Emergency Power Generation/Storage, EMP Protection, Heating/Cooling, Handy Tools and Tricks

Cosmos

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Now it starts to get a bit more interesting/workable in terms of OFF Grid usage in short and even long term:

Section 2= Low-Cost to medium-Cost setup options without EMP protection.

Option 1:
  • One "EcoFlow RIVER Portable Power Station 288Wh" (EU and International Version available) [$349.00]
  • One cheaper Solar blanket/case/suitcase/panel for charging the EcoFlow with up to 200W or a bit more. Although I wouldn't recommend buying any other solar options than the ones offered by OFF Grid Trek, there are a myriad of much less expensive options out there with which you can also max out the "200W 10-25V DC 12A max" requirements of the EcoFlow Generator/-s. So I would really only recommend this if you really can't afford the more expensive OFF Grid Trek Solar options. I won't recommend any specific option here (and thus can't provide a price), so, do some research what solar panels would fit that bill and preferably make sure that following criteria are met: 1 = A clear/reliable/provable statement of the efficiency of the solar cells/system (usually the higher, the better, but be aware that many providers can't be relied upon in regard to their truthfulness. For example; some might state "up to 23% efficiency" while in reality the blanket has only 9% or less efficiency and is practically useless!), 2 = The solar option should be able to function if parts of the cells are shadowed or broken and/or the panel needs to function under lower light conditions (be aware that many cheap ones out there can't do that), 3 = The solar option should be at least water-resistant, preferably though waterproof (be aware that I have found practically 0 blankets or cases that are waterproof except for the great Off Grid Trek solar options. If you are lucky you can find water-resistant ones which is something different! But chunky, big and heavy solar panels designed for houses usually are waterproof!), 4= The solar option should be sturdy and designed so that the cells can't break and go Kaputt easily when operated or handled (be aware that most if not all solar blankets/cases don't fulfill that criteria, except for the great Off Grid Trek ones. But chunky, big and heavy solar panels designed for houses usually do!).

Option 2:

Option 3:

Option 4:
Section 2.2= Low-Cost to medium-Cost setup options with EMP protection.

Either one of the options mentioned above in Section 2 (1-4) with the addition of one EMP proof Faraday Bag from OFF GRID Trek respectively: "OGT Large Faraday Bag 126L, Room for all of your Electronics" [$369.99].

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Notes:

Note that while you can theoretically heat and cook with all options in section 2 (Option 1-4) - in addition to generating power ability - I wouldn't recommend using options 1 and 4 for heating/cooking if you can get Option 2 in Section 2, or much better, Option 3 in Section 2. It isn't very economic/power saving at all to do it with Options 1 and 4 in section 2. The same applies for Options 2 -6 in Section 1 while there is no possibility to do so with Option 1 in Section 1. See my first post for more information why this is the case: in summary; because you should use some kind of fossil fuel or flame burning (with wood for example) to do that, if you can.

Note that Option 3 in Section 2 is by far the best option if you want to heat/cook as well while you can certainly also do that with Option 2 in Section 2, although less effectively since you should/could do it with detours: You can heat/cook by directly plugging into the Petrol Generator and then use an electric heater or stove via the AC plug; Quite some energy loss and noise. Note that ONLY Option 1 and Option 4 in Section 2 really fulfill the "energy independents or renewable" criteria in an OFF Grid situation when you don't have any fossil fuels or wood left: but only if you can catch more or less good sunshine! If there is really bad weather (lots of thick clouds with almost none to no sunshine coming through) for longer times, that won't help much for Option 1 and Option 4 in Section 2, most especially in terms of heating/cooling/cooking and generally operating things with a lot of power draws. Also note that in Option 4 in Section 2 we are not using the full sunlight potential (as previously mentioned, the Ecoflow Generators have a "200W 10-25V DC 12A max" input for solar), while we can do that with Option 1 in Section 1. Later on for a higher price, that will be possible with good solar blankets from "Off Grid Trek". Also note that with no option in Section 1 or Section 2, we, as yet, have a fallback/security mechanism like the following: "if there is no fossil fuel left, I can still power with solar if I'm lucky", or the reverse, "if there is no sunshine, I can still power with my fossil fuel savings", or if you run out of Petrol that you can still use Propane, or in the reverse, if there is no Propane left that you can still use Petrol. Those fallback/security mechanisms will start to come into play for higher prices in the next section 3: Medium-Cost to high-cost setup options with or without EMP protection.

Stay tuned.

Additional note added later:

If you are on tight budget you could of course ditch the Ecoflow Generators in Option 2 and 3 in Section 2 and just use the Petrol or Propane generator respectively for each option (thus without any means of storing the energy) although I wouldn’t recommend that. Therefore it would be 349$ less in either of those two options.
 
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Tauriel

Jedi Council Member
For those living in Europe there are very good dual generators which can operate with LPG gas or gasoline.
Gas is much easier and longer to store than gasoline. They also provide inverter technology so that you may charge sensitive appliances like a smartphone, laptop etc..
It's a German company:
 

dredger

The Living Force
We regularly discussed the topic of power generating devices with my cousin and a friend who deposited a patent 3y before on a steerling-type engine/oven that produces +/- 1kw and who is at this moment working on a new patent.

One of the topic was about hydrogen, and the fact that it requires more energy to produce hydrogen from water than the energy you get back by burning it. And about that, my cousin told me that a long time ago, early 2000, he saw a video that he was never able to find back, where a guy demonstrated the possibility to produce hydrogen from water using a very low voltage (or a low energy input) when combining this with a specific device that sends a precise frequency (wavelenght) in the water. He (my cousin) explained that the factor of energy required was diminished incredibly (more than 100x less energy required) at a specific frequency.

Of course, this video could be one (of the first) hoax of internet, but I would tend to think that there's something to discover, or re-discover around this topic. I do not have the knowledge to conduct such experiments, but if one here has it and requires a financial help to buy specific devices to conduct the tests (and also has the time to), I can help on the financial side, or this could even be a project in which i could invest using my company's assets. (note that this is concerning here just this sub-topic of producing hydrogen from water, but it could be any other "promising" topic surrounding the main idea of energetic autonomy)

May i ask the following to the "tech" people among FOTCM : do you have specific research projects on such "energy" topics that you conduct together ? (that could then give me a good further reason to join FOTCM, i won't explain here why i did not yet applied)

And a more general question, which seems logical to ask : is it worth it to spend one's time & energy on such researches now ? I mean, from the latest conversations/transcriptions with C's, are we near the 3D to 4D passage ? If it's "soon", best then is to do with what we have and stop searching on innovations (generally spoken) - this is what i'm wondering. I would say it's a good question, to determine the time when it's over to make researches but time to prepare oneself with what we have/know/gathered.
 

Kari Baba

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
I have a question and I hope that one of you will have an idea about it. The following: I have an open fireplace. Such a fireplace is primarily intended for a nice ambience with an open fire. But not for heat storage. The fireplace itself was built in the 1970s, as was the house. We ourselves live in this house for rent. Well, as part of my preparations, I naturally thought about how I could use this fireplace as a real source of heat. At the moment I can of course burn firewood or briquettes there and have an alternative hob with a grill. But really storing heat doesn't work. I have 2 pictures here so that you can get an idea of my fireplace. He is not small. The chimney flue is on the left.

IMG_9328.jpg

I could have a fireplace retrofitted, but that's expensive and as I said, we rent a place. So I thought about putting heat-retaining stones on the right side. So just stack it up? It doesn't make sense on the left side because I'm afraid that it will hamper the trigger. Which stones could I use? Soapstone, or Simple Bricks? Which stone stores the most heat? If anyone has any experience here, I would be deeply grateful!
 

Tauriel

Jedi Council Member
So I thought about putting heat-retaining stones on the right side. So just stack it up? It doesn't make sense on the left side because I'm afraid that it will hamper the trigger. Which stones could I use?
If you're planning to line the walls I'd suggest fire bricks. Soapstone is usually used as an outer shell, not an inner shell. It would dry and crack.
And I would line all walls for better effect and distribution of heat.
But honestly I doubt that you will gain much from it. It remains an open fireplace with no option to put a door there since it was not build for such resulting heat.

Did you consider to use it just as a chimney for a woodstove? The stove would be yours and you could get one made from soapstone with cooking plates and a hot water reservoir.
 

Kari Baba

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
As I said, I live for rent. And I just wanted a little extra way to store heat. My landlord is pretty stingy when it comes to renovations, etc. So I'm on my own. And I'm just trying to prepare as best I can under the circumstances. A use for the fireplace is unfortunately out of the question for me for reasons of cost. Hence the question about stones that store heat; I would just stack them on the right side. Or is that nonsensical?
 

Tauriel

Jedi Council Member
For just a bit of extra heat I still suggest fire bricks.
You should leave some free space to the opening to protect the wooden rack.
If you line all three walls it should enhance heat storage when you use good fire bricks.
At least that's what I would try although my experience is limited to woodstoves.
 

Inquorate

Jedi Master
We regularly discussed the topic of power generating devices with my cousin and a friend who deposited a patent 3y before on a steerling-type engine/oven that produces +/- 1kw and who is at this moment working on a new patent.

One of the topic was about hydrogen, and the fact that it requires more energy to produce hydrogen from water than the energy you get back by burning it. And about that, my cousin told me that a long time ago, early 2000, he saw a video that he was never able to find back, where a guy demonstrated the possibility to produce hydrogen from water using a very low voltage (or a low energy input) when combining this with a specific device that sends a precise frequency (wavelenght) in the water. He (my cousin) explained that the factor of energy required was diminished incredibly (more than 100x less energy required) at a specific frequency.

Of course, this video could be one (of the first) hoax of internet, but I would tend to think that there's something to discover, or re-discover around this topic. I do not have the knowledge to conduct such experiments, but if one here has it and requires a financial help to buy specific devices to conduct the tests (and also has the time to), I can help on the financial side, or this could even be a project in which i could invest using my company's assets. (note that this is concerning here just this sub-topic of producing hydrogen from water, but it could be any other "promising" topic surrounding the main idea of energetic autonomy)

May i ask the following to the "tech" people among FOTCM : do you have specific research projects on such "energy" topics that you conduct together ? (that could then give me a good further reason to join FOTCM, i won't explain here why i did not yet applied)

And a more general question, which seems logical to ask : is it worth it to spend one's time & energy on such researches now ? I mean, from the latest conversations/transcriptions with C's, are we near the 3D to 4D passage ? If it's "soon", best then is to do with what we have and stop searching on innovations (generally spoken) - this is what i'm wondering. I would say it's a good question, to determine the time when it's over to make researches but time to prepare oneself with what we have/know/gathered.
I believe that was Sterling, an Australian inventor. And I also believe that the "correct frequency" would have been the result of a specifically shaped and sized chamber.

I believe that based on my own research and interactions with Dr Ronald Stiffer, now deceased. I have gone to study electromagnetics at uni on the back of my understanding about vibration, and atomic resonance. Experiments continue, but using the principles derived from those experiments, I have been able to measure milliwatts, of power from a poorly made system. I believe the power comes from the vibrating atoms, the "wheelworks of nature" or in a more mundane sense; heat.

Exams on Monday and Tuesday, then in the summer break I will learn Python programming so I can finish my fourth version of a calorimeter, and work more on my paper on solenoid resonance.

So, it is possible to do. But it takes years of study and experiment to refine. If you decide to start your journey, look up Dr Stiffler's hydrogen experiments.. he used broadband RF but I believe he proved gain there too.

More discussion on this topic would probably be better taken here


Or to another thread, so as not to sidetrack this one.

Regards,
Ben
 

Cosmos

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
As I said, I live for rent. And I just wanted a little extra way to store heat. My landlord is pretty stingy when it comes to renovations, etc. So I'm on my own. And I'm just trying to prepare as best I can under the circumstances. A use for the fireplace is unfortunately out of the question for me for reasons of cost. Hence the question about stones that store heat; I would just stack them on the right side. Or is that nonsensical?

First off: you can be very lucky to have a fireplace! Big advantage in bad times... In regards to your question: I‘m no expert but thinking it through maybe something like you suggested above might help a bit, but I‘m not sure how much. I would say not much.

I just searched on google and a so called „Fireback“ might be exactly what you are looking for! I guess you could redirect a lot more heat from the fireplace with a fireback into the room. If I were you I would research the fireback idea thoroughly and then I would try to build/buy the best and most effective solution for your fireplace. Looks like your fireplace doesn’t have a fireback and the way it is constructed might provide a pretty good/effective way for a fitting fireback to radiate quite some heat into the room…



Thinking about it a bit more: I guess you could even relatively easily/effectively/cheaply substantially improve the fireback by putting it on all 4 sides relatively tightly BUT WITH THE ADDITION of a heat retaining layer behind it with a material that stores heat well and for long times (like certain types of stones maybe?)!! My guess is that you could quite easily improve the effectiveness of your fireplace in that way since you are essentially creating a fire fueled heat radiator/storage that could radiate quite some heat into the room for a certain time, even after the fire has died! If I were you, I would start researching heat retaining materials and what would be the most effective solution. I don’t think that idea will cost much, nor that the installment would be complicated. I also think you could do it easily in a way that you can set it up and dismantle it without any permanent change to the Fireplace itself.
 
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Cosmos

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
I just added the following note into the post for Section 2 above:

Additional note added later:

If you are on tight budget you could of course ditch the Ecoflow Generators in Option 2 and 3 in Section 2 and just use the Petrol or Propane generator respectively for each option (thus without any means of storing the energy) although I wouldn’t recommend that. Therefore it would be 349$ less in either of those two options.
 

Cosmos

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
For those living in Europe there are very good dual generators which can operate with LPG gas or gasoline.
Gas is much easier and longer to store than gasoline. They also provide inverter technology so that you may charge sensitive appliances like a smartphone, laptop etc..
It's a German company:

Good call! I also came across those specific generators while I did my research quite a while ago for our setup. In fact I think I would have chosen one from that company, but, if I remember correctly, I chose the above described "Champion 2000 Watt LPG Dual Fuel Inverter Generator" instead for some of the following reasons: ease of operation, noise level when operating, handy indicators built into the generator and because I couldn‘t find many reviews in written form or on video about the reliability of the machine and to see how the Generator is operating. Could be that there were some additional things I found better on the Champion Generator as well (and forgot to mention here), that I would need to look up/research again.

Having said that, I think you can‘t do much wrong with choosing said German brand instead of the Champion Generator. It also looks like there is a smaller one from that company that is cheaper than the Champion, so I will probably include that option in the next section. Thanks!

And yes, as you rightly have pointed out, LPG/Propane Gas has quite a number of valuable/cool benefits, that’s why it ended up as such an essential part of our setup (after lot’s of research!)! That’s also why I present it in the mentioned and upcoming Sections for cheaper (stripped down) version of our setup.
 
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dredger

The Living Force
I believe that was Sterling, an Australian inventor. And I also believe that the "correct frequency" would have been the result of a specifically shaped and sized chamber.
Thanks for your answer, and the link to the other thread. I'll pass these information to my friend inventor, but he may lacks the required knowledge surrounding the topic (frequency, vibration, resonance, EMF or PEMF, etc...) ? I do not know, it's planned to discuss between 4 of us (with a 3rd friend) before end of this month. From what i understood it seems that this would require a multidisciplinary team work, (this remains me the C's recommending to network), and this remains one "idea" among many. But as i wrote above, due to actual "worlwide" context, the big question of "is it worth it nowodays to spend one energy/time on such (kind of) researches when you see how the world is going on ?" is good to be asked. If I have news i'll answer on the other thread as yes, it's a bit off-topic. Thanks again, and as we like to say in french "he who lives will see (french :"qui vivra verra") :)
 

Tauriel

Jedi Council Member
Good call! I also came across those specific generators while I did my research quite a while ago for our setup
I chose this one:
Gasoline generators KS 3000G to buy | Könner & Söhnen

No matter which model, the advantages of gas go beyond storage advantages. The noise level is much lower than with gasoline, also the exhaust gases.
The generator itself has a nice size and can be moved easily.

I cook with gas for many years and always use gas bottles for sovereignty.
So I figured I'd just store up some more.
 

Woodsman

The Living Force
I have a question and I hope that one of you will have an idea about it. The following: I have an open fireplace. Such a fireplace is primarily intended for a nice ambience with an open fire. But not for heat storage. The fireplace itself was built in the 1970s, as was the house. We ourselves live in this house for rent. Well, as part of my preparations, I naturally thought about how I could use this fireplace as a real source of heat. At the moment I can of course burn firewood or briquettes there and have an alternative hob with a grill. But really storing heat doesn't work. I have 2 pictures here so that you can get an idea of my fireplace. He is not small. The chimney flue is on the left.

View attachment 51215

I could have a fireplace retrofitted, but that's expensive and as I said, we rent a place. So I thought about putting heat-retaining stones on the right side. So just stack it up? It doesn't make sense on the left side because I'm afraid that it will hamper the trigger. Which stones could I use? Soapstone, or Simple Bricks? Which stone stores the most heat? If anyone has any experience here, I would be deeply grateful!

One thing to bear in mind with fireplaces in the home is that chimneys need attention. Low heat fires in particular cause creosote buildup, and that can catch fire; chimney fires are not something to take lightly. "Chimney Sweep" is still a respected and necessary profession. People who use woodstoves as a primary heat source in their houses need yearly cleanings to stay safe. If that falls to your landlord, it might not be a doable thing.

I like the idea of using one of those small camping wood stoves in the fireplace and sending the smoke from it up the chimney. In a pinch, it might provide a nice heat option; something you can keep in a closet along with a bag or two of pre-cut kindling (regular wood cut into small slats for starting regular fires) and pull out if things get desperate.

For cooking, I like the idea of propane. Those big standard barbecue tanks are something you can store for emergencies. Though, if there are supply chain issues, it's not something you can count on always being available.

For my part, I like the idea of using the human body as a natural furnace; you wear layers and eat fatty food and put a tent inside a room. That'll keep you warm on one of those ultra-cold nights when the power is out.

Thick blankets and maybe a hot-water bottle for bed and keeping one room in mind which you can heat up easily and quickly for emergencies. I've spent numerous winters keeping the temperature just high enough to stop pipes from bursting, and wearing layers and sometimes a winter hat indoors, and doing spot-heating, (a small, 1x3' electric rug under my work desk where my feet are.) -This was not about survival, but rather about saving money; electric heating added about $2000 per winter to my electricity bill. I cut that way down through these measures. -And the body gets used to it! After about two weeks of being really miserable, and having to retreat to the washroom and run a hot shower just to stop from shivering, suddenly, heating my body with bacon started working and it was really nice. I felt sharp and healthy, and the funny part: when I'd go out to other people's houses or to stop at the local cafe, it was like entering a jungle! "Whew! It's like an oven in here! Can we turn the heat down?" I'd only say that to myself, of course, but I started being amazed at a society which felt it was normal to expect to be able to wear tee shirts through the cold months.

Another thing to keep in mind...

If you do pressure cooking, then you can eat the product cold, so there's no need for cooking after storage. You can just eat from the jar. (Though, there are a few batches I have which are a couple of years old now, and I'd want to cook again after opening just to be on the safe side.)

I also found that one of the things which really got me feeling cold was basic inactivity, sitting and working for hours at a time. The cold would get into my bones. -One time I thought, "This is stupid!" and on a whim I got up and did a bunch of jumping jacks in my living room. Wow! That sure worked. I was sweating and hot in no time. "Why didn't I think of this before? Duh."

I'll tell you this: I sure do appreciate Spring and Summer in a way I never did before!
 
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