Cometary Encounters - Now available!

NewEngland Seeker

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Exciting information, Pierre. The whole Achilles Heel of materialism is that matter begot life which never has been proven. Whereas, life begets matter is that natural order of reality will never be understood by the materialist and will be heretical. Furthermore, that intelligence is extra cranial will cause a coronary.

As we study the ever intriguing reality that the seeds of life are sub microscopic and is intelligently directing the evolution of living matter we begin to realize our true nature as creative beings. Our future is to learn how to every improve our evolutionary environment to positively enhance the purpose the life itself. Cosmic gardeners, perhaps!
 

Beau

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Really excited to check this out, what a fascinating topic. I've loved reading your articles and glad to see it collected into book form. Congrats Pierre!

Regarding the venus flytrap (really interesting!), I wonder if there other instances of unique lifeforms popping up around cometary impacts. Did anything like that happen around Tunguska or other places of impact?
 

Pierre

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Regarding the venus flytrap (really interesting!), I wonder if there other instances of unique lifeforms popping up around cometary impacts. Did anything like that happen around Tunguska or other places of impact?
The only case I know is the one shared above by Pashalis about Venus' flytraps around Carolina's Bays. It's quite peculiar that the Flytraps that appeared probably ca. 12,900 BP at the time of the Carolina's Bays formation didn't disseminate further, knowing that a lot of plants were destroyed during this cometary bombardment and therefore the competition for ecological niche that the flytraps occupy was lessened.
 

PERLOU

The Living Force
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J'ai lu votre premier livre en Français, si et quand pensez vous que ce second livre sera traduit ?...
Bravo pour votre excellent travail, ce que vous avez exposé met l'eau à la bouche... LOVE

I read your first book in French, if and when do you think this second book will be translated ?
Bravo for your excellent work, what you have exposed makes your mouth water... LOVE
 

Pierre

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I read your first book in French, if and when do you think this second book will be translated ?
Bravo for your excellent work, what you have exposed makes your mouth water... LOVE
First things first, the content of the book has to be finalized, including the bibliography and the index. Then it will depend on the French translation team's availability to translate a book that contains close to 300 pages.
 

Pierre

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Like the strange fauna and flora that developed right in and around those bays (and only there and nowhere else on the planet) which look and behave quite alien compared to the rest of the planet. For example, the Venus flytraps (a meat eating plant) developed only in those Carolina Bays; they are native to that area alone, and nowhere else on the planet.


Venus' flytraps and Carolina Bays
Much to everyone's amazement, Venus' flytraps are not some strange, exotic plant. It is native only to the Carolinas, and, according to Wikipedia, probably within a 60-mile radius of Wilmington, North Carolina. They are found mostly around crater-like formations known as Carolina Bays, which are located mostly in the same area. Connections to these bays, which are thought to be caused by meteors, only help theories of their alien origins.

What makes this even more interesting is that many of those bays could have been created by atmospheric explosions of fireballs, similarly to the Tunguska event. So what effects might those atmospheric explosions have on living things, besides radiation type changes in the DNA? Incredibly interesting!

The Venus' Flytrap is very interesting indeed. Here's a draft of what will be a future chapter probably:



The Carolina Bays – ejecta impact sites of the primary cometary impact in Lake Michigan that started the Younger Dryas - tell a similar story:

Much to everyone's amazement, Venus' flytraps are not some strange, exotic plant. It is native only to the Carolinas, and, according to Wikipedia, probably within a 60-mile radius of Wilmington, North Carolina. They are found mostly around crater-like formations known as Carolina Bays, which are located mostly in the same area. Connections to these bays, which are thought to be caused by meteors, only help theories of their alien origins.[1]
While there are about 180 species[2] of carnivorous plant belonging to the droseraceraea family, Venus’ flytraps (Dionaea muscipula) are the only specie representative of the genus Dionaea.

The closest relative[3] of the Venus’ flytrap is a water plant called waterwheel (Aldrovanda vesiculosa), which is the only plant sharing the same snap trap mechanism[4].

Despite sharing a similar snap trap mechanism, Dionaea Muscipula and Aldrovanda vesiculosa are genetically extremely different:

The genome size of both cultured and wild Dionaea muscipula is 3.18 Gbp[5] and thus comparable in size with the human genome. In contrast, the genome sizes obtained for Aldrovanda vesiculosa are 509 Mbp[6]

As you can see in the picture below, there are obviously more than a few "random" mutations between the two “cousins”:

Genomes of the Venus Flytrap and Close Relatives bw.jpg© Palfalvi
A (left): Water plant waterwheel (Aldrovanda vesiculosa)
B (right): Ground plant Venus’ flytrap (Dionaea Muscipula)

Given the sudden and localized apparition of Venus’ flytrap out of thin air, it’s not surprising that Charles Darwin euphemistically coined the Venus’ flytrap as “one of the most wonderful in the world”[7]. He was certainly smart enough not to mention the serious challenges that Venus’ flytraps pose to his dogma.



[1] Everything is elecric Editors. (2015). "Flytraps are Venus’?”. Everythingiselectric
[2] Christenhusz, M. J. M. & Byng, J. W. (2016). "The number of known plants species in the world and its annual increase". Phytotaxa. Magnolia Press. 261 (3): 201–217
[3] Gibson, T. C.; Waller, D. M. (2009). "Evolving Darwin's 'most wonderful' plant: ecological steps to a snap-trap". New Phytologist. 183 (3): 575–587.
[4] Cameron, K. M.; Wurdack, K. J.; Jobson, R. W. (2002). "Molecular evidence for the common origin of snap-traps among carnivorous plants". American Journal of Botany. 89 (9): 1503–1509.
[5] Gbp stands for Giga base pair, referring to the pairs of bases (nucleotides: A,T,G,C) that constitute DNA.
[6] Palfalvi et al. (2020). “Genomes of the Venus Flytrap and Close Relatives Unveil the Roots of Plant Carnivory”. Curr Biol. 22;30(12):2312-2320.e5.
[7] Darwin, C. (1875), Insectivorous Plants, London, UK: John Murray
 
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