Changes in behaviour animals/pets

Ben

Jedi Council Member
French Marigold said:
Hi everyone

I didnt know where to put this post. Had tried to start it on the posting about the Rare Black Indigo Snake but no bites ha...ha...I have a terrifying snake phobia and shouldnt be concerning myself with this but I cant help but wonder.

Does anyone have any input regarding the many recent discoveries of snakes being found in the UK, here are the most recent two on Sott net:

www.sott.net/article/266278-Warden-finds-6ft-snake-on-roadside-Colchester-UK

http://www.sott.net/article/266277-Disco-the-snake-handed-into-nightclub-after-being-found-in-street-in-Dumfries-Scotland

I wonder if these reptiles can sense the change in the vibration of the planet or humans?

I researched a little on the web and found a study done on snakes regarding vibration and hearing (they are actually deaf)

http://jeb.biologists.org/content/215/2/331

The conclusion on their study is as follows:

"Snakes would therefore be expected to have very poor pressure hearing and generally be insensitive to airborne sound, whereas the connection of the middle ear bone to the jaw bones in snakes should confer acute sensitivity to substrate vibrations."

"From this we conclude that pythons, and possibly all snakes, lost effective pressure hearing with the complete reduction of a functional outer and middle ear, but have an acute vibration sensitivity that may be used for communication and detection of predators and prey."

I would be interested to hear any comments about this.
None of these snakes are native to the UK and the increasing number of sightings of them is due to the increasing number of people keeping them. Snakes are incredible escape artists and many people are learning this the hard way. These stories to me are an indication of the explosion in popularity of reptile pets, their decrease in price and increase in availability, and in conjunction with this the number if irresponsible keepers. They are behaving in a way which is to be expected - looking for places with adequate warmth which are not likely to be found outside in the UK. The snake in the first story, for example, was incorrectly identified by the so called 'experts' and is actually Hydrodynastes gigas - a species which I keep and is native to Brazil. It's now dead where a North american species would maybe have survived the low temperatures. It is also mildly venomous and probably shouldn't be sold to just anybody, but is now widely available because so many people are breeding privately.

This is also the case with all the stories of pythons we have seen recently, none of which are native to the placese they were seen. So that's the 'mechanism' by which these stories have increased. This of course in no way precludes the possibility that they represent a symbolic communication about the presence psychopaths among us.
 

Guardian

The Living Force
French Marigold said:
I wonder if these reptiles can sense the change in the vibration of the planet or humans?
I don't know about that, but a Ranger did tell me that several different kinds of southern snakes are moving up here due to the massive flooding in the lowlands. Their habitats are literally being washed away, so their migration at least has something to do with Earth changes. The Ranger even noted how our climate is changing, and how we're having MUCH warmer winters in the mountains then he remembers from his childhood. Of course he chalked it up to "Global Warming" but there's clearly more to it than that.
 

Ellipse

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
The dog of my parent friend seems to behave a bit strange since two weeks. This is a mature dog, 15/16 years old I think. They regularly go with him in the forest to walk and he is free to go where he want but he's usually always not very far. Now he seems to completely liberate himself. He does not responding to call and go far in the forest, coming back only one half hour later. Neighbourhood's dog seem to behave the same. Location of this is the centre of France.

Perhaps an increase or change on the surface of the region. Just to note down.
 

MusicMan

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
It's probably worth noting here that Europe harbours the disease Rabies, so if you have an animal whose behaviour is not normal it would be worth checking the symptoms, especially excessive slavering. You don't want to be bitten by a rabid animal.
 

Ellipse

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
MusicMan said:
It's probably worth noting here that Europe harbours the disease Rabies, so if you have an animal whose behaviour is not normal it would be worth checking the symptoms, especially excessive slavering. You don't want to be bitten by a rabid animal.
If infected by the Rabie virus the dog would be menacing no?
 

MusicMan

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Have a look at this page:
_http://www.healthcommunities.com/rabies/symptoms.shtml

Your animal may not be menacing initially.
Be careful out there.
 

3DStudent

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Our dog was behaving a bit weird last night. We let her out and she wouldn't come in for more than 30 minutes. She wouldn't respond to calls. I went out with her and she would come to me, but would just walk past me and not really pay attention. She is kind of shy and doesn't really listen when you tell her something to begin with. But this seemed odd. And I tried to direct her in when she was close to the door by standing behind her and nudging her in, but she wouldn't go in.

We've seen her stand outside and stare at the moon before. But I think the moon was only a sliver yesterday and it was too cloudy to see. There were also some fire engines with their sirens on and she is usually scared of loud vehicles. Eventually we got her to come in, but it seemed like she did so reluctantly. She's a good dog, but a bit quirky and skiddish. We think the owner of her during her first few months abused her. But this seemed a bit more strange than usual. I was wondering if it was something in the air, or earth changes. And I was thinking about the session where they said animals could have malevolent attachments. But she seems fine today, so fwiw.
 

lainey

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
We had a gigantic wasp in our stockroom at work and everyone was commenting about it being the wrong time of year in Scotland for wasps. I've never seen one so huge. I would guess at 3 inches long.
 

mkrnhr

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
lainey said:
We had a gigantic wasp in our stockroom at work and everyone was commenting about it being the wrong time of year in Scotland for wasps. I've never seen one so huge. I would guess at 3 inches long.
Is it a Chinese hornet? They have been introduced to Europe very recently _http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/pictured-deadly-asian-hornet-three-3894956
 

Palinurus

The Living Force
lainey said:
We had a gigantic wasp in our stockroom at work and everyone was commenting about it being the wrong time of year in Scotland for wasps. I've never seen one so huge. I would guess at 3 inches long.
Hi lainey,

You've probably seen a queen wasp as those are the only surviving specimens in autumn. She probably was searching for a safe place to hibernate.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zbgZ40Emqo

_http://www.ehow.com/how_8495432_identify-queen-wasp.html

ehow said:
1 Note the time of year. If it is early spring, any living wasp you see is a queen wasp -- queens are the only wasps that survive the autumn, and new worker wasps do not hatch from their eggs until later in the season.

2 Approach the wasp in question carefully and compare it to other wasps. Queen wasps and worker wasps look alike except for their size: queens are noticeably bigger. If you can see multiple wasps and one is clearly bigger than the others, she is the queen.

3 Identify a queen in the fall by looking for solitary wasps. The queen departs her nest at the end of the summer, so none of the insects remaining in a hive or swarm during the fall are the queen.

4 Identify a queen in the winter by finding a dormant wasp. The rest of the nest is dead, so any living wasp is a queen. She hibernates, or overwinters, in a small, dry space, such as inside a rotting tree trunk or under wooden trim in a house. If you see a solitary, overwintering wasp in the winter, it is a queen.
 

lainey

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
mkrnhr said:
lainey said:
We had a gigantic wasp in our stockroom at work and everyone was commenting about it being the wrong time of year in Scotland for wasps. I've never seen one so huge. I would guess at 3 inches long.
Is it a Chinese hornet? They have been introduced to Europe very recently _http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/pictured-deadly-asian-hornet-three-3894956
Thankfully it was not, I was stung by one of these when I was on Koh Chang in Thailand a couple of years ago. It was incredibly painful.
Palinurus said:
lainey said:
We had a gigantic wasp in our stockroom at work and everyone was commenting about it being the wrong time of year in Scotland for wasps. I've never seen one so huge. I would guess at 3 inches long.
Hi lainey,

You've probably seen a queen wasp as those are the only surviving specimens in autumn. She probably was searching for a safe place to hibernate.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zbgZ40Emqo

_http://www.ehow.com/how_8495432_identify-queen-wasp.html

ehow said:
1 Note the time of year. If it is early spring, any living wasp you see is a queen wasp -- queens are the only wasps that survive the autumn, and new worker wasps do not hatch from their eggs until later in the season.

2 Approach the wasp in question carefully and compare it to other wasps. Queen wasps and worker wasps look alike except for their size: queens are noticeably bigger. If you can see multiple wasps and one is clearly bigger than the others, she is the queen.

3 Identify a queen in the fall by looking for solitary wasps. The queen departs her nest at the end of the summer, so none of the insects remaining in a hive or swarm during the fall are the queen.

4 Identify a queen in the winter by finding a dormant wasp. The rest of the nest is dead, so any living wasp is a queen. She hibernates, or overwinters, in a small, dry space, such as inside a rotting tree trunk or under wooden trim in a house. If you see a solitary, overwintering wasp in the winter, it is a queen.
This is exactly what was happening, she was checking out the shoe boxes and I caught her when she was popping in the hole in the front of a boot box. The shop was a bit perplexed when I came scuttling through the shop floor with the box at arms length and flung it in the street outside. :P

Thank you both for your replies
 

Ellipse

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
MusicMan said:
Have a look at this page:
_http://www.healthcommunities.com/rabies/symptoms.shtml

Your animal may not be menacing initially.
Be careful out there.
Thanks, I was not aware of the behaviour change during the incubation phase. The dog live in the house so it's a bit strange if he has been bitten by another dog but, who know?
I will transmit the info.
 

Justin

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Ellipse said:
The dog of my parent friend seems to behave a bit strange since two weeks. This is a mature dog, 15/16 years old I think. They regularly go with him in the forest to walk and he is free to go where he want but he's usually always not very far. Now he seems to completely liberate himself. He does not responding to call and go far in the forest, coming back only one half hour later. Neighbourhood's dog seem to behave the same. Location of this is the centre of France.

Perhaps an increase or change on the surface of the region. Just to note down.
Rabies is very over-hyped in the US, as a way to sell more vaccines. I don’t know about other places though.

For the causes of changes in behavior I’d look at diet first, then changes in the environment and injury/illness. Changes in diet can definitely cause behavior changes. If my dog eats a lot of omega-3 fats it makes her much more nervous and clingy for a day or so. Pork makes her lethargic and more relaxed. It could be something the dog is eating while out on walks too. If he's going far into the forest, maybe there's something really good in there, like bones or meat, or there once was.
 

Yozilla

The Living Force
Some rare occurrences in wild life:

Zeus - blind owl with starry eyes: _http://cottagelife.com/96759/environment/wildlife/meet-zeus-the-blind-screech-owl-with-stars-in-his-eyes

&

Albus - Adriatic Albino Dolphin:_http://news.softpedia.com/news/Rare-Albino-Dolphin-Spotted-Swimming-in-the-Mediterranean-456794.shtml
 

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MusicMan

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Not quite sure where to put this one, but it's a behavioural thing, so here we go:

Today I was gardening, and this bird swooped me; I said to myself, "Hey! Watch it mate!" I thought it was a magpie.
Anyway a few minutes later it happened again; and then, a bird alighted onto the fence next to me. It was a Lorikeet.
I reached my hand out, and the bird hopped onto my hand and walked up my arm to my shoulder, and settled there.
My wife was watching, so I told her to go and get the camera.
So we have this photo on her phone camera of me in my gardening gear with a Lorikeet on my shoulder.

The bird hung around for about 15 minutes, even walking down the path and trying to climb up my wife's leg.
It got up to her stomach before she freaked out. I rescued it.
I thought it must have been somebody's pet, it was so tame.
It was a bit late for "Talk like a Pirate day", but it felt like I was a pirate with this miniature parrot on my shoulder.
I gave it a name: "Bert".

Then it flew up onto the roof and disappeared into a tree .
"Aaarrrghhh"

Weird things seem to happen to me on March 16th.
 
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