Emergency Power Generation/Storage, EMP Protection, Heating/Cooling, Handy Tools and Tricks

Cosmos

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What follows is a shorter version of the setup I build that you can build relatively easily yourself too if you have a bit of money at your disposal. [I'll include the rough price in brackets at the end of each item/setup]. After that I also share some stripped down versions/ideas of the said setup that you could try as well which are more "low-cost" options. I will also try to not get into too many specifics to make it more concise. If anyone has any questions about anything, feel free to ask, and I can for example expand on the given subject, how I found the information, how I came to the given conclusions and why I choose certain products/approaches etc.

The reason I say that is because with each approach/product, there are a lot of considerations/calculations/experiments/research/ideas that have been applied to why and how I choose that specific device or approach. Also, be careful, because my setup is based around German/EU Plug/AC requirements and "powering a house" with three people, and it is meant to provide fairly reliable energy for longer time in which bigger power drains can also be used from time to time for "longer periods". That means if you live in the US for example, there are other Plug/AC standards for certain products. But everything mentioned is also available in those non EU Plug/AC standards. It also means that it might be too overkill for most.

In a roundabout way, my setup is meant to fulfill/prepare for the following scenarios (among others):

- Emergency Short-term energy/heat/cooling independents and generation and protection against EMPs at the same time
- Long-term energy/heat/cooling independents and generation in case of prolonged power outages and/or EMPs (many years - lifetime)
- EMP protection for key elements of the setup
- EMP protection and energy input for key electrical devices that would be good if they can function under power outage conditions
- Worst-case scenario considerations and priorities in terms of energy management and conservation

Doesn't mean anything like that ever happens, just that it might be good to be prepared if it happens. That's how I think about it and why I set it up as I did. Also keep my previous post in mind. Also, in everything I do here (and in general also) I'm always trying to find the best solution and always prioritize quality over price. IMO it is always better to research stuff thoroughly and use/buy only the best quality product you can get (within your budget) which usually means you have to pay more. I always apply that principle to things that are a bit more expensive and that need to run reliably. For stuff that is pretty cheap in itself I sometimes break that rule. I'm always looking for the best (and believe me, I research a lot before making a decision). I'm perfectly willing and happy to pay a good amount of money as long as the product has a very good quality and meets my high requirements in terms of quality and durability/compatibility. In other words: I would buy a quality product for a high price any day over a cheap one that could break any time and likely needs to be replaced again and again and isn't reliable. I also like to always cover all possible angles/scenarios that I can think of. A good example of this is the topic of solar panels: I did A LOT of research on it over the years and I found IMO the best solution out there (keeping scenarios such as bad weather conditions and many others in mind) that is a bit more pricey but IMO the best you can get unless you are very rich.

I realize that not everyone can or is willing to spend that amount of money, thus I will present much cheaper, stripped down solutions revolving/based around my basic setup later on.

My basic setup (excluding many other additional things not mentioned):

1 -
"
Bluetti AC200P" AC/Solar/Car Generator/Battery= 2000Wh/2000W = Fast Charge = Surge Power 4800W [1,699€]

2 - "Champion 2000 Watt LPG Dual Fuel Inverter Generator" = 2000W Petrol / 1800W LPG (and/or Propane). [939,99 €] Notice that the Propane tanks mentioned below will/can also be used for cooking/heating if you have a cheap Gas oven/stove/heater as mentioned in the previous posts!!!
  • 1 Motor-Oil= "FANFARO FF6505-5 SPX" [13,82 €]
  • 8 times 11kg Propane Gas Tanks + 8 times Gas [8 x 35€ + 8 x 22,80€ = 462,40€]. Notice that refilling one bottle costs 22,80€ and you only pay for the bottle itself (35€) once (to own it).
  • 2 times 5kg Propane Gas Tanks + 2 times Gas [2 x 29€ + 2 x 11,55€ = 81,10€]. Notice that refilling one bottle costs 11,55€ and you only pay for the bottle itself (29€) once (to own it).
  • 3 times 20L Petrol Tanks + Petrol [3 x 32,94€ + ca. 1,60 € x 60L = 194,82 €]. Make sure to use/replace the Petrol at least once a year with new petrol (but preferably, more like every half year or so). Petrol degrades over time!

3 - "EcoFlow RIVER Pro Portable Power Station" AC/Solar/Car Generator/Battery= 720Wh/600W = Fast Charge = Surge Power up to 1800W with the so called X-Boost mode! See example here, here, here, here, here, here or here! [749€]

4 - 2 times EMP proof Faraday Bags: "OGT Large Faraday Bag 126L, Room for all of your Electronics". [2 x $369.99 = $739,98]. Notice that I have put every single electrical device mentioned above (including all cables) into those two bags with still quite some space left in there (even though I haven't even mentioned all the electrical devices, cables, batteries, small power banks and tools I have also in there that are not listed above!). That means even if a comet induced EMP or CME type frying happens there is at least potential hope that you can power important things! But that is no certainty of course.

Some basic things to consider in terms of EMPs:

Do some research on EMPs and really think it through! You will realize for example that you have to protect not only the power generator and solar panels mentioned above against an EMP but also the devices you want to power after that emergency, including such critical things as cables! You will also realize that especially newer devices such as cellphones, Laptops etc, are charged via USB-C type of cables that have chips in them! So, that means your devices are basically useless if you don't put the charging cable in the EMP bag as well! What good is a functioning cellphone and the needed power generator for example if you have forgotten to put such a loading cable that has a chip build in into the bag? None! You can't recharge the Cellphone! Same for date transfer between your cellphone/laptop/GPS device etc and other devices such as hard drives. Also, make sure that you put all necessary batteries and power banks into the bag! The mentioned Faraday Bag might also be able to protect against some effects of CMEs but as with the comet or nuclear induced EMPs, nobody really knows. It depends on the severity among many other factors (many of which we might not even be aware of). IMO at least it is worth a try.

Maintaining all Batteries!:

Make sure that you create a list (such as this rough template I created around my setup (I excluded many things for privacy)) in which you list all items in the setup that have batteries in them or use batteries and you want to work if you don't have power and/or there is a EMP. Batteries need to be recharged every couple of months in order for them to not degrade and/or drain. If you don't do that and think you can just store those batteries for years you will wake up with a bad surprise, because at best they are degraded/drained substantially and at worst are kaputt! Depending on the type of battery, the timespan you can store it before you should recharge differs. In my setup for example, "for the worst" type of batteries, it is recommended to charge them every 3-6 months for storage. Thus, I figured it would be best that I recharge ALL batteries in my setup every two months to cover all eventualities! It is also a good way to ensure that every battery/generator/device is fully loaded/functional when an emergency hits.

[(04.08.2022) Edit to the "Maintaining all Batteries!.:" part above: As I have found out by now, depending on the type of battery you are using (for example: NiMH, Lithium Ion, LiFePO4 etc.), and the specific brand/product; if you store them long term, the way you have to maintain them can be quite different from what I said above! Best way to look for how to maintain your specific battery is by looking for what the manufacturer of the product recommends for long term storage (sometimes but not always found in the users manual). If you can't find a recommendation from the manufacturer, the next best thing you can/should do is to look up how you need to maintain your specific type of battery (Lithium Ion, for example) for long term storage, on the internet. Be aware that if you don't follow those long term maintenance/storage recommendations for your specific battery/product and/or you are using a wrong method (always keeping it fully charged, for example) for your type of battery/product, that you can do serious damage to the battery and even destroy it in a fairly short amount of time! You can find a rough guide here for example, for how to maintain different types of battery chemestries.]

Finally, I'll include some pictures.

What follows is just one of the two 120W "OFF Grid Trek" solar blankets powering the "EcoFlow RIVER Pro Portable Power Station" via two 5-Meter extension cables (all mentioned above in Point 3), through a window into my room in the house, on a fairly good weather day in the October morning hours around 49th parallel north:

View attachment 50988

Close up of the solar blanket in action:

View attachment 50989

Inside the hose powering the Ecoflow:

View attachment 50990

Close up:

View attachment 50991

Next, all key electronics stored in the above-mentioned two EMP bags from "Off Grid Trek" (Point 4). In those two bags all electronics (batteries, power banks, cellphones, walkie-talkies, kindle type readers cables, GPS devices, Flashlights, lighters etc) including the big Bluetti Power Station, the smaller Ecoflow power station, 5 times 120W Bluetti Solar Panels , 2x 120W OFF Grid Trek Solar Panels, 2 smaller 28,5 Watt Off Grid Trek Solar Panels and a bunch of other stuff is stored. And still quite some space left in both bags! Notice how little room/space is wasted (see cup for size reference):

View attachment 50992


Next, I'll explain some of the advantages that our big setup provides for different types of scenarios. And then I'll present a number of lower cost setups/ideas depending on budget (very cheap to moderately expensive).

Just a short but important note on the quoted post above, from earlier in the thread;

A couple of days ago I added the following note to the „Maintaining all Batteries!:“ section:

[(04.08.2022) Edit to the "Maintaining all Batteries!.:" part above: As I have found out by now, depending on the type of battery you are using (for example: NiMH, Lithium Ion, LiFePO4 etc.), and the specific brand/product; if you store them long term, the way you have to maintain them can be quite different from what I said above! Best way to look for how to maintain your specific battery is by looking for what the manufacturer of the product recommends for long term storage (sometimes but not always found in the users manual). If you can't find a recommendation from the manufacturer, the next best thing you can/should do is to look up how you need to maintain your specific type of battery (Lithium Ion, for example) for long term storage, on the internet. Be aware that if you don't follow those long term maintenance/storage recommendations for your specific battery/product and/or you are using a wrong method (always keeping it fully charged, for example) for your type of battery/product, that you can do serious damage to the battery and even destroy it in a fairly short amount of time! You can find a rough guide here for example, for how to maintain different types of battery chemestries.]
 

Neil

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
I've thought off and about having some kind of off grid solar system as a backup, but I'm not sure how far into the doomsday prepper mentality I really want to go. It sure would be nice to generate my own electricity and have a modicum of comfort if the grid goes down, but would I realistically stand a chance in that kind of a world? This is basically the setup I'm looking at, but due to supply chain issues I will probably piece it together on my own: 1920 WATT SOLAR 6000 WATT PURE SINE INVERTER CHARGER 120/240VAC 24VDC SOLAR KIT The main reason for such a large system is that I need enough horsepower to run my well pump and have water. I also have freezers that I would need to keep running for awhile, and some A/C would be nice. The system would only be practical for long-term power outages, as I already have a gas generator for the short-term stuff. Also, it's only useful if there is NOT an EMP event. While I might be able to insulate the system itself, saving all of the peripherals will be impossible short of building a bomb shelter. I don't have the $10K to spend on it, but I have plenty of available credit! But I don't like credit card bills either. If money is going to be worthless anyway, might as well get it while it's "on sale"...maybe. Decisions, decisions...
 

LQB

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I've thought off and about having some kind of off grid solar system as a backup, but I'm not sure how far into the doomsday prepper mentality I really want to go. It sure would be nice to generate my own electricity and have a modicum of comfort if the grid goes down, but would I realistically stand a chance in that kind of a world? This is basically the setup I'm looking at, but due to supply chain issues I will probably piece it together on my own: 1920 WATT SOLAR 6000 WATT PURE SINE INVERTER CHARGER 120/240VAC 24VDC SOLAR KIT The main reason for such a large system is that I need enough horsepower to run my well pump and have water. I also have freezers that I would need to keep running for awhile, and some A/C would be nice. The system would only be practical for long-term power outages, as I already have a gas generator for the short-term stuff. Also, it's only useful if there is NOT an EMP event. While I might be able to insulate the system itself, saving all of the peripherals will be impossible short of building a bomb shelter. I don't have the $10K to spend on it, but I have plenty of available credit! But I don't like credit card bills either. If money is going to be worthless anyway, might as well get it while it's "on sale"...maybe. Decisions, decisions...
Neil - I've been trying to help some folks to minimize cost with objectives similar to yours. Take a look at these components:

4X AGM and Lithium Deep Cycle Batteries and Accessories

Charge controller Power Inverters, DC To AC Inverters & Solar Panels | AIMS Power

Inverter 48V 48-volt-pure-sine-inverter-charger

Remote: Power Inverters, DC To AC Inverters & Solar Panels | AIMS Power

DC breaker box: Midnite Solar Baby Box for 4 Breakers

Breakers (2X): Din Rail Mount Circuit Breakers (for 6-panels)

AIMS is pretty good for the major components. I prefer 48V battery bank to keep the DC current down (4X - 12 V batts wired in series). The AIMS remote (wired) can be placed anywhere in the house and is great for monitoring the system without having to go outside and is very useful as you adjust solar useage to what the system is capable of (depending on solar conditions, night/day, etc) You can get your solar panels here (from Alt-e):

Heliene 360 Watt Black Mono

You can start off with 3 panels wired in series and add panels in sets of 3 at a time. Each set of 3 panels is input to the DC breaker box prior to connection to the charge controller.

You will need one of these to interface with your existing panel box:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B012DHO4A4/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

This manual Xfer switch will allow you to run your 240V pump plus 4 more house circuits (your choice).

The batts are AGM sealed but I would build an enclosure near the panels to house the batts, inverter, charge controller, and breaker box. You can line the internal of the enclosure with a cheap metallized (both sides) insulation and screen a couple of vents for temp control. This will give some solar EMP protection.

Keep in mind that when the sun is high you will have extra day-time power to burn above what is needed to charge the batt bank.

Prices keep going up but right now the total of the above is about $5k ($6K for 6 panels).
 

Cosmos

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Just a short but important note on the first post in this thread;

I added the following note today:

[Edit (28.08.2022): See here and here for a possible good/easy wood stove solution.]

For the record, I repost the mentioned thread here, called "Wood Stoves and Tents from "Russian Bear Market": Heating, Cooking, Water heating and more":

Recently I came across a company with the name "RBM" which stands for "Russian Bear Market" and they seem to sell their products to the western market manly on their website, which is called hot-tent.com. I came across them because, out of curiosity, I was looking for good tents and I saw Rene (the owner and chief of offgridtrek.com) starting to redistribute their products on his website (Off Grid Trek was mentioned in this thread on the forum in several of my posts, for their outstanding solar blankets).

It seems to me that they sell very good wood stoves (in three different sizes and two different sizes of water tanks) and tents (in many different sizes). I think it should be relatively easy to use and set up the wood stoves also in other settings besides the tents (for which they were designed).

Long story short, I don't own any of their products myself at this point, but from what I have seen and researched, their products seem to be very good, well-made, well-designed, very easy to set up and carry, while they do pay a lot of attention to detail and seem to have thought things through quite a bit. The fact that Rene recommends them and started to redistribute their products also gives credence to that IMO. It seems Americans and Canadians are still able to get their products relatively easily. As for the rest of the (western) world (like the EU for example), I'm not so sure. You would need to look that up.

Below you can see Rene. In the first video segment you see; how he sets up and describes one of their large tents, followed by, the second video segment; a presentation of their biggest wood stove:



The wood stove can be used for heating of course, but also, for cooking and heating up water separately!

Here you can see the cooking in action in one of their smaller tents at -37°C:


Here an example of setting up their smallest and cheapest tent, called "Sputnik 3":


I won't mention all the features the Stove and Tents have. Sufficient to say that they have paid a lot of attention to detail and what is really needed in a real life situation. All of their products seem to be designed around being able to work (and quickly set up) in very cold temperatures.

As a side note, as you can see in the second video above, Rene recommends fire paste, in order to be able to fire up wood under any conditions quickly. Rene doesn't say which brand he is using, but from the looks and description, it might be the following fire paste from a brand called "Coghlan":

 
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Yupo

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Inergy has come out with a very small solar generator/back up power supply. Very lightweight and portable. It is enough to power some essential things for a few days. Can be recharged a variety of ways. Pretty affordable. Kodiak LT
I use their larger Flex modular system at my home, which is almost infinitely expandable as far as battery modules and panel sets that can be added to it. Flex 1500 Power Station
Right now it is in portable/unmounted mode and I use it for back up and an outdoor power source. My goal is to get more and better panels roof mounted by next summer, with enough batteries to run the basics. I'm pretty frugal with power use. I have large, relatively thin panels that I can easily lift and hang inside my windows on hooks for charging. I have 3 batteries, which makes the thing heavy. With one battery (as it comes) it is easy to lift. I've set this rig (and cables) into a 1950's wicker hamper, and then I put that on a small dolly so I can just roll it all into a closet, along with the panels when not needed. They don't sell these panels anymore, but I really like them: Inergy Solar Linx 100 Watt Flexible Solar Panel
They were MUCH less expensive from Inergy when I bought them with my system. Anyway, I'll want something more substantial for roof installation. Best things about this system are the portability and expandability. I'd describe myself as technically challenged. I had no problems figuring out how to use it. It really is plug and play. There is a way to tie it in to the house power, but that is going to be down the road for me.
 

Yupo

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I've thought off and about having some kind of off grid solar system as a backup, but I'm not sure how far into the doomsday prepper mentality I really want to go. It sure would be nice to generate my own electricity and have a modicum of comfort if the grid goes down, but would I realistically stand a chance in that kind of a world? This is basically the setup I'm looking at, but due to supply chain issues I will probably piece it together on my own: 1920 WATT SOLAR 6000 WATT PURE SINE INVERTER CHARGER 120/240VAC 24VDC SOLAR KIT The main reason for such a large system is that I need enough horsepower to run my well pump and have water. I also have freezers that I would need to keep running for awhile, and some A/C would be nice. The system would only be practical for long-term power outages, as I already have a gas generator for the short-term stuff. Also, it's only useful if there is NOT an EMP event. While I might be able to insulate the system itself, saving all of the peripherals will be impossible short of building a bomb shelter. I don't have the $10K to spend on it, but I have plenty of available credit! But I don't like credit card bills either. If money is going to be worthless anyway, might as well get it while it's "on sale"...maybe. Decisions, decisions...
Maybe put in a hand pump for water access, just to be safe? How deep is your water table?
Best investments might be hardening your home against weather, improving insulation for comfort and energy efficiency, window coatings depending on your situation. Also depending on your area, consider hardening against social unrest. People are getting desperate even now. So many people in my area have lost their HVAC units because thieves are destroying them just to steal the copper and freon.
 

Rhansen

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
The only problem with a hand pump in a well is it will typically be either a hand pump or a submersible. It might be possible to fit both - maybe.
If there is room, a small bailer will work as a backup. A hand cranked peristaltic pump will also work as long as the static water level is no more than ~28' below the wellhead.

 

Neil

Jedi Council Member
FOTCM Member
I don't think the hand pump would work. The well is 180 ft deep and it's approximately 100ft to the top of the water table, depending on the weather.

There isn't much insulation left on the bottom of the house as it is built on stilts and was never enclosed. It was gradually depleted by rats, birds, squirrels, and raccoons over the years. My current system is that the air is set on 83 while the heat is set on 65. It is just cool enough to keep dew from forming on the countertops in the morning and prevent sweating when doing basic household tasks. The A/C cycles occasionally from about 11 AM to midnight, but my electric bill is staying below $100/month even with inflated prices. While it would be possible to run the central unit on solar, it's probably too energy intensive to be practical. I have a 400 watt window unit which has been hurricane tested and can actually be used to cool the whole house, although I don't know how long it would last with continuous use. It takes about 24 hours to drop the temperature from 90 to 75. That's probably what I would be using on solar. Central heat is a nice luxury, but not a necessity in my climate, and it's far too energy hungry to run on solar. I have small heaters, and my bed is heated, so only that would be supported by the solar system. Most days I can get through January and February with no heat at all, the temperature drops to the mid 60s at night and then I let the sun glare through all of the windows on the south and west side of the house in the afternoon which heats it up to 75-80. When the temperature drops at night, it has a lot of stored energy to overcome that I got essentially for free before it gets chilly. This doesn't work quite so well on nights the temperature gets anywhere near freezing, but that's a rare enough occurrence that I can probably live with it. I've thought about window film before and figured it would help me in the summer and hurt in the winter and so decided just to leave it alone. How much the ice age will affect me at 28 degrees latitude is an open question.

The copper stripping phenomenon was a thing back in 06/07 when construction was hot, but never got too bad in my area. They were mostly targeting new construction in subdivisions at night. I live far enough in the woods that I'm not a prime target. They could get away with it if I'm not home, otherwise they will be staring down the barrel of a rifle.
 

Mariama

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Although the following video is a recap of what we have been discussing on our forum for a number of years now some ideas may still be worthwhile for those who haven't started prepping yet or haven't given much thought to preparations for hard times.

A couple of things I found interesting were:

* Have enough extension cords at hand (spoken by someone who lived through power outages)

* The importance of a carbon monoxide detector when using propane or candles or what have you as fuel

* The value of thermal mass. For instance use bricks lying in the sunshine and bring them indoors at the end of the day and they will give off some heat during the night. The same goes for cans of jars filled with water heated by the sun. I don't know how useful it is, but I thought it was interesting.

* When it is cold outside (colder than inside your fridge) put your pots and pans outdoors and at the end of the day put them in your fridge again. This will carry you through till the next day if there's no power.


@Cosmos, thank you for this thread! I find that I keep going back to it as I can't take everything in at once, so it helps revisiting your information every now and then, but that's just me.
 

T.C.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
This is a variation of a ‘flower pot heater’. It’s built using 6 tea-light candles, some bricks, and a pan.

The creator raised the temp of a small room by almost four degrees over a couple of hours. There’s a small amount of carbon monoxide generated, 10ppm, which is considered within safe levels, but it’s recommended to use a carbon monoxide detector if you’re going to do it.

 

Mariama

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Some basic things to consider in terms of EMPs:

Do some research on EMPs and really think it through! You will realize for example that you have to protect not only the power generator and solar panels mentioned above against an EMP but also the devices you want to power after that emergency, including such critical things as cables! You will also realize that especially newer devices such as cellphones, Laptops etc, are charged via USB-C type of cables that have chips in them! So, that means your devices are basically useless if you don't put the charging cable in the EMP bag as well! What good is a functioning cellphone and the needed power generator for example if you have forgotten to put such a loading cable that has a chip build in into the bag? None! You can't recharge the Cellphone! Same for date transfer between your cellphone/laptop/GPS device etc and other devices such as hard drives. Also, make sure that you put all necessary batteries and power banks into the bag! The mentioned Faraday Bag might also be able to protect against some effects of CMEs but as with the comet or nuclear induced EMPs, nobody really knows. It depends on the severity among many other factors (many of which we might not even be aware of). IMO at least it is worth a try.
Perhaps it is a silly question, but I was wondering whether a Faraday bag blocks the signals of one's mobile and thus may also protect against looters who could keep a laptop in their vehicle, sensing if one still has an active mobile or cordless phone or not. James Wesley Rawles suggested this possibility in his book How to Survive The End of the World as we Know it (I think the Crew discussed this book at one point during one of their shows?). This is what he says:
One further note: We now live in the age of Bluetooth, WTSHTF, if you have a wireless network for your home computers, you should plan to turn the transmitter off and use it as a strictly "hardwired" Ethernet device. A clever looter might leave a laptop turned on in his vehicle, sensing when the vehicle passes an active wireless network. Even if you keep blackout shutters up - making your house look like all of your neighbors' homes that are without power - an active wireless network could mark your house as a lucrative target. Ditto for cell phones and cordless phones. Assuming that the phone circuits are still working during a period of lawlessness (not likely, but possible), be sure to switch to landline only for the duration.
I don't know whether the author is being super cautious or not, but I just wanted to mention it.
 

Cosmos

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Perhaps it is a silly question, but I was wondering whether a Faraday bag blocks the signals of one's mobile and thus may also protect against looters who could keep a laptop in their vehicle, sensing if one still has an active mobile or cordless phone or not. James Wesley Rawles suggested this possibility in his book How to Survive The End of the World as we Know it (I think the Crew discussed this book at one point during one of their shows?). This is what he says:

Yes, it does. Although if you just want to do that to your phone alone for that purpose, there are small Faraday type sleeves out there which would do the job as well.
 
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Cosmos

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I haven't bought this, but it looks like it might have some useful ideas
.

I just had a rough look at it, and I'm impressed! From that short glance it looks really good to me. Quite smart and ingenious ideas right there. Knowledge and ideas you hopefully never need but could come in quite handy in emergency type situations. So, I would say that the price is more than reasonable for what you get.
 

JGeropoulas

The Living Force
I just had a rough look at it, and I'm impressed! From that short glance it looks really good to me. Quite smart and ingenious ideas right there. Knowledge and ideas you hopefully never need but could come in quite handy in emergency type situations. So, I would say that the price is more than reasonable for what you get.
I decided to buy it and in the course of checking out, they make 2 good additional offers: 16 topical books including those on maintaining communication and one on building a generator/battery system for a fraction of the cost of ready-made units ($65); and 16 topical books from the "Ancient Ways" series, including those on medicinal plants, edible plants and maintaining high energy ($70)
 
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