vanilla (optional)

then stir in:
3/4 cup buckwheat flour
1/2 cup almond meal/four
1/2 cup unsweetened coconut flour/meal/flakes
1/2 cup or a little more raisins
1/2 cup or a little more blueberries (or any other fruit)

The dough is very fluid, but don't worry. Fill 8 or 9 wells in a buttered or oiled muffin pan

bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for exactly 20 minutes

Comes out sweet and delicious. Eat warm or cold. Keeps for a long time in the refrigerator. Substitutions of flours, fruits, and sweeteners don't seem to hurt, so it's quite a flexible recipe. Modify to your taste. The raisins seem to be the secret to using so little other sweetening.

Let me know if anyone tries.

Just tried these. I used organic maple syrup instead of agave & frozen coconut, threw in a few walnuts (don't seem to have a problem with those) and topped with ghee. I think I'll try them w/o the eggs next time and use dates instead of raisins. Good muffins, I'll make them again. Thanks PopHistorian.
 

Ollie

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Buckwheat pastry

The pastry is based on a recipe provided by Barbara’s Kitchen in The AiA Gluten and Dairy Free Cookbook. At the bottom of the page it is stated as being ‘a really easy, tasty pastry … as easy to handle as traditional pastry, can be rolled thinly without having to be placed between parchment paper and doesn’t crumble or break.’

I found that this is correct even when using buckwheat flour only. (The flours in the original recipe were a mix of rice, tapioca starch and potato (the original also used dairy free Margarine and Xanthan gum).)

Ingredients:
1 1/2C (240g organic) Buckwheat flour
1/4tsp salt
125g butter (cubed and cold), or (Variation 1)* Lard (cubed and cold) (approx 1/2C plus 1tbsp)
1 large egg, beaten, or (V1, V2)* 1/4C (62.5ml) iced water
1tsp (5ml) cider vinegar, or (V3)* 1tsp (5ml) iced water
3tbsp (45ml) iced water
*see below

Method:
Place the butter or lard (fat) in the freezer for 15mins to get really cold.

In a large bowl, mix the flour and salt, lifting into the air to aerate the flour.
Take the fat out of the freezer, cut into cubes and toss into the flour mix. You need to work confidently and quickly, with light fingertips, pressing the fat gently together in the flour mix, and lifting the flour to aerate it. ‘Rubbing in’ this way will avoid coating more flour grains than necessary, thus allowing the flour to absorb sufficient water to make the pastry work. If the fat is allowed to melt (from being too warm and from warm hands, it will be slightly oily) the resultant pastry will be tough, as will be the result of adding too much water. The ‘rubbed in’ flour with evenly distributed fat will look crumbly, although as there is a lot of fat it will start to bind together into larger pieces. This is acceptable.

In a small bowl, lightly beat the egg with the cider vinegar and iced water.

Stir the egg (or water) mix into the ‘rubbed in’ flour using a flat knife to cut, stir, and bring the pastry together. When it looks as if it is all evenly distributed use your hands to bring the pastry together into a ball, cleaning up the bowl as you go along. It will seem impossible at first, looking too dry, but it does come together even if you have to make more than one ball to do it, and combining them. The resultant ball of pastry is sticky, more so than traditional pastry would be.

Knead the ball of pastry for 2-3mins with a little buckwheat flour.

Cut the ball into two portions, (the size depending on requirements), flatten, then cover each portion of pastry with clingfilm and place in a fridge for 1 hr (it makes the pastry less elastic and easier to roll). At this stage it can be frozen too.

On removal from the fridge, knead the pastry a little with the heel of the hand.

Preheat the oven to 220C, 425F, G Mk 7.

Lightly flour the pastry board (worktop, etc), the rolling pin, and on the top of the pastry. Roll the pastry with light, gentle, even pressure. After each roll turn the pastry a quarter turn until you get the desired size, thickness and shape. Keep adding flour to the pastry board and top of the flour as required, as well as when the pastry starts to stick to the rolling pin. It will seem as if it is getting too dry, it’s OK. This pastry rolls well, and responds to ‘overworking’, ‘over handling’ (re-kneading and rerolling) when compared with traditional floured pastry – it doesn’t go tough on baking. It does shrink (traditional pastry effect of overworking), as with buckwheat batters.

Lightly grease pie tray, muffin tin, pie case, etc and form pastry onto/into it. It handles as well as traditional pastry with either the hands or rolling pin to move it into place. It moulds into deep shapes, such as muffin tins and loaf pans, well (this latter shaping was the original reason for my search for a workable G-F pastry – Scotch Black Bun for New Year celebrations). Very little, if any, jigsawing (fitting in pastry to cover tears, gaps and holes) is required compared with other G-F pastry mixes I’ve tried. Prick the base with a fork, to allow any trapped air to escape, and to keep the base flat.

Bake for 10-12mins, until golden brown (10mins for shallow shapes and may need up to 12mins for deeper shapes).

Comments:
The texture is soft to eat, flaky and cuts well (doesn’t break up) with a knife. It is highly acceptable as a pastry.

*Variation 1 – Lard – used for savoury pies to give the ‘right flavour’, and absorbs the meat juices without leaking through, is ‘shorter’ and is said to be flakier. It does not require an egg; needs less water for mixing than butter, but butter contains 15% water which lard does not, so it evens out and results in using the same amount as in the original recipe. The ‘pastry ball’ is stickier, relatively wet – or greasy. It requires more flour, more frequently, to roll, is initially stiffer to mould, but on reworking it works well. The cooked pastry has a drier taste, is floury, it is chewy, and not as soft, or as flaky, as the original butter version. It is highly acceptable as a pastry.

*Variation 2 – no egg. The pastry ball is sticky and tacky. It rolls and moulds well. The baked pastry is crunchier than, not as soft as, the original egg version, and yet cuts well. It is acceptable as a pastry. (An egg equivalent version using ground flaxseed was tried, it was a drier mix and difficult to roll and mould – crumbled and broke - ate crisp, and was too flaky – a bit like a delicate puff cracker, breaking and crumbling – not worth bothering with.)

*Variation 3 – cider vinegar replace by iced water. No apparent effect compared with the original version. It is highly acceptable as a pastry.

Take your pick of the recipes and enjoy. :)
 
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