Gluten-free Recipes

annp

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Am re-posting (moving ) this from the Ultra Simple Diet..

I have recently discovered a delicious flat bread made from chickpea (garbanzo) flour. Fortunately there are numerous international grocery stores in North TX where different flours can be found inexpensively.

The bread is a bit like a flat cornbread and is really easy to make - I think it would go great with soups or for just an afternoon snack. Best of all - it does not contain any evil ingredients. Here is a copy of the basic recipe from Mark Bittman (found at
_http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E05E6D7153FF93AA25753C1A9639C8B63)

Socca (Farinata)
Time: 45 minutes

1 cup chickpea flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon, at least, ground black pepper
4 to 6 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 large onion, thinly sliced, optional
1 tablespoon fresh rosemary leaves, optional.

1. Heat oven to 450 degrees. Put a well-seasoned or nonstick 12-inch pizza pan or cast-iron skillet in oven. Sift chickpea flour into a bowl; add salt and pepper; then slowly add 1 cup lukewarm water, whisking to eliminate lumps. Stir in 2 tablespoons olive oil. Cover, and let sit while oven heats, or as long as 12 hours. Batter should be about the consistency of heavy cream.
2. If using onion and rosemary, stir them into batter. Pour 2 tablespoons oil into heated pan, and swirl to cover pan evenly. Pour in batter, and bake 12 to 15 minutes, or until pancake is firm and edges set. Heat broiler, and brush top of socca with 1 or 2 tablespoons of oil if it looks dry.
3. Set socca a few inches away from broiler for a few minutes, just long enough to brown it spottily. Cut it into wedges, and serve hot, or at least warm.
 

Tina

Jedi Master
annp said:
Am re-posting (moving ) this from the Ultra Simple Diet..

I have recently discovered a delicious flat bread made from chickpea (garbanzo) flour. Fortunately there are numerous international grocery stores in North TX where different flours can be found inexpensively.

I happened to have some garbanzo flour in the pantry and tried this bread recipe. YUM!! :D Thanks so much for posting. I had an onion in the garden and a rosemary bush in the front yard so I was set. The added bonus is it's so easy to make.
 

Scheherazade

The Force is Strong With This One
"Russian Salad"
Cook together the same amount of peas, chopped carrots and chopped potatoes. After cooled, mix with Laura's mayonnaise, if your diet permits, add previously cooked fish (tuna is excellent). I like with a LOT of mayonnaise.

"Roasted tomatoes"
Cut each tomato at half, cover with olive oil, oregano and mozzarella, put at oven until cheese is golden. Optional: cover with chopped olives.

"Olives snack"
Make some cuts in the olives (to better absorb the taste), put some with olive oil and a LOT of chopped garlic. Leave overnight.
 

D Rusak

Jedi Council Member
Just tried making socca- this is a fantastic recipe!! Thanks for sharing, AnnP. Definitely use the onion and fresh rosemary, I don't think these should be optional! So good, I just had this for dinner with some green beans and tomatoes I cooked up.
 

annp

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Apparently this can be used as a pizza base - here is a quote from a recipe online. Have not tried it yet - but its on the list.

From.. _http://www.vegsource.com/mcdrecipes/messages/9919107.html

"For socca pizza...when I add my tomato sauce, I also throw on pizza toppings: sliced bell peppers, diced onions, sliced artichoke hearts, mushrooms, black olives, etc., whatever kind of pizza toppings you like...I sprinkle the top with dried basil and bake until the tomato sauce is glazed through the socca. takes a little bit longer to bake if you're making pizza with it."
--------------

I love anything easy and fast - don't have a lot of time for preparation and by the time I get home to the kitchen I am starved...so anything that can be prepared quickly is a bonus!! And I am loving the Asian grocery store nearby...so many flours/beans/peas that are on the diet at much better prices!! :cool:

Ann
 

Beau

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
annp said:
I love anything easy and fast - don't have a lot of time for preparation and by the time I get home to the kitchen I am starved...so anything that can be prepared quickly is a bonus!! And I am loving the Asian grocery store nearby...so many flours/beans/peas that are on the diet at much better prices!!

One thing I love, and that is really quick, is to make burritos with the brown rice flour wraps/tortillas. My favorite kind of meat to use is the thin steak that you can cut into little strips and add cayenne, cumin, garlic powder, salt and pepper. I usually chop an onion or two up as well, but all in all I usually get everything done and eaten in around an hour. You can also add black or pinto beans and other toppings you prefer, like lettuce, diced tomatoes, and bell peppers. It's also really good to have some homemade mayo made already, it's a really good substitute for sour cream. :cool:

Sometimes I'll use lean chicken or ground bison meat as well, and it never gets old!
 

Ellipse

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
from D Rusak;
My mom still makes all of her cookies every year, even though she can no longer eat them because she is celiac. I decided to adapt this recipe for her. While not the most elaborate cookie these ARE quite addictive!

1/2 c. oil
4 oz. unsweetened chocolate, melted or 3/4 c. cocoa powder w/ 2 tsp. oil
2 c. sugar
4 eggs
2 tsp. vanilla
2 c. rice flour
2 tbsp. tapioca starch
2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1 c. powdered sugar

Mix oil, sugar,vanilla& chocolate. Beat in eggs. Add flour, starch, baking powder & salt. Chill several hours. Heat oven to 350F. Drop dough from a tsp. in powdered sugar & roll. Make balls and put 2 in. apart on a greased cookie sheet. Bake 10-12 min.

Makes about 3 dozen cookies.

I'd try your receipe but something failed, I got a soft mixture. When you say "chill several hours", you mean "leave it on the table" or "put it to the refrigerator" (I've done the last) ?

Thx.


For French readers :
c. = cup = tasse à café
tsp. = teaspoon = cuillère à café
tbsp. = tablespoon = cuillère à soupe
 

D Rusak

Jedi Council Member
Hi,

I believe I chilled this in the refrigerator overnight. It was a couple of years ago. It's not going to be a super hard mixture but it should be firm enough that one can easily roll it into shape without it falling apart. Were you able to bake these? How did they come out?
 
L

Lauranimal

Guest
I haven't done this one in a few years, but today I got a craving and went for it! And it is wicked simple.

I use a large leaf of romaine lettuce for my wrap, but I will admit, that is a tad messy. Can also be done with the brown rice wraps.

The filling: a layer of smoked salmon, a sprinkling of chopped red onion, a sprinkling of chopped roasted red pepper, a good squeeze of lemon and just enough cream-cheese to compliment the salmon.

Roll ... and MUNCH!!!


(I do miss bagels! I've tried a few gluten free ones over the years, but they sucked too much to warrant the high glycemic carbs.)
 

PopHistorian

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
For those seeking ingredients, I saw on the Gluten Free Network site some people raving about Kinnikinnick Foods, in Canada. They sell seemingly all the key gluten-free baking ingredients, as well as their own gluten-free flour mixes, and their own finished baked products (breads, etc.). I just placed an order and will see how it goes. _http://www.kinnikinnick.com/
 

PopHistorian

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Here's my own engineered recipe for gluten-free buckwheat coconut blueberry muffins. Really good, fast, and so easy that a non-baker shouldn't fear:

mix up well:
3 cage-free, free-range eggs
1 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup grapeseed oil
1/4 cup mix of xylitol/sugar/stevia (any mix) plus 1/4 cup water (or just 1/2 cup agave syrup)
1 tsp vanilla (optional)

then stir in:
3/4 cup buckwheat flour
1/2 cup almond meal/four
1/2 cup unsweetened coconut flour/meal/flakes
1/2 cup or a little more raisins
1/2 cup or a little more blueberries (or any other fruit)

The dough is very fluid, but don't worry. Fill 8 or 9 wells in a buttered or oiled muffin pan

bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for exactly 20 minutes

Comes out sweet and delicious. Eat warm or cold. Keeps for a long time in the refrigerator. Substitutions of flours, fruits, and sweeteners don't seem to hurt, so it's quite a flexible recipe. Modify to your taste. The raisins seem to be the secret to using so little other sweetening.

Let me know if anyone tries.
 

zlyja

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Hi everyone!

Everything looks really good! I ought to try some one day. Especially brownies ... yum! Anyways, I recently did a pie that I think is candida-diet friendly, although I'm not quite sure. I didn't have any noticeable problems after eating some, however. It's a butternut squash pie, great for Thanksgiving if you have a sweet tooth.

I got the recipe for the crust from here: _http://hubpages.com/hub/The-Candida-Diet. It calls for:

1 cup ground pecans

1/4 cup melted clarified butter (I think that it's a pain to make, however, so I just used regular melted butter.)

Just grind the pecans in a food processor and then stir it with the butter. Then just press it into the pie pan like a cracker crust.

For the filling, I used:

2 teaspoons cinnamon

1 tsp. ginger

1 tsp. nutmeg

1 tsp. cloves

2 eggs

1.5 cups of cooked butternut squash pulp

1 tsp. baking soda

1 tsp. lemon juice (or just squeeze half a lemon's worth of juice)

Cut three or four ripe or nearly ripe butternut squash in half and scoop out the seeds. Steam them for about thirty minutes (I just use a potato steamer) and let them cool when soft enough. Then scoop out the pulp (don't use the skins!) and put it into a food processor. Run the food processor until adequately mashed, then put in everything else and run it again. Pour the filling into the pie crust and then put it in the oven. Bake it for about 40 minutes at 325 degrees if using a convection oven, 350 if not.

That's it! Mine was just a bit less stiff than a regular pumpkin pie, but it tasted just as good. The butternut squash themselves are fairly sweet (1 cup has 4 grams of sugar), so you really don't need a sweetener. But if you use pumpkin, you should use a sweetener. If you can't eat eggs, I guess you could try a thickener like arrowroot flour or guar gum, although I've never tried it myself.

Anyways, just my two cents. Sorry that it's so long, and sorry if a recipe like this has already been posted. Thanks. :)
 

Masamune

Jedi Council Member
PopHistorian said:
For those seeking ingredients, I saw on the Gluten Free Network site some people raving about Kinnikinnick Foods, in Canada. They sell seemingly all the key gluten-free baking ingredients, as well as their own gluten-free flour mixes, and their own finished baked products (breads, etc.). I just placed an order and will see how it goes. _http://www.kinnikinnick.com/

Hi PopHistorian, I have eaten a lot of Kinnikinnick foods in the past and they do taste good but a lot of their products have allergens in them. A lot of their products have eggs, soy, sugar, corn, and potato which I try to avoid. I haven't been able to find any of their products that I can tolerate recently. Also some of their products got pulled from a health food store near me because their ingredients did not meet the company standards.

I have found this brand to be good, they avoid all the common allergens and keep the ingredient list simple: Namaste Foods. They have a dedicated facility free of: gluten, wheat, corn, soy, potato, peanuts, tree nuts, dairy, and casein. Their selection is not that big but they have some good mixes for bread, cookies, muffins etc.
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Masamune said:
I have found this brand to be good, they avoid all the common allergens and keep the ingredient list simple: Namaste Foods.

Yeah I've seen that brand on Amazon and it looks like they have some nice baking mixes you can get in bulk there. I haven't personally tried them yet though, but I have some Bob's Red Mill GF baking mix I'm waiting to use after I'm done detoxing. I've also seen a brand called Pamela's Products: _http://www.pamelasproducts.com/index.html, which looks good.
 

PopHistorian

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Hi Masamune -- thanks for that insight. I did notice that several of their finished products had unrecognizable ingredients, maybe "stretching" to get revenue-producing products in the line, though they varied quite a bit, but mainly, I saw that they are selling separately the base ingredients for making gluten-free stuff: tapioca, potato, guar, xanthan, various other flours, etc.
 
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