Fossil footprints show humans in North America more than 21,000 years ago

Debra

Jedi Council Member
Interesting, I wonder if the release of the findings is to try and stir up the Indigenous population again?

"The footprints are the earliest firm evidence for humans in the Americas and show people must have arrived here before the last Ice Age."

210922-ancient-footprints-jm-1415-f8525c.jpg

The team has studied the footprints at White Sands National Park for years, following the tracks with ground-penetrating radar and excavating trenches.
From the article:
"The tracks at one location have been revealed as both the earliest known footprints and the oldest firm evidence of humans anywhere in the Americas, showing that people lived there between 21,000 and 23,000 years ago — several thousand years earlier than scientists once believed."
[...]
“We’d been suspicious of the age for a while, and so now we finally have that it’s really exciting,” Bustos said. “One of the neat things is that you can see mammoth prints in the layers a meter or so above the human footprints, so that just helps to confirm the whole story.”
210922-ancient-footprints-jm-1411-fa0dd5.jpg
210922-ancient-foot-prints-jm-1420-18858e.jpg

"New research into the ancient footprints at White Sands National Park establishes they are the earliest-known evidence of humans in North America.
Trails of footprints called "ghost tracks" have been seen in the White Sands area for years, but usually only when the ground was wet.NPS, USGS and Bournemoth University"
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
I think there was some evidence at another dig putting humans in the Americas about 35K years ago if I remember it right. Naturally, the findings were soundly rejected by mainstream. So, this is another crack in the official story.
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member

Although the newfound footprints are not the oldest evidence of humans' arrival in the Americas, they may be the first unequivocal proof that people were there during the last ice age, scientists noted.

The arrival of the first people in the Americas was a key step in humanity's expansion across the planet, but the precise timing of this milestone remains hotly contested. Based on stone tools dating back roughly 13,000 years, archaeologists had long suggested that people from the prehistoric culture known as the Clovis were the first to migrate to the Americas.


However, researchers recently unearthed a great deal of evidence of pre-Clovis artifacts. For example, last year scientists revealed that stone artifacts discovered in Chiquihuite Cave in central Mexico were at least 26,500 years old; computer models found the cave's location was so far inland in the Americas, and thus so distant from the Old World from which human migrants arrived, that it suggested that humans might have first entered the New World as early as 33,000 years ago.
 
Top Bottom