Dyatlov Pass incident

IMAnonymous

A Disturbance in the Force
Olesya said:
Later, he talks about the fact that Kholat Syakhl is a prominent magnetic anomaly zone. This was first pointed out by the investigator, E.V. Buayanov from St.Petersburg, who visited a place of the tragedy and discovered that the needle of the compass points out not to the North magnetic pole, but deviates to the west to 31 degrees. Then, he says that considering that for the Ivdel region the magnetic deviation accepted as pointing to the east and equal to 17 degrees 50' that means that this magnetic anomaly changes the compass readings as almost as 50 degrees (31°+17°50'=48°50') and this is a lot.

I looked this up and could find no mention of this magnetic anomaly. The skiers had to be using a compass in the overcast of the last day and their compass course was "dead on".
 

IMAnonymous

A Disturbance in the Force
Laura said:
From Wikipedia:


Avalanche damage is considered a possible explanation for this incident.[8] One scenario under this theory is that moving snow knocked down the tent, ruining the campsite in the night.

Correction: No moving snow knocked anything down. All inputted skis and ski poles were in place.


The party then cut themselves free and mobilized. The snow would likely have contacted them and possibly ruined their boots and extra clothing.

The party "cut themselves free" from right next to the open and still standing tent entrance.

Their boots were valenkis and galoshes. Snow has no impact on either. Likewise, snow had no impact on their pants, ski coats, and fur coats. Finally, snow can be shaken off any clothing.

Being covered in wet snow in the sub-freezing temperatures created a serious hazard to survival, with possible exhaustion or unconsciousness from hypothermia possible in under 15 minutes.[9]

There is no such thing as "wet subfreezing snow".



Thibeaux-Brignolles, Dubunina, Zolotariov, and Kolevatov were moving farther from the site to find help despite their remote location

They were headed in the wrong direction to find help.

They were actually building a snow den in the ravine.

Supporting factors for this theory are that avalanches are not uncommon on any slope that can accumulate snow.

The area is described as a "weak" avalanche area. No avalanche has ever been recorded here.


Despite claims that the area is not prone to avalanches,[10] slab avalanches do typically occur in new snow and where people are disrupting the snowpack.[11] On the night of the incident, snow was falling, the campsite was situated on a slope, and the campers were disrupting the stability of the snowpack. The tent was also halfway torn down and partially covered with snow - all of which could support the theory of a small avalanche pushing snow into the tent.

The tent was "halfway torn down" because the north and east rope stretching had come undone. It had nothing to do with an avalanche.

There is no evidence the campers were "disrupting the snowpack" as there was no evidence of disrupted snow. The tent was in virtually the exact same depth of snow when found as when put up.



Released documents contained no information about the condition of the skiers’ internal organs.

Broken ribs are covered.
 

IMAnonymous

A Disturbance in the Force
happyliza said:
But the mystery would not go away. The ingredients were too potent.

Now the riddle has been revisited in a new book by British writer and researcher Keith McCloskey. It is also the subject of a gripping new film — released this weekend — by Hollywood director Renny Harlin, a veteran of mystery, thriller and horror movies.

‘There is no theory that makes sense,’ says Harlin, ‘only guesses.’ And he’s right. The explanations put forward over the years for what made the Dyatlov Nine flee mindlessly from the relative haven of their tent to die in the snow range from the obvious to the bizarre and then to the insane, with large doses of conspiracy theory along the way.

There is the sexual explanation, for example — did a massive drunken punch-up break out among the men, possibly over advances made to the alluring Zina Kolmogorova? But while human nature is always suspect in the claustrophobic conditions of a tent on a blizzard-swept mountainside, that doesn’t explain why they fled en masse into the night.

Wild bears on the prowl for prey are another proposition — but no animal tracks were found.

An avalanche might have been enough for them to lose their nerve and run. Perhaps, in confusion, they raced away from the immediate danger but then could not find their way back in the pitch black of the night and against Arctic winds.

Yet there was no sign of snow pouring over the tent, which was still largely upright when found. And these were experienced adult hikers, not likely to be easily scared. At least one of them surely would have kept calm enough not to join the lemming rush to their doom?

Were they, perhaps, caught up in some bizarre military accident in the lonely (and top secret) vastness of the Russian interior — a missile misfiring or a low-flying jet sending out shock waves and noise that frightened them out of their wits?

This was the height of the Cold War with both sides of the East-West divide searching for the ultimate weapon to knock the other out. But there is no evidence of experimental weapons sites within hundreds of miles.

There has been speculation about the development of ultra-sonic weapons that destroy with sound alone, but no proof that such arms even exist.

What is known is that nearby the Mountain of the Dead were gulag camps for those unfortunates who crossed the Communist leadership in Moscow. Could a bunch of desperate escapees have pounced on the unsuspecting hikers and slaughtered them?
Experienced skiers: Yuri Yudin hugging Lyudmila Dubinina as he prepares to leave the group due to illness, which saved his life as he left the expedition before the deaths

Experienced skiers: Yuri Yudin hugging Lyudmila Dubinina as he prepares to leave the group due to illness, which saved his life as he left the expedition before the deaths

Or were the campers — as another unprovable theory suggests — collateral damage after a mass escape of criminal thugs from one camp in the area?

This was supposedly foiled by the KGB using missiles loaded with nerve gas or vacuum bombs that sucked the oxygen from the air — perhaps explaining the internal injuries some of the hikers suffered.

But there were no other footprints in the snow around the site suggesting more people were involved — which also rules out suggestions that the Nine stumbled on Soviet Spetznaz special forces testing secret weapons and were eliminated on the spot to shut them up.

Conspiracy theories are two-a-kopek. While sceptics might dismiss the Soviet investigator’s talk of aliens, believers are encouraged by reports of strange lights and ‘bright orbs’ hovering in the night sky at around this time.

The last photograph on the film in one of the cameras found in the tent appears to capture a giant flash against the night sky — but it could equally be the result of an accidental over-exposure.

Then we must consider (but quickly pass over) the possibility of wandering yetis or abominable snowmen pouncing on the hapless hikers and squeezing the life out of the victims with those massive internal injuries.

A centuries-old horror legend in the Urals speaks of a fearsome zolotaya baba — a ‘golden woman’ — lurking in the area.

But the simple fact is no theory holds up to scrutiny. As Keith McCloskey concludes, we will probably never know for sure what actually happened on that remote mountainside.

The one thing he feels sure about is that there was some sort of an official cover-up, which has served only to add to the mystery. But the Soviet Union was a place where concealing the truth was second nature to officials, high and low.

Accidents were routinely airbrushed from the record. Twenty years after the Dyatlov incident, a fatal release of anthrax from a germ warfare research establishment in the Urals was hushed up. The KGB seized all hospital records and, to this day, the site is off-limits.

McCloskey blames the deaths of the Dyatlov Nine on some unspecified accident caused by the Soviet military, but precisely what and where and how eludes him and us.

Harlin’s provocative film, on the other hand, provides an answer.

The most current offered explanation, including actual supporting evidence and absent fantasies, can be found on Amazon's Kindle books for only 99 cents. It's "A Compelling Unknown Force" by Clark Wilkins.
 

Nienna

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Hello IMAnonymous and welcome to the forum.

Please introduce yourself in the Newbies Section. Just a little bit about yourself, nothing personal, and tell us how you found the forum. If you are unsure what to post, just take a look at what others on that board have posted.
 

Elohir

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Re: Аbout DYATLOV PASS incident

I Thank you because I didn't know this weird event.
I have just made some resaerches about it and it's quite interesting. Soviet secret experiment, UFO's activity, Yeti, Time portals... Various explanations are possible and it could be very interesting to finally discover the turth about this event.
 

Medulin

Jedi
A very similar incident happened in Northern Brazil, and was investigated by Bob Pratt:
_http://sigsno.org/data/20130331105222/crabisland.html
 

Cleo

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Re: Аbout DYATLOV PASS incident

Hi, this thread is over a year old now, but isn't there a C's session that discusses the Dyatlov Pass incident from either late last year or this year? I've been using different keywords to search for the session but haven't come up with anything. I could have possibly read of something similar in a session and then mistaken it for this incident. Thought I'd check though in the chance that it was discussed.
 

Keit

Ambassador
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Re: Аbout DYATLOV PASS incident

Cleo said:
Hi, this thread is over a year old now, but isn't there a C's session that discusses the Dyatlov Pass incident from either late last year or this year? I've been using different keywords to search for the session but haven't come up with anything. I could have possibly read of something similar in a session and then mistaken it for this incident. Thought I'd check though in the chance that it was discussed.

Well, the link to the thread mentioned in the first post contains a very interesting conversation and theories about it. Maybe this is what you saw?

In any case, there is a new mystery now. A group of tourists found a body of 50 years old male in the location of Dyatlov Pass. But now they disappeared themselves. Meaning, that due to very harsh weather conditions in the area it isn't possible to establish any communication with them or to send a recovery team for the body. The group supposed to arrive to the final destination on 18th of January. Hopefully they are well and sound.

Here's a link in Russian.
 

Laura

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Re: Аbout DYATLOV PASS incident

https://www.rt.com/news/328454-body-found-dyatlov-pass/

A body has been discovered by tourists at the infamous Dyatlov Pass in Russia’s Ural Mountains where nine hikers mysteriously died in 1959. Emergency services have reportedly momentarily lost contact with the group.

An unidentified body has been discovered by tourist-hikers at the infamous Dyatlov pass in Sverdlovskaya region, according to local security officials. A group of nine tourists reportedly from Perm contacted emergency services overnight on Friday.

Following a message from the group via satellite phone officials lost contact with the hikers, reported V-kurse.ru. Due to bad weather conditions emergency groups are unable to reach the barely-accessible site where the body was found. Some reports suggest that it is a male of about 50 years old.

The travelers began their journey on January 1 trekking along one of the most difficult paths starting from North Ural to the town of Ivdel, according to the emergency services.

The site where body was reportedly located is infamous for the tragic and mysterious deaths of nine hikers in 1959. The causes of their deaths are still unknown while the case is surrounded with controversy.

The Dyatlov pass was named after the leader of the hiking group that went missing, Igor Dyatlov. The group consisted of graduate students from of the Ural Polytechnic Institute. Their plan was to trek 350 kilometers on skis through the forests and Northern Urals to Mount Otorten (which is translated from the local Mansi language as ‘Don’t go There’). Initially there were 10 people in the group, but one of the hikers fell ill and was forced to abandon the venture.

On February 12, 1959 the nine failed to report to the scheduled end-point at a village called Vizhay. As a result of rescue efforts, the group’s tent was found on the slope of the Mount Kholat Syakhl (“Mountain of the Dead” in Mansi) on February 26. Investigators later determined that tent had been was cut with a sharp object from the inside.

The skiers also left all their belongings in the tent while apparently trying to urgently flee the campsite. After following footprints down the hill for about 1.5 km – some of those fleeing were wearing only socks, some were even barefoot – the search party found five bodies.

Some of the hikers were wearing only underwear and their bodies showed signs of struggle such as fractured skulls and broken ribs. One of the women had her tongue missing. The search for the remaining four travelers who were located further into the woods took more than two months.

The Soviet criminal investigation in 1959 failed to establish the causes of the incident. The final report said that an "unknown compelling force" killed the people.

The incident which remains one of the most chilling unsolved mysteries of the 20th century sparked many theories in which investigators attempted to rebuild the chronology of events. The numerous explanations put forward included an avalanche, military tests seen by the hikers that the government was trying to hide, a hostile encounter with an unknown creature, or paranormal activity.

The mystery of the Dyatlov Pass incident has inspired filmmakers to make a science fiction horror movie entitled ‘Devil’s Pass’ where five students investigate the incident.
 

Niall

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Re: Аbout DYATLOV PASS incident

Laura said:
https://www.rt.com/news/328454-body-found-dyatlov-pass/

A body has been discovered by tourists at the infamous Dyatlov Pass in Russia’s Ural Mountains where nine hikers mysteriously died in 1959. Emergency services have reportedly momentarily lost contact with the group.

An unidentified body has been discovered by tourist-hikers at the infamous Dyatlov pass in Sverdlovskaya region, according to local security officials. A group of nine tourists reportedly from Perm contacted emergency services overnight on Friday.

Following a message from the group via satellite phone officials lost contact with the hikers, reported V-kurse.ru. Due to bad weather conditions emergency groups are unable to reach the barely-accessible site where the body was found. Some reports suggest that it is a male of about 50 years old.

The travelers began their journey on January 1 trekking along one of the most difficult paths starting from North Ural to the town of Ivdel, according to the emergency services.

:shock:

ANOTHER group of 9 hikers??
 

seek10

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Re: Аbout DYATLOV PASS incident

Laura said:
https://www.rt.com/news/328454-body-found-dyatlov-pass/
The skiers also left all their belongings in the tent while apparently trying to urgently flee the campsite. After following footprints down the hill for about 1.5 km – some of those fleeing were wearing only socks, some were even barefoot – the search party found five bodies.

Some of the hikers were wearing only underwear and their bodies showed signs of struggle such as fractured skulls and broken ribs. One of the women had her tongue missing. The search for the remaining four travelers who were located further into the woods took more than two months.

The Soviet criminal investigation in 1959 failed to establish the causes of the incident. The final report said that an "unknown compelling force" killed the people.

The incident which remains one of the most chilling unsolved mysteries of the 20th century sparked many theories in which investigators attempted to rebuild the chronology of events. The numerous explanations put forward included an avalanche, military tests seen by the hikers that the government was trying to hide, a hostile encounter with an unknown creature, or paranormal activity.

The mystery of the Dyatlov Pass incident has inspired filmmakers to make a science fiction horror movie entitled ‘Devil’s Pass’ where five students investigate the incident.
Looks like another "missing 411" incident/s.
 

Gaby

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Re: Аbout DYATLOV PASS incident

More details of the 1959 case here:

http://www.sott.net/article/258475-Russias-Dyatlov-Pass-incident-the-strangest-unsolved-mystery-of-the-last-century

It gets weirder. The final four were better outfitted than the other five, and apparently had taken clothes off the dead as they continued their aimless trek. Zolotariov, for example, was found wearing Dubinina's coat and hat, while she in turn had wrapped around her foot a piece of the wool pants that one of the two found at the pine tree had been wearing. To add to the mystery, the clothes found on the final group were tested and found to be radioactive.

Documents related to the case were sealed after it was closed, and weren't opened until sometime in the 1990s. I've been interested in the case for awhile now and have tried to dig up new info, but my FOIA requests to the various US intelligence agencies have all turned up bupkis. The cause of the incident is still speculative, but interviews given by the lead investigator, Lev Ivanov, around the time the records were unsealed shine light on just how strange the case is.

Ivanov was the one who first noticed that the bodies and gear found were all radioactive, and said that a Geiger counter he'd brought with him went nuts all around the campsite. He also has said that Soviet officials told him at the time to clamp the case shut, despite reports that "bright flying spheres" had been reported in the area in February and March of 1959.

"I suspected at the time and am almost sure now that these bright flying spheres had a direct connection to the group's death," Ivanov told Kazakh newspaper Leninsky Put in an interview dug up by the Times.

Another group of students camped out around 30 miles from the other group reported similar sightings at that time. In written testimony, one said that he saw "a shining circular body fly over the village from the south-west to the north-east. The shining disc was practically the size of a full moon, a blue-white light surrounded by a blue halo. The halo brightly flashed like the flashes of distant lightning. When the body disappeared behind the horizon, the sky lit up in that place for a few more minutes."

The leading theory, considering the secrecy, radioactivity, and the appearance of some of the bodies, which were reported as being "deeply tanned" by a young boy attending some of their funerals, is that the group somehow came across a Soviet military testing ground. But, assuming reports are true, what caused the trauma to some members of the group is unknown.

It's possible that one of the members saw some crazy light in the sky and everyone freaked out, running for their lives, but there has never been evidence of an explosion in the area, ruling out some sort of nuclear test or something of the like. But even so, that doesn't explain the skull fractures. Some could be explained by a fall into the ravine, but remember, Slobodin had a fractured skull and was found on his return to the camp.

The fact that remains of a fire were found suggests some members of the group had control of their mental faculties, and psychosis isn't a reported effect of acute exposure to radiation, but that doesn't explain why the group appeared to have run for their lives without bring any of their gear. So was it an accident or a cover-up? Ivanov, the investigator, has since passed away, and unless more military records are discovered and unsealed - which some advocates still call for - the records on hand aren't enough to prove otherwise, and the mystery of what's now known as the Dyatlov Pass is likely to endure.
 

Cleo

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Re: Аbout DYATLOV PASS incident

Keit said:
Cleo said:
Hi, this thread is over a year old now, but isn't there a C's session that discusses the Dyatlov Pass incident from either late last year or this year? I've been using different keywords to search for the session but haven't come up with anything. I could have possibly read of something similar in a session and then mistaken it for this incident. Thought I'd check though in the chance that it was discussed.

Well, the link to the thread mentioned in the first post contains a very interesting conversation and theories about it. Maybe this is what you saw?

In any case, there is a new mystery now. A group of tourists found a body of 50 years old male in the location of Dyatlov Pass. But now they disappeared themselves. Meaning, that due to very harsh weather conditions in the area it isn't possible to establish any communication with them or to send a recovery team for the body. The group supposed to arrive to the final destination on 18th of January. Hopefully they are well and sound.

Here's a link in Russian.

Interesting to read of this recent news, that area and what originally happened there seems all the more odd now..

Also, I was reading this thread around the time I posted the above question, so I think what might've happened is I mixed up whatever I read in one of the sessions for the Dyatlov pass incident. No idea what that might've been though.
 

Laura

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I was sure we asked the Cs about it but I just searched and can't find anything. I reckon this one will be put on the list of questions for the next session! Totally weird.
 
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