Do-it-yourself liposomal nutrients

Cosmos

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Found out quite a bit more now about the topic and planning to post some of the results here.

Homemade "Lipo" tested in the laboratory

So here we go. I finally found someone who alleges that he tried to do the "homemade Lipo", with the usual methods involving normal ultrasonic cleaners and using a host of different methods and ultrasonic intensities and then send them to the laboratory to test the results. His testimony can be found here, but it is in german. Basically he tried a number of solutions, with standard Internet "homemade lipo" protocols and different ultrasonic cleaning machines with varying and increasing watt outputs, all kind of different protocols, and then send it to a lab for analyzing. He says that in the end he invested quite some money and effort and the laboratory results came not even near to Liposomal standards (see above post from me, what sizes and characteristics a Liposome is characteristic of). In the end he says, he could have spared the money and instead bought some from some reliable real Lipo manufactures. He hoped to safe money and produce cheap Lipo at home for his family, since the branded ones are so expensive. As many have done, with the Internet protocols...

So either he is making that up for some nefarious reasons, or as I suspect from my research so far (that confirms his observations), he tells the truth.

Labs where you can test you homeade "Lipo":

Here are two labs that you can send your products to, to test it for Liposomes and other stuff. The last lab I'm not sure about how and if it works there.

A real, "cheap", and good tasting Lipo-Seller with good ingredients:

The first lab has tested a brand I'll bring up next, that I think has by far the best Lipo-solution (that I could find) with concrete data to back it up, that was tested in that first laboratory, and also by the way, independently confirmed by the guy I brought up in the first paragraph above in his testimony. It also has the highest content of Lipo-Vit-C in it on the market while being the most "inexpensive" at the same time.

This Lipo company where I now ordered what I consider most likely real Lipo-C is called LipoLab. You get 500ml of Lipo-Vit-C for 54 € in germany without any additional shipping costs. It seems like the lab is either in germany and/or in the Netherlands. My guess is germany. I received mine in germany pretty quickly, 2,5 days after ordering. In germany, the minimum order quantity is one bottle. For all other countries it seems to be 3 bottles + additional shipping costs, and by that still much cheaper than other brands. I contacted the company to ask for the expiration date of the product unopened and opened. Unopened and cooled in 3-5 degrees Celsius (important!) the bottle can be stored one year! Which is very good. The bottle also has a milliliter cap and is light tight (also important!). Light, warmth and air decays Vit-C quickly. In the case of wrmth, everything above 30 degrees celsius destroys lipsomes. All of this is considered in this product. After opening the bottle it holds at least one month (in 3-5 degrees) before the Liposomes are gone, which is also pretty good. It is also the only company of the few I came up with (and I looked closely at many brands), where there is a good likelihood, that what they sell is actually Lipo-C, and from this small selection, the only one who doesn't use alcohol in the product that is put into a bottle. Also very good IMO. Thea are also planing on a new Lipo-Vit-C product that will be made out of bio acerola cherries. That bottle will cost 70 € though and only has 1/3 of the Vit-C content. They also succeeded to make it taste good (not easy) while not using any bad stuff.

Content: Distilled water, lecithin, ascorbic acid, phosphatidylcholine, stevia, natural flavoring.

15 ml liposomal Vitamin C contain:

  • Vitamin C 3000 mg
  • Phosphatidylcholin 1800 mg
  • Fat 3 g
  • Saturated fats 0 g
  • Energy 27 kcal / 113 kj
Made out of:

- Lecithin from non-GMO sunflowers
- All natural flavoring
- Sugar- and gluten-free
- Without preservatives

Many other products are either questionable or a lot more expensive or have bad stuff in them:

Here are a couple of other producers of Liposomes in the EU listed in a table for comparison, some of which, like Dr. Mercolas, are rather questionable. It is in german and I agree with comment section in the right column about the different brands. There are a number of others too, that sell it but they are either very expensive or have bad stuff in them and more often then not, are rather questionable if you know what criteria to look for to determine the likelihood of it really being Liposomes.

Things to look out for on finding a reliable seller of Lipo-C:

For example: If they promote it as Liposomal and don't show some proof like specific nano sizes and laboratory results, that should be a red flag. Similarly, when they don't get specific what makes their product Liposomal. Also when you read in reviews of people who tested it something like; "I took a dose or more of it and got stomach pain and diarrhea" and when you read in on different platforms, there is a good likelihood that it is not a Liposomal emulsion. Or in the case of Mercolas "Lipo", when it is put into capsules and no cooling is needed that is a big red flag. Another criteria is the amount of Liposomes that are supposed to be in such capsule products like Mercolas, which is impossibly high for such a small milliliter dosis. There are also brands who seriously sell it as hard tablets which is absolutely impossible. Also if they state that their product is "micro" that is a sure sign that it is not Lipo because Lipo is in a nano size between 100 - 500 nanometers with specific characteristics like a double layer. Smaller then that, like under 100 Nanometers, should be fine too I guess, but rather unlikely that the company can sell this for relatively cheap money. Everything larger than 500 nanometers is not Lipsomal. Also if the product doesn't state that it must be cooled or the bottle is not light tight either via a light tight material or a light reducing color, that is also a sign that it might not be Lipo. Or if the company states an impossibly high shelf life as soon as it is opened, even when alcohol is in it, that is also a red flag.

There are a few brands that seem to be sound though, but they don't come even near the cheapness and good overall impression like the one from LipoLab mentioned above. So I don't list them here. If you want to, I can do that though.

Lab-Company that can produce cutting edge specific Lipsomes and properties of thereof on demand, depending on purpose:

The following company provides cutting edge Liposome production on demand for specific purposes and tasks in the body. See my other post above about some of this methods to modulate the Liposomes, also mentioned by Dr. Levy.

Here is the list of what Lipsomes they can produce for what purposes:


I guess those are far more expensive then real normal Lipo products on the market though. They produce it for the medical industry mainly, so it is made on demand and then send out. I guess many of those products are also designed to be directly injected into the blood flow.

Homemade real Lipo should be possible but more expensive (in regards to equipment and producing cost) and more complicated:

Next is how one might be able to produce real Lipo-Vit-C at home according to what I gathered so far, with more costs and efforts involved.

While looking into what people had to say, I also came across this post criticizing the "lab study" that was issued by Livon-Labs that was supposed to disproof that homemade formulas work and that some companies sell their stuff as Lipo while it isn't. After what I gathered I think he makes a couple of good point including about Dr. Levy support of this company. What he misses though is the research into what Liposomes actually are and what is needed to produce them and that it is indeed most likely true that what many sell and produce at home is not Lipo. He goes into an argument about what is an emulsion and what not, while missing the concrete facts of what a Liposome actually is and that according to this criteria, which the lab is referring to I think, those are not Liposome products. I also agree that it is not furthering credibility to not being able to read the study in full.

I agree that Levy would be better of not being an adviser for this company and being more supportive of others, like the one mentioned above, who sell much cheaper and without alcohol and such and openly give guarantees and lab results of their products. He has obviously a bias for Livon Labs, no doubt, but I agree with the poster that it is rather unlikely that he is doing that to mislead people. In short, the poster should educate himself a bit about the topic and then he would see that it is indeed rather unlikely that Liposomes can be produced with cheap equipment at home. He says for example:

Liposomes are actually very easily made by just mere shaking or vortexing! The problem with such simple mechanical energy, the liposomes are quite large. One needs them smaller and an ultrasonic bath will do that job.

Yes, you can create encapsulated Micells with shaking and vortexing for example, as well as with any normal ultrasonic bath, but a Micelle is not a Liposome! Big difference. Just because something is encapsulated, doesn't mean it is a Liposome! You can vortex and shake as long as you want I'm afraid, but you will never get Lipsomes through that process. An emulsion you can produce though, just not a Lipsomal emulsion. With ultrasonic that seems to be different, but you need much more power and very specific parameters like kHz and amplitude, temperatures etc. to achieve that, which is much more expensive. Or at least that is where I'm at at the moment.

I've found a number of professionals on the web, who seem to either in the business and/or biochemistry who all seem to agree that it is a bit more difficult and expensive process that can not be arcieved with those simple equipments at home. Here are a couple of websites I found in which some clear parameters are given that are needed to produce Liposomes. Some of which are the manufacturers you will see later on, of the equipment that is used in laboratories and manufactureres who produce Liposomes.

- Sonication of Biosolids — SONOTRONIC
- Ultrasonic Liposome Preparation
- Ultrasonic Treatment of Nanoparticles for Pharmaceuticals
- Liposomales Vitamin C selber machen / herstellen


You can read through those websites and get a good overview on what is needed and what Lipsomes are. The last link is in german though.

With those data at hand I went out searching for ultrasonic providers who produce the machines for the nanotech industry, including bio-nanotech. Which is the industry who primarily produces Lipsosmomes for genetics, biochemistry and supplement markets. All those different sources (also partly mentioned in the last links above) say similar things about what is needed for producing bio-nano stuff like Liposomes:

- At least 500 Watt (if you want to produce any significant amount) high powered ultrasonic device that must be between 20-21 kHz (apparently 20 kHz is best for that specific purpose) in which temperature can be controlled
- It can be done at lower powers too I think, but you need the right kHz number, amplitudes and such, but you can only produce pretty small amounts. Cooling is very important.
- Cooling
- Specific amplitudes
- the more you want to produce the more power you need and the more cooling
- the power, time, and cooling needed for one batch scales up 10 fold if you increase the volume of the watery material in one batch lets say from 50ml to 500ml. That is if, you do things in one batch. There are solutions from companies that can get around that somewhat, see below
- The high power needed for producing larger amounts, the cooling, equipment, protocols and time needed, are the main reason why real Lipo is not sold very cheaply
- Liposomes get destroyed in temperatures above 30° Celsius
- Similarly, Vit-C starts to decay quickly the warmer it gets, when it is dissolved in water

Companies that sell needed equipment

I found three companies that sell the equipment needed either as full package with cooling and all other parameters included, and/or the different parts that are needed to assempble it.

One company is from Japan, one from the US and another from germany. The german one seems to be the best quality with a lot of parameters already accounted for within the machines.

The three company are:

- https://www.m-technique.co.jp/e/html/shouhin/sub_categoly/batch_renzoku.html
- Ultrasonic Devices for Liquid Processing
- Products | Sonics & Materials, Inc.


As I gathered if you want to produce bigger amounts, lets say to give it to others regularly outside of the family, you probably have to invest around 12.000 - 17.000 Euros in the equipment. If however you only want to produce small amounts fairly quickly, that number could go down significantly, I'm guessing you end up well under 10.000€ then.

The last company above is the only one I could find that sells small ultrasonic equipment for that purpose. It is either this or this ultrasonic device which one can get around 3,500 to 3,100 Dollars. That is without the cooling and such needed though. Theoretically, you could cool such small batches within an ice bath, making sure that the temperature doesn't get to high, and if so, stop, cool it down again, and start again. The german one also sells smaller powered equipment, but it is not in the kHz range needed for Lipsomes. So that is not an option.

The nice thing about the german as well as the US one is, that you can also buy a bit stronger powered equipment like this german one or those two american ones. For both you can buy flow cell reactors with which it is possible to produce about 0.25 and 2.0L/min of the finished product, in the case of the german one for example. The american one also can be used with a flow cell with up to 30L/hour.

The german one is far better though, since it can also cool the material in it at the same time, which is needed for Vit-C/Liposomes. Both, (the german as well as the american one) seem to be able to automatically adjust amplitudes and power outputs depending on the batch size and container etc. Which is very handy, especially if you want to produce larger amounts continuiusly. The two smaller american ultrasonic machines, mentioned in the last paragraph above, also seem to be able to do that.

The beauty of the flow cell reactors is that in the german case it can cool and produce constantly, thereby being able to produce large amounts a day. As for pricing, the american ones are around 5000 US Dollars. For the german one I couldn't find a price, but from what I gathered it should be in the same ballpark, maybe a bit more expensive though.

It seems to me that the german one is the most thought through and realiable for the Lipo production. You can also safe and adjust freely all aparameters for future batches. You can also remote control it vie Lan cable. They also offer to build up your wanted setup in their company in germany for testing and adjusting, with all details needed, from start to finished product, before it is delivered. Which is a huge plus too. So from my side the german one, if one is so inclined to do, is indeed the best one for a setup that can produce larger amounts.

The american provider lacks behind not only in that regard quite a bit to the german equipment. The japanese one on the other hand, sell a complete system, already put together for producing Liposomes, I think. Which also has its plus sides. Although I'm not sure there, since they do not provide specifics like kHz directly on the website.
 

Cosmos

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This Lipo company where I now ordered what I consider most likely real Lipo-C is called LipoLab.

Just made the first experiment on myself and took 60 ml/12 gramm Lipo-C from the above mentioned producer to see how my stomach reacts. Nothing, even after 2 hours. Further indication that the above product is indeed Liposomal. When I did about the same amount with my homemade „Lipo“, shortly afterwards I felt something going on in my stomach and one hour later I had diarrhea.

Edit: 2 hours not 3. Corrected.
 
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Cosmos

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Just made the first experiment on myself and took 60 ml/12 gramm Lipo-C from the above mentioned producer to see how my stomach reacts. Nothing, even after 2 hours. Further indication that the above product is indeed Liposomal. When I did about the same amount with my homemade „Lipo“, shortly afterwards I felt something going on in my stomach and one hour later I had diarrhea.

Edit: 2 hours not 3. Corrected.

Correction: After 2 hours 20 minutes my gut did indeed rebel and I had diarrhea. Quite a lot later as the self made Lipo though. I would say, other than the fact that it felt quite different right after taking it, in the gut area , compared to the self made one (much more reaction there), and that it took more than double as long, this can't count as an indication for anything, since I didn't control other factors/parameters like the time of day when I took it and if the stomach was empty, and how much water I drank afterwards, in both cases. Will try to do that in the future.

I think I have a very low bowl tolerance to Vit-C in general, so I think at least in the case of "Lipolab" the about of 20% of that 12 grams of Vit-C that is not Lipo (above 500 Nanometers) according to their lab results, could be at least theoretically responsible for the delayed response and my bowl reaction. Thus 2-3 gram of non Lipo Vit-C (taken in one go) could be enough in my case to cause a bowl reaction. Need to test that with normal Vit-C dissolved in water.

Edit: I also ate something afterwards (about 2 hours after I took LipoLab) that sometimes causes me to have diarrhea, another factor that might have contributed and makes this experiment not really trustworthy as an indication.
 
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ryu

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I share a receipe I use to make Vit C. In case it can be of use to anyone:




HOME MADE LIPOSOMAL VITAMINE C



Vitamin C, in this case L-ascorbic sodium ascorbate, is encapsulated in microscopic bubbles of phospholipids using an ultrasound generator. These microbeads travel through the digestive tract into the intestines, where vitamin C is released. Vitamin C is therefore not broken down by enzymes and digestive juices in the stomach. In this way, the amount of active vitamin C is multiplied by 10 compared to conventional vitamin C.

Material required :

- 1 ultrasonic cleaner
- 1 mixer
- 3 tablespoons of non-GMO sunflower (or soya) lecithin without hexane
- 1 tablespoon of vitamin C (soluble L-ascorbic acid E300) or sodium ascorbate
- 500 ml of water approximately, as pure as possible

Steps :

-In 240 ml of water, add lecithin. Dissolve it homogeneously, mix the solution for 1 minute. Keep in the fridge for a few hours.

-In 150 to 250 ml of water (depending on the desired dilution), dissolve the vitamin C. Pour the two preparations into the ultrasonic cleaner and vibrate for 25 minutes. Stir from time to time. Pour the solution into a closed glass container.

Can be kept in the refrigerator for up to 10 days. Depending on the dilution, we obtain approximately a preparation of 1.20 g of vitamin C L-ascorbic in 1 tablespoon of approximately 80% encapsulated solution.

Daily dose: As a cure, take 1 tablespoon in the morning on an empty stomach, 15 minutes before a meal, for 3 months. Then take 1 teaspoon daily.
 

D.Leo333

The Force is Strong With This One
So after reading some of the posts, Im a bit confused on if making home made liposomal is even worth it? Pashalis post from 2 years ago, makes me think that its not really worth it or doesnt match up with companies who make real lipsomal. Is it better to just buy it from good sources?
 

nicklebleu

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The issue at hand is that with household equipment you are not really able to make true liposomes - that requires commercial grade equipment and the necessary knowledge and skill.

So instead of investing in some household equipment you might be better off stocking up on a good quality commercial product. You only want to use that as a ‘pharmaceutical’ intervention in a crisis - for maintenance purposes it probably is sufficient to use the normal vitamin C.

Hope that helps!
 

Cosmos

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So after reading some of the posts, Im a bit confused on if making home made liposomal is even worth it? Pashalis post from 2 years ago, makes me think that its not really worth it or doesnt match up with companies who make real lipsomal. Is it better to just buy it from good sources?

If you want to make Lipo Vitamin-C it isn't worth it since you can't do it at home. See above and below for more details. Yes, the only way is to buy it from a good source (mentioned above). And be aware that there are many shady brands out there, as detailed above as well.


Found out quite a bit more now about the topic and planning to post some of the results here. A primer: indeed homemade lipo with those simple/cheap methods doesn’t seem to work. [...]

Yes, you can create encapsulated Micells with shaking and vortexing for example, as well as with any normal ultrasonic bath, but a Micelle is not a Liposome! Big difference. Just because something is encapsulated, doesn't mean it is a Liposome! You can vortex and shake as long as you want I'm afraid, but you will never get Lipsomes through that process. An emulsion you can produce though, just not a Lipsomal emulsion. With ultrasonic that seems to be different, but you need much more power and very specific parameters like kHz and amplitude, temperatures etc. to achieve that, which is much more expensive. Or at least that is where I'm at at the moment.

I've found a number of professionals on the web, who seem to either in the business and/or biochemistry who all seem to agree that it is a bit more difficult and expensive process that can not be arcieved with those simple equipments at home. Here are a couple of websites I found in which some clear parameters are given that are needed to produce Liposomes. Some of which are the manufacturers you will see later on, of the equipment that is used in laboratories and manufactureres who produce Liposomes.

- Sonication of Biosolids — SONOTRONIC
- Ultrasonic Liposome Preparation
- Ultrasonic Treatment of Nanoparticles for Pharmaceuticals
- Liposomales Vitamin C selber machen / herstellen


You can read through those websites and get a good overview on what is needed and what Lipsomes are. The last link is in german though.

The issue at hand is that with household equipment you are not really able to make true liposomes - that requires commercial grade equipment and the necessary knowledge and skill.

Here is a good summary (from the best Lipo company/product I could find, mentioned here) that sums it up pretty nicely and corresponds with my own research into the topic. "Making liposomal vitamin C at home is pretty much impossible for the layman.":

So, you wanna make homemade liposomal vitamin C ?​

On the Internet, especially on YouTube, you can read and see how to make liposomal vitamin C by yourself. Here, we show and explain that and why it is impossible to make such a product yourself.

Making liposomal vitamin C yourself: requirements​

Making liposomal vitamin C at home is pretty much impossible for the layman. To produce a truly liposomal product, you need a nanotechnology process. So what does that mean?
Nano stands for nanometer (nm). A nanometer is the millionth part of a millimeter = 0.000 001 mm, or 1 million times smaller than a millimeter. The scale relevant to us is 1-100 nm. Objects of these sizes cannot be seen by eye or with an optical microscope; you would need an electron microscope.
So, you can only call something a nanoproduct if it has a main fraction of 1-150 nm, which according to our quality guarantee, as you can see, is really true for our products.
 is it possible to make your liposomal vitamin c at home? homemade liposomal vitamin c.
Size scale comparison

  • 1 meter
  • 1 centimeter
  • 1 millimeter
  • 1 micrometer (Bacteria usually measure 10-50 µm (micrometers) but can be up to 700 µm in size).
  • 1 nanometer (Viruses measure around 50 nm but can be up to 400 nm).
  • 1 picometer (one billion picometers equal 1 millimeter)

Why does a liposomal drink have to have such small particles?​

This is the most crucial point: a vitamin C liposome, in order to achieve the best bioavailability, must be about 100-250 nm in size. This size is relevant for absorption through the intestine, passage into the bloodstream, and onward transport to our cells where it is needed.

To support our own explanation, here are two derived from numerous scientific studies (in English).
The size scale of liposomes varies, but a mean size near 100 nm is quite typical.
…and, from 2018…
Particles in the size of below 200 nm for targeting tumour tissues.

If these particles are larger than 250 nm, they cannot be optimally absorbed by the intestinal villi and are excreted through the intestines, significantly lowering their bioavailability.
Some readers may now realize what the terms bioavailability and particle size are all about, and how important it is to purchase a genuine nanoproduct. Only a liposome of the required smallness in the nanoscale mentioned above can dock onto the cell to deliver its contents to it. Only a nanoproduct thus offers the health benefits of the liposomal form in addition to the convenient intake.

So what does it take to make such a nanoproduct?​


Let’s take a brief look at the internet / YouTube demos where so-called ultrasonic cleaners are used to produce liposomal vitamin C at home. It is indeed possible to reduce particles with ultrasound. However, no ultrasonic cleaner can achieve that, no matter how strong. A cleaner is just not made for this purpose because it is supposed to clean glasses, jewelry, cutlery, tools and so on, not to crush particles. It is, as the name suggests, an ultrasonic cleaner.

utra sonic cleaner


The metal vessel of such an ultrasonic cleaner would be shredded and dissolve into its components at the enormous energy that it takes to create nanoparticles!
In addition, ultrasonic cleaners operate at a frequency of mostly 40-50 KHz, which is useless for liposomal production. For this purpose, 20 KHz are required.

Of course, everyone is free to doubt our statements and explanations. You can only be sure if you subject your self-produced ‘liposomal’ beverage to a particle measurement. This is done, for example, by the company Microtrac.com in Germany where we have our products periodically checked. These particle measurements using laser technology in turn require special and expensive equipment and the associated expertise, which we lack. If you produce liposomal(?) vitamin C yourself and do not want to lie to yourself and are critical, then the above address is exactly right for you.

liposomal first step production machine


Producing liposomal vitamin C yourself requires the necessary machinery, laboratory equipment and expertise, in addition to the financial investment, of course, which is not really small, even if you use some common lab equipment and small quantities at home. So, you actually need special machines and materials that can withstand such vibrations and forces. A special generator produces these frequencies with a power of about 2000 watts, which is delivered to the liquid in a highly concentrated form by a so-called sonotrode with a diameter of just 3-4 cm.

These machines have a very complex design. Part of this enormous energy is converted into heat, which requires a suitable cooling system. Lecithin does not tolerate high heat because it is a lipid. Also needed are pumps, valves and special pressure vessels to achieve the right consistency and shelf life. Endless chrome steel lines and pressure regulators complete the equipment.

The sonotrode is the end piece of such an apparatus, and it fulfills the purpose of crushing the surrounding medium. It is the part that absorbs the high vibrational energy and delivers it to the medium (in our case, the “pre-liposomal” mixture. This actual head of the ultrasonic system is made of high-grade titanium, because no other material can withstand these large focused energies. Still, these hard titanium sonotrodes very soon become perforated and need to be replaced frequently. At the tip of this sonotrode, there are cavitation velocities of over 1000 km/h! This may give you an idea of the enormous forces acting on the fluid! It should be clear now that producing genuine liposomal vitamin C is not quite as simple as the demos on YouTube would have you believe.

The picture on the right shows a new sonotrode made of titanium with a smooth surface.
sonotrode-titan-new


And here is a used sonotrode in visibly perforated condition.
sonotrode-titan-used


The operation of the sonotrode is accompanied by a very loud, penetrating high-frequency whistling sound. To work with such an apparatus at home would probably call the police as well as the fire department into action… Besides, a sonotrode with generator and transducer costs about EUR 9000, and can be obtained from the company Hielscher Ultrasonic in Germany.

So what?​


Quite frankly, we want to give the private and prospective “liposome manufacturers” the bare facts. That is why we are not afraid to disclose the corresponding companies in our links.

Please do not be fooled by the videos and instructions on the Internet. Ultimately, when you have your “liposomal vitamin C” tested according to the instructions on the Internet, you will see that the whole financial effort (mixer, ultrasonic cleaner, lecithin and vitamin C) was not worth it, even if you would get these utensils as a gift. To sum up, it is not possible to produce real liposomal vitamin C on a nanobasis by yourself.

What you get when following these internet instructions is a simple emulsion-like substance containing vitamin C, lecithin, and water, but never a liposomal product, and you could just as well take vitamin C tablets or capsules to meet your vitamin C needs, which would be much cheaper to boot, and without messing up your kitchen.


messy kitchen
 

Gaby

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In our experience (last few years), it's always a good idea to invest in the real deal. It has helped us a lot. If you can afford it, I would buy some liposomal vitamin C to have in hand.

One thing we do to save money is to put 1/4th up to half a bottle of liposomal vitamin C in the blender, like this one:


We add 2 tablespoons of ascorbic acid and erythritol to taste, and water until it reaches the 800ml level on the blender. We blend everything and have it in a bottle to drink (around 30ml) or mixed with a glass of water (around 30ml in a glass of water).

It's diluted, but it's still pretty good.
 

jcsmalz

The Force is Strong With This One
In our experience (last few years), it's always a good idea to invest in the real deal. It has helped us a lot. If you can afford it, I would buy some liposomal vitamin C to have in hand.

One thing we do to save money is to put 1/4th up to half a bottle of liposomal vitamin C in the blender, like this one:


We add 2 tablespoons of ascorbic acid and erythritol to taste, and water until it reaches the 800ml level on the blender. We blend everything and have it in a bottle to drink (around 30ml) or mixed with a glass of water (around 30ml in a glass of water).

It's diluted, but it's still pretty good.
So once this is done, do you work your way up to bowel tolerance or... ?
 

Aerick

The Force is Strong With This One
In our experience (last few years), it's always a good idea to invest in the real deal. It has helped us a lot. If you can afford it, I would buy some liposomal vitamin C to have in hand.

One thing we do to save money is to put 1/4th up to half a bottle of liposomal vitamin C in the blender, like this one:


We add 2 tablespoons of ascorbic acid and erythritol to taste, and water until it reaches the 800ml level on the blender. We blend everything and have it in a bottle to drink (around 30ml) or mixed with a glass of water (around 30ml in a glass of water).

It's diluted, but it's still pretty good.
Hello Gaby,
Do you have an idea where I could buy this in France ?
For exemple is this convenient : Vitamine C liposomale
And where to find ascorbic acid and erythritol
Thank you for your help
 

Gaby

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FOTCM Member
Do you have an idea where I could buy this in France ?
For exemple is this convenient : Vitamine C liposomale
And where to find ascorbic acid and erythritol
Thank you for your help
You can give iherb.com or amazon.fr a try. The former one ships to France.
Alright, and I assume you would go for bowel tolerance for the mRNA vaccine protection protocol?
It wouldn't be a bad idea.
 
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