Baldness, losing hair?

EGVG

Dagobah Resident
D Rusak said:
Hi EGVG,

I've been adding rosemary (and lavender) essential oil to my organic conditioner for a good long time now, probably 2-3 years. Mostly I heard it was good for general hair health, and I like how it smells. Hasn't had any effect on greying, from what I can tell- definitely the white hairs keep on coming!

My hair gets really greasy when I apply just oil as conditioner- is this a special treatment you are recommending at night or something? I have not tried the specific blend you are talking about but when I've used things like coconut oil, olive oil, blend of jojoba, apricot, almond oil and essential oils- even just a little bit- my hair is soooo greasy. Works ok as an overnight treatment though it hasn't been anything life-changing. My hair is in general good health, never dyed or permed or anything, so I guess there isn't much change to notice probably in that regard, just the greying. I guess I don't care enough about it though to try henna! :cool:

Just use Jojoba oil, its the best for oily scalps. Rosemary essential oil is not efficient! You need to maserate it on Jojoba oil. Also try to find a shampoo that cleanses enough your hair without making it break or dry. Conditioners can block you hair follicles and cause hair loss and thinning. So do not use any other oil that Jojoba, and do not use rosemary essential oil, you need the real stuff, use fresh rosemary to do the maserate. Good Luck!!!!! OH!! I was forgetting, what is your natural hair color?, Because rosemary will turn it as dark as it can get.

EDU
 

Odyssey

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Sage is good for getting rid of gray hair.

From: _http://www.herbs2000.com/herbs/herbs_sage.htm
Sage is often used for actually taking away gray hair. This may be excellent to use because of the fact that it is completely natural, and is therefore free of any chemicals in any form. The infusion can be prepared like this: in a heavy ceramic mixing bowl put two large tablespoons of dried sage and the same amount again of either orange pekoe or black tea. Then fill the bowl half full of boiling water. Cover with a small plate and place in a moderately warm (275°F) oven or in a large pan of boiling water on top of the stove on a low setting for at least a couple of hours. Then remove, cool, stir well and strain. Once the infusion is ready, it can be kept stored in a safe and dry place, and used on the scalp four to five times a week, rubbed into the roots. If used regularly, the infusion will start showing results within a few days, when the grays will start disappearing gradually, as the hair starts becoming darker once again. Once this happens, however, one must remember that one can only use the infusion once or twice a week and not more, and that too for the purposes of maintenance. There are some people who vouch for the efficacy of sage in treating hair conditions; bald spots have filled with hair and at the very least, they have reported noticing an overall improvement in the tone and the texture and the color of one’s hair. If one were to add about 3 tbsps. of either gin or rum to the infusion, it would keep longer.
 

sairie

Jedi Master
Starmie- First, Thank you ! I hope all goes well and swiftly in getting your recipes out for others to use! I wonder if a tailored shampoo could be made per individuals desires in oils scents and herb?
I was just wondering could coconut oil be used instead of the oils you listed for your dry scalp recipe without altering its effectiveness?
Rosemary, sage, nettles, oat straw, chickweed, lavender flowers, aloe Vera, hibiscus, - ( these all from my own plants) black tea, coffee and apple cider vinegar these are all things I have read and used either as a rinse or tea and drunk to help.

Again thank you for sharing! :)
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Another thing to consider is iron overload. I was reading on the Hemochromatosis book that it is related with baldness. More info here: http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php/topic,20265.0.html
 

Deckard

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Well the most common cause of hair thinning or alopecia ( baldness) is so called androgynous alopecia which is basically genetically predisposed oversensitivity of the hair root to the normal level of sexual hormones. In other words there is no cure for it and some scientist believe its the natural part of sexual dimorphism in homo sapiens species, same as the crest is in a rooster or antlers in a stag.

Rather then spending fortune on different "miraculous cures" I think the best cure is acceptance and learning to be comfortable in ones own skin. Of course this is easier said then done for those who start loosing hair in their twenties.

Having bold father I spent most of my youth being terribly frightened I will start loosing hair - it didn't start until my late 30-ies and then I couldn't care less. Probably because it happened so gradually that I had plenty of time to get used to this new me.
 

sairie

Jedi Master
Yes Psyche, I have read up on Iron overload as a possible cause for hair loss thank you for bringing it up it is an important point to bring up ! and I too agree with you Radagast that one should be comfortable and not be concerned with what other think of the way one looks this is Important but there can be very simple treatments such as the herbs mentioned and one should not overlook something as serious as an Iron overload which could very well be the underlining or contributing cause of alopecia and basic hair thinning. one should consider, read and research ask many questions of all fields of medicine herbalists Doctors (if you can find one with knowledge and openness which is unlike 90% of western doctors of medicine to be), though one can get lucky.
Thank you both for the reply !! :)
 

Ricky

A Disturbance in the Force
I have seen many people who have hair fall and even i have also this problem from last two years. The main reason of this problem is the lack of vitamins in body. This is true that iron deficiency causes hair loss.
 

SeekinTruth

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Welcome to the forum Ricky.

Seeing that this is your first post on the forum, we would appreciate it if you would post a brief intro about yourself in the Newbies section, telling us how you found this forum, how long you've been reading it and/or the SOTT page, whether or not you've read any of Laura's books yet, etc.
 

ytain

Jedi
_http://www.uni-mainz.de/eng/13060.php

_http://peoplestrusttoronto.wordpress.com/2013/05/13/gray-hair-as-well-as-vitiligo-now-can-be-reversed-as-scientists-get-to-the-roots/

_http://howtolookbeautifulnaturally.com/featured-articles/your-toothpaste-may-be-turning-your-hair-gray/

There it explains how the hair turns gray or white.

My hypothesis is that the iron overload can prompt the excess production of hydrogen peroxide as I've read that in the iron overload/hemochromatosis books. Which then increases the oxidative stress that is shown visible thru the color of the hair or thinning/balding.

I remember my grandparents' hair turning white after being 80 years old. I started to have few hairs turning white in the very early 30s.

What I remember about my grandmother is that she used to do the onion/garlic juice hair mask frequently. So I searched and there's various postings on forums related to natural hair care where they used the same thing my grandmother did.

The problem here is that you'll smell a lot like onion/garlic. One solution to this is to do onion/garlic/rosemary/ginger/sage/peppermint tincture (alcohol or vinegar base) and use it. It can aid in hair regrowth and returning to original color.

You can find several youtube videos about the experiments with the onion juice for reversal of bald spots or hairline.

You can't expect the results to be fast. It takes time! So you need persistence and patience.

Ytain
 

ytain

Jedi
ytain said:
My hypothesis is that the iron overload can prompt the excess production of hydrogen peroxide as I've read that in the iron overload/hemochromatosis books. Which then increases the oxidative stress that is shown visible thru the color of the hair or thinning/balding.

Wouldn't that raise bells in your head that on the web is a protocol circulating on the web of using diluted hydrogen peroxide internally? Wouldn't that raise the oxidative stress in the body without an obvious buffer (catalase enzyme)?
Catalase enzyme production decreases with age, and the food with the most concentrated amount of catalase enzyme is the liver.

More on the catalase enzyme and its dual purpose: _http://www.catalase.com/cataext.htm
From the above link, the catalase enzyme also can bind the hydrogen peroxide to some of the toxins helping the body move it out.

Ytain
 

Recto

Jedi
While hairloss can be an esthetically-driven struggle, it may also be a sign of underlying body dysfunctions and deficiencies. I started to lose my hairs just before I turned 18. Since I had in mind that it was a purely genetic condition (my parents and grand-parents were bald or had fragile hairs), I reluctantly came to term with the fact I'd be bald by 25. Around that time, I also got tested for very low vitamin D3 levels after complaining about fatigue and depression. I was ordered to take supplements for a few weeks and I must admit that neither did it address my deficiency nor the underlying condition responsible for my chronic fatigue and depression.

Fast forwarding to last year (ca. 8 years later), I now had lost 85% of my hairs on top of my head. In a last feeble and desesperate attempt (did I say that I was reluctant to begin with ?), I looked again for the causes of hairloss. I then stumbled upon a few case studies on the connection between vitamin D3 deficiency and what is called nonscarring alopecia/diffuse hair fall :
Since I knew that I was deficient and that vitamin D3 wasn't a drug with horrible side effects, I started to supplement up to 10,000 UI daily. From what I understand, such high doses of vitamin D3 could be toxic if taken for long spans of time (e.g. more than 3 months). According to @Gaby's posts here and here, it could provoke premature aging/reduce longetivity in people with low kidney functions (among probably other things, who knows ?). In short th deficiency itself may be caused by another dysfunction, so we may be only addressing the symptom here. On a sidenote, vitamin K2 MK7 and Magnesium should be supplemented as well with such a high dosage of vitamin D3 since they are cofactors.

I spend probably 99.9% of my time inside with no Sun exposure, so vitamin D3 deficiency isn't a mystery in my case. Anyhow, I'll dial back to 2000 UI just for maintenance. After the 1st month my hairs stopped falling, and by the 2nd month they started to grow back. The regrowth is veeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeery slow (i.e. at that pace it'll take a few years to get them all back. If it goes that far that is), but it is definitely better than nothing.

In my case, the slow growth may be due to other body dysfunctions I didn't address yet. I shaved by accident a patch of hairs on the side of my head a few months ago and it didn't fully regrow. Hairs grew back but I can still make out clearly the area shaved (not the same hair density/length).

From what I've understood from the case studies, this type of hair loss affect many women too (which is a bigger problem esthetically speaking). And it may be connected to the larger issue of vitamin D3 deficiency which may not always be caused by insufficient Sun exposure, but also by chronic health problems (among other things). So beware of balding, it may be worse than it looks ;-)
 

EGVG

Dagobah Resident
While hairloss can be an esthetically-driven struggle, it may also be a sign of underlying body dysfunctions and deficiencies. I started to lose my hairs just before I turned 18. Since I had in mind that it was a purely genetic condition (my parents and grand-parents were bald or had fragile hairs), I reluctantly came to term with the fact I'd be bald by 25. Around that time, I also got tested for very low vitamin D3 levels after complaining about fatigue and depression. I was ordered to take supplements for a few weeks and I must admit that neither did it address my deficiency nor the underlying condition responsible for my chronic fatigue and depression.

Fast forwarding to last year (ca. 8 years later), I now had lost 85% of my hairs on top of my head. In a last feeble and desesperate attempt (did I say that I was reluctant to begin with ?), I looked again for the causes of hairloss. I then stumbled upon a few case studies on the connection between vitamin D3 deficiency and what is called nonscarring alopecia/diffuse hair fall :
Since I knew that I was deficient and that vitamin D3 wasn't a drug with horrible side effects, I started to supplement up to 10,000 UI daily. From what I understand, such high doses of vitamin D3 could be toxic if taken for long spans of time (e.g. more than 3 months). According to @Gaby's posts here and here, it could provoke premature aging/reduce longetivity in people with low kidney functions (among probably other things, who knows ?). In short th deficiency itself may be caused by another dysfunction, so we may be only addressing the symptom here. On a sidenote, vitamin K2 MK7 and Magnesium should be supplemented as well with such a high dosage of vitamin D3 since they are cofactors.

I spend probably 99.9% of my time inside with no Sun exposure, so vitamin D3 deficiency isn't a mystery in my case. Anyhow, I'll dial back to 2000 UI just for maintenance. After the 1st month my hairs stopped falling, and by the 2nd month they started to grow back. The regrowth is veeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeery slow (i.e. at that pace it'll take a few years to get them all back. If it goes that far that is), but it is definitely better than nothing.

In my case, the slow growth may be due to other body dysfunctions I didn't address yet. I shaved by accident a patch of hairs on the side of my head a few months ago and it didn't fully regrow. Hairs grew back but I can still make out clearly the area shaved (not the same hair density/length).

From what I've understood from the case studies, this type of hair loss affect many women too (which is a bigger problem esthetically speaking). And it may be connected to the larger issue of vitamin D3 deficiency which may not always be caused by insufficient Sun exposure, but also by chronic health problems (among other things). So beware of balding, it may be worse than it looks ;-)

Hello Recto, I had a D3 deficiency, but my baldness actually seems to be completely normal and expected when you have too much testosterone as is my case. I'm now bald, and I love it I feel like I stand out. Hair takes too much time to care for also! So I feel lucky to be bald. Sorry for the recipe I posted, it didn't work for me or anyone I know.

Also, I went to an astrologer that told me that my natal chart was too sun centric and that was the reason for my baldness, I liked her take on it.
 
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